Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
tanstaafl2

Argentina beckons!

Recommended Posts

Now less than 2 weeks until my departure for Buenos Aires and points (very) south.

Argentina is of course known for wine but other than Fernet Branca, which isn't even local, I already have and can get here in the US easily of course, there doesn't seem to be a specific liquor or liqueur to be on the lookout for.

No cachaça like Brazil or pisco from Peru. So is there anything I should be looking for to bring home that reflects the country other than wine?

When searching Argentina on the forum I did find this post that suggested genever is a common drink amongst porteños. Didn't know that! I wonder if I might stumble across the elusive van Wees Roggenaer there? Alas, probably not.

Gotta be something with a local connection worth trying, right?

Or should I stick to looking for a good deal on standard options at the duty free on the way home (maybe the aforementioned cachaça?) or consider "acquiring" a bottle of Havana Club if they have it?

On the plus side I did stumble across this post about a Porteño cocktail. That sounds tasty!


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Argentine brandies deserve mention, Taanstafl. They're every bit as subtle as Spanish Jerez brandies, particularly those put out by the Trapiche winery.

The other thing to look out for is Pisani, which is similar to Cachaça.

If you do buy Cachaça in Argentina, look out for the brand '51' which is perhaps the best available outside of Brazil.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good to know! Makes sense that wine country might also make a decent brandy. I have a Spanish Jerez brandy (Lepanto) so might make a nice comparison.

If I decide to go the cachaça route I will look for 51 as you suggest or perhaps the pisani. But I think 51 is pretty readily available here in the US unless it is an export version that is not as good. I know it is one of the bigger brands in Brazil.

Germana cachaça is one I have heard some Brazilian friends mention, especially the 10yo. Wasn't sure how much I might find in Buenos Aires.

I always try to ask locals once I get there to get some ideas as well.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once you go over 2 years of aging, you are aware that Cachaça becomes Reposao, right? Any 10 year Cachaça will actually be closer in character to very good rum.

Not the name specifically (sounds a bit like reposado for tequila so perhaps a similar origin?) but yes, I have read that aged cachaça is more a sipping drink like an aged rum and that younger cachaça is generally used in the classic caipirinha and other cocktails. Will look for both but if I had to choose I would probably go for something aged as I can get basic cachaça here at home pretty easily these days. Haven't seen much if any aged cachaça though.

Seems to be a big split between larger production column still "industrial cachaça" and smaller pot still "artisanal cachaça". I expect everything in the US comes from the larger producers so I would be inclined to look for something from a smaller artisanal producer. Most sites suggest looking for cachaça made in the Minas Gerais region.

We shall see. May not be all that many options in Buenos Aires and fewer still in the duty free at the airport. I am in BA to start the trip but on my return I go straight from the ship to Ushuaia to Ezeiza airport to home. Didn't really want to have to haul it around in my luggage the whole trip so I may be limited to what I can find at the airport in BA on the way home.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, you'll still have a day or two in BA before departing, yes? Why not do all of your shopping then?

On a semirelated note, look for the South American Explorers clubhouse in BA - they've got excellent resources as well as storage for members, and if you're going to be more than a week in South America, membership is a very good idea (there are also discounts, travel tips, etc). The staff will likely also be able to point you in the direction of the best liquors - I have yet to meet SAE members or staff who don't like a nip now and again, and they're generally quality fanatics.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, you'll still have a day or two in BA before departing, yes? Why not do all of your shopping then?

On a semirelated note, look for the South American Explorers clubhouse in BA - they've got excellent resources as well as storage for members, and if you're going to be more than a week in South America, membership is a very good idea (there are also discounts, travel tips, etc). The staff will likely also be able to point you in the direction of the best liquors - I have yet to meet SAE members or staff who don't like a nip now and again, and they're generally quality fanatics.

Sounds interesting. I will make a note of the clubhouse.

On my return from Antarctica I will have only a few hours in BA awaiting a connection between flights so I will not be able to go back into town. Anything I buy in BA at the start of the trip would have to be carried for the 2 weeks during the cruise. If it is something really interesting I will do it but weight is a bit of a concern as we must pack for extremes of weather and I always bring an excess of photo gear to begin with! Not to mention the risk of breakage.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have been wandering the streets of BA the last 3 days (with a side trip to Colonia, Uruguay) but haven't seen any must buys yet. Liquor stores aren't that readily obvious at least to me, perhaps because I am in the touristy areas, but did see a couple of aged cachaca's.

May just resort to a little Havana Club rum on my way home.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...