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Chicken Parmesan

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Who has a favorite method/recipe for Chicken Parm? I expect leftovers, so something that will give me a tasty sandwich tomorrow would be great, too. I have viewed a million recipes for grilling, baking, breadcrumbs, fry it first, bake it first, etc, etc. Suggestions?

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I pound it thin, salt and pepper it, dredge in flour, egg wash, bread w panko + Parm +garlic powder salt and pepper. Fry in a half inch of oil. Then put mozzarella and a dab of sauce and broil till bubbly.

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I like the idea of chicken Parmesan, but hate the frying mess, so recently I broiled the chicken after coating it in parmesan and parsley seasoned crumbs, then put a bit of sauce and cheese on it before running under the broiler to melt the cheese. I do eggplant parmesan this way (often leaving out the mozzarella) and we love it. Flavourful, light, and little mess. Goes great in a sandwich as well! I just make a sauce using the Marcella Hazan method: tomatoes and half an onion cooked over gentle heat for 30 min or so. not very traditional, though...

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I do mine exactly the same way as Gfweb said above, though I may not use a full half inch of oil -- more like an eighth or a quarter... Turns out fantastic.

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Cook's Country in episode 312 did a skillet Ck Parm.

its excellent: you have to find a way to see this.

I a big fan of Cook's Country and America's test kitchen -- the shows, not so much the books

they are not perfect but sometimes they come up with a different way of making a 'classic' and its mkuch better.

esseentially: thin ck br. just cooked arfe placed on a tomato home made sauce in a skillet. 3 cheeses are placed on top of this then bread crumbs that have been browned with added parm are placed on top

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Cook's Country in episode 312 did a skillet Ck Parm.

its excellent: you have to find a way to see this.

I a big fan of Cook's Country and America's test kitchen -- the shows, not so much the books

they are not perfect but sometimes they come up with a different way of making a 'classic' and its mkuch better.

esseentially: thin ck br. just cooked arfe placed on a tomato home made sauce in a skillet. 3 cheeses are placed on top of this then bread crumbs that have been browned with added parm are placed on top

I think this is the recipe it is listed on the website.

http://www.cookscountry.com/recipes/Skillet-Chicken-Parmesan/7401/

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yep. good pick up. as long as you choose good diced tomats (or fresh garden ones in season) this dish is easy and spectacular.

on the show they did a few things differently and better I think ( sometimes I think they cant be bothered to detail their print recipes)

add the crushed tomats to the pan after you cook the Ck. add the tomats extra and heat and reduce about 5 min.

then to the rest.


Edited by rotuts (log)

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Hmmm... a deconstructed chix parm. I don't know. Seems to me that a fried crust is a vital part of the dish and though tasty, this wouldn't fit my idea of the thing.

Of course there's a philosophical issue here. How far can one stray from a classic dish and still give it that name. I'd say that no significant variation is acceptable if the name is to be retained. eg Reubens are made with pastrami or corned beef and kraut and not turkey and slaw.

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youre correct about the crust. but it you do the breadcrumbs correctly ( very very brown but Not Burnt) you get a very similar effect.

it helps to get very good quality canned tomats and the best cheese you can afford.

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WE dont make it, but pounding the breast meat and flapping ( butterflying) it open would give you different textures?

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Pounding gives even thickness and even cooking. I can never get a butterflied breast to cook evenly.

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eg Reubens are made with pastrami or corned beef and kraut and not turkey and slaw.

From what I understand, a Reuben is made with corned beef and the pastrami version is called a Rachel, and it often substitutes cole slaw for the sauerkraut. Both are tasty!

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Hmmm... a deconstructed chix parm. I don't know. Seems to me that a fried crust is a vital part of the dish and though tasty, this wouldn't fit my idea of the thing.

+1...had traditional chicken parm at a diner last weekend and one of my favorite pieces is that thin edge which escaped sauce and maybe still had a glaze of melted cheese, so it was all crispy crust surrounding the chicken...mmm

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I agree.

When one goes out one Gets the Classic

But at home? as long as you understand the 'crispy' bread crumbs

well It really good for home.

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I searched, and unless I'm not fully utilizing the function (in which case, I'm sorry) I haven't found a thread dedicated to chicken (or eggplant or shrimp...) parm. I was lucky enough to converse privately to get a lot of good recipes but figured others may want to share or may benefit from this post.

I have my sauce/gravy recipe down and am willing to share that as well. I'm also a novice cook. I hate dealing with raw meat and am never sure exactly at what point chicken goes from being moist to becoming dust. I'd also like to experiment with panko. Any suggestions? Any one else out there a parm-novice?

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I usually sous vide the chicken breast - if you do that, you can brown the breading in a really hot pan and not worry about the chicken getting cooked. But I also like the firmer texture you get without the SV step.

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America's Test Kitchen did a stove-top in the pan C.P a while back. maybe even further back

it did not have SV, but as i recall it did the simmer the CB in stock, turn off the heat, cover, wait, and then take them out

it did do the bread crumbs separately it works well once you get the idea.

the only touchy part of CP is to get right is the CB's done just right.

looked around, and here it is:

http://www.americastestkitchen.com/recipes/7323-best-chicken-parmesan

and its free

:huh:

PS guess it was somewhere else where they poached the chicken


Edited by rotuts (log)

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Just for a different approach, chef Pino Luongo makes Chicken Martini Style which initial prep. is very similar except the final coat is freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese instead of bread crumbs.You can finish it as per the original recipe or use it as the breast in a Chicken Parm. dish.


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)

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I do mine almost the same way as GFweb, but I rub the chicken breasts with fresh garlic, grated on a microplane. And I only use fresh bread crumbs (Not a fan of panko) with the addition of grated parmesan.

Chicken%20Parmesan%20April%209th%2C%2020

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I brown my panko breaded chicken in a small amount of olive oil, drain on paper towels and then place them on top of the sauce in a baking dish. I top the cutlets with shredded parmesan and mozzarella, then bake in a 400F oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until the cheeses are melted and lightly browned. I love the crust the melted cheese makes.

image.jpg

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Saltine cracker crumbs - about 1/2 cup, combined with about 1/4 C grated parmesan.

I do pound the breasts until somewhat thin. Then beat 1 egg with about 1 T water and a nice sprinkle of black pepper. Breasts go into egg bath, then into cracker/parmesan mixture to coat. I brown in hot veg (usually canola) oil with a little olive oil added for flavor.

Then into baking dish, top with sauce/gravy, and usually some mozzarella along with more parmesan.

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My CP is far from authentic, but we enjoy it. I SV chicken thighs, our preferred chicken meat, smother them with marinara sauce, then top with plenty of grated Parmesan. I pop those under the broiler for a minute or so, and serve.

 

I had other plans for dinner tonight but I'm going to do this instead. 😀

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A cheater's version involves breaded and frozen chicken tenders, marinara sauce, mozzarella and parmesan. Fry the tenders, assemble, run under the broiler to melt the cheese. It'll do when you're cooking dinner at the kids' house and working with what you've got on hand.

 

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Foodwishes has 4 recipies- two for classic version and two for casserole (cheater version, sort of). If I was making it at home, I'd probably opt for the latter. Link to all 4 HTH.

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