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Lior

eG Food Blog: Lior (2011)

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Lior   

Yes, Kent. We have people of all colors from over 70 countries, many from middle east countries (Turkey,Egypt,Iran, Iraq,Yemen etc), from north Africa(Morrocco, Libya, Algeria,Tunesia etc),South Africa, after the holocaust,from eastern European countries, from Europe,etc. In the late 70's over 300 Vietnamese boat refugees were rescued at sea and were given citizenship, so we also enjoy their food. In fact, there is a great restaurant right here in my home town, which is very popular.

Furama

The last few decades saw a large immigration from Ethiopia (Operation Moses and Solomon), and the former USSR. There are christians, muslims,Bahai and Jews. Everyone has their culture, their food and everyone holds on dearly to their ethnic foods. Many couples are mixed already, with marriages from all places and of all colors (from dark black to snow white,but the ethnic foods stays. And everyone enjoys everyone else's foods, however, the very popular foods are jachnun and malaawach from Yemen,couscous from north Africa, rice from Iran (Persian rice), arab restaurants with humus,pitas,salads and meats, of course falafel,shishlik etc. Not served much outside the home for some reason, but known to be excellent, is the Georgian kitchen.


Edited by Lior (log)

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Lior   

I just returned from my friend's house. Her christmas lunch yesterday was a success. The main traditional dishes that get served at christmas in Romania,according to Lilianna, are "Sarmale", which is stuffed leaves,she used cabbage,but grape leaves can also be used. Lilianna mentioned that perhaps it is originally from the Turkish influence as Romania was once conquered by Turkey. The cabbage first gets frozen solid. The defrozen and so it is easier to take the leaves off. Then they get pickled for a week or two depending on the climate. She pickles them in boiled water with coarse salt. Some people add carrots,peppercorns etc.

cabbage leaves picled in boiling water and salt.jpg

separated leaves ready to be stuffed

cabbage leaves defrozen and separated.jpg

The ingredients used to stuff them include beef, pork (which is available at one store here in the town I live in), tomatoes and oregano

cabbage leaves ingredients.jpg

cabbage leaves ingredients2.jpg

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Lior   

So then she mixes the ingredients together and stuffs the cabbage and rolls them up perfectly. When she places them in the baking dish, which belonged to her mother and is very heavy, she layers them, puttin smoked lard in between them and the layers. This lard she brings back from Romania whenever she visits there, and keeps frozen until she needs it!

cabbage rolles and smoked lard.jpg

the pots

pot1.jpg

pot2.jpg

Cabbage gets layered and tomatoes get poured on. Then she adds onions and grated cabbage on the top

cabbage layered 1.jpg

cabbage layered with grated cabbage on top.jpg

I dont know why this picture appears twice and I cannot remove it-sorry!

cabbage rolles and smoked lard.jpg


Edited by Lior (log)

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Lior   

The cabbage gets baked in the oven and here it is done and ready!

cabbage done1.jpg

cabbage done2.jpg

Another traditional dish, which reminded me of humus, is a white bean dish called "Fasole Batutu", with smiley mouths above the "a"s. The beans get cooked, mushed and have quite a lot of garlic in them. The top is decorated with onions fried in oil and paprika. I took a picture-a close up of the leftovers:

white bean mush.jpg

A liver pie is also traditional:

liver pie.jpg

And so "Salata de boeuf"

salata de boeuf.jpg

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Lior   

Dessert is "Cozonac", which is similar to a "Bulka" or a sweet bread stuffed with either nuts, or cocoa and sugar, or Rahat Lokum (Turkish delight)or figs. It is not easy to make as it "needs to be kneaded and then rise a few times"

The last piece, luckily it was left!

dessert.jpg

To get into the mood she had background music playing for her guests, and also for me today (!) The CD's are from Romania and enchanted me and are adorable so I will add them here:

carole cd2.jpg

carole cd1.jpg


Edited by Lior (log)

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Lior   

I forgot the Mamaliga (also leftovers)

mamaliga.jpg

Note the snowman, which is made from white radishes, a tomato hat and scarf, a carrot nose...

snowman.jpg

decorations to get into the mood:

christmas mood1.jpg

christmas mood2.jpg

Now everything is ready and the feast is about to happen:

table set1.jpg

My dear friend, Lilianna

liliana.jpg

Guests seem pleased!

guests eating.jpg


Edited by Lior (log)

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Lior   

Well, it has been a very busy week, I am sure not only for me. I tried to get the flavor of Israel into the blog, from Cold Labaneh to Hot Levivot, from Bedouin pita and Injera to Lachuch, from humus to Fasole batuta and from routine home life to a few meals outside. There are many more ethnic dishes but my time and blog time are limited! I wish happy holidays to everyone out there. Thank you to those who made kind comments, asked thought provoking questions or just commented on global similarities, or differences. Let's hope the new year will bring peace to the world. Shalom, Salaam.

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Darienne   

Dear Ilana,

Thank you so much for your wonderful blog and for taking so much time to do a blog at such a busy time in your life. Really enjoyed it. Much to think about.

All best, Darienne

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Lior   

Thank you so much Darienne! I really appreciate it-you are so kind and thoughtful-always! :wub:

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Lior   

Kerry! Thank you! Merry christmas to you and your family. You are an amazing incentive for me and always are willing to share and help and give advice. I can never ever show you how much I appreciate your sharing and kind deeds.

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Ladybug   

Wow, thank you - what a great blog!

I found some greens today at the Carmel Market in Tel Aviv and was very happy about that. Thank you! I'm not sure exactly what I have, but they are greens of some sort and I am sure I will like them. I also bought a package of jachnun to try soon. Yay, me!

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Lior   

enjoy, and dont be afraid to try and ask!! :smile:

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Thank you so much for taking the time to share your world with us! Every time I take a peek in, I get HUNGRY! Kudos for all your hard work!

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Lior   

You're very welcome, thank you!

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NancyH   

Thank you, Lior, for this wonderful blog! Wishing you a healthy and happy New Year!

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Lior   

Thank you Nancy H! To you as well. I will go read your blog now!I got a bit distracted this past year from following blogs, and now I am making up lost time.

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heidih   

Thanks for sharing the Romanian meal. Quite meat-centric. Were you able to eat anything?

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nickrey   

Lior, thanks very much for giving us a wonderful glimpse into your world. I love seeing how others live and eat and once again it shows how our world is becoming so diverse through migration: fascinating.

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Ilana, thank you so much for taking the time to share your corner of the world with us. It was fascinating!! I love the diversity you have available to you. And I dare say this is the first time I've ever seen a pregnant camel, no less in a food blog! Of that I am certain! I feel like I know so much more about you and about your part of the world now. I hope I am fortunate enough to visit some day. There is so much I would like to see and explore. Thank you for opening our eyes to it.

Best wishes to you and your family for a healthy, happy and prosperous new year!

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