• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Lior

eG Food Blog: Lior (2011)

198 posts in this topic

Very carefully, would be my answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well I guess that sums it up, leaving out the details, of course!

While my ganache in the hegehogs was hardening I fill these cups with whipped coffee Gianduja. Gianduja is a wonderful sweet. It is made from toasted hazelnuts and chocolate. It is refined to the point of being as smooth as chocolate. It originated in Italy. Gianduja was invented in Turin, in the Piedmont region of Italy which is the major hazelnut-producing area of Italy and where hazelnut confectionary is common. I was first taught about whipping Gianduja by Kerry Beal a few years back. Since then I have been whipping! SO here are the cups to be piped with whipped coffee Gianduja:

chocolate cups.jpg

Tomorrow I will post pictures of the hedgies and the filled cups. I dipped them in dark chocoalted and decorated with lines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just fascinating -- both the Bedouin village and the chocolates! Keep going -- loving it!


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How big of a deal is Chanukah in Israel? I'm told in America it's hyped up a lot to compete with Christmas.

I noticed some of your molds are a bit Christmas-y: the pine tree, reindeer and stocking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh my heavens those hedgehogs have just blown my non-confectioner mind.

I'm curious, is the market for Christmas stuff from Israeli Arab Christians/Palestinian Christians?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I am back after a day of teaching. So as to the questions and comments: I totally agree to positive reinforcement for all species-cannot recall punishing my own kids. I rarely even yelled!! Christmassy molds are for those that do celebrate christmas. It is complicated here. We have new/old immigrants from all over the world and some have spouses that are christian, so these people do celebrate christmas. It is odd, because mostly they come from countries taht were communist so christmas was not really allowed but new years was and so on new years they would put up christmas trees etc. SO here many think that christmas is new year... Then yes, there are arab/palestinian christians who do celebrate christmas. There are also Greek orthodox and others. This is not a population that would buy directly from me by order in general,however, from here and there, there are those who are friends and this is a gift. I never ever sell christmas or hanuka chocolate to friends. If someone I do not know orders, I do sell, but always give extras as it is holiday season.

All holidays in Israel are a big deal, but not in the way it is in the states. Perhaps long ago in the states it was different. less commercial etc and so that is how it is here. Present giving is rarer than common, but money and parties and food giving is common. Kids have no school for the holidays. I will go to shops tomorrow and take photos so you can see how it is.

I realize, Kerry, that porcupines are even worse mating partners,but being a hedge male cannot be too safe either...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Breakfast was rushed a bit today as I have to be in class by 8am. My son, who is home at the moment as he is studyng for psychometric exams as a pre university entrance stage, and he made himself breakfast in a flash of lightening that I missed the opportunity to document! But my youngest, who is in 9th grade, got a breakfast that was documented.

I made her "shakshuka", which is basically an egg in a tomato kind of sauce.

chop up onions, tomatoes,red peppers and dried chili peppers

chop up vegies.jpg

Fry onions and some chili pepper in olive oil

olive oil.jpg

fry onions and chili.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Add the red ppper and after a few minutes, add tomatoes

add peppers.jpg

add tomatoes.jpg

fry well-ish and then add tomato sauce- I use this (which is concentrated tomato paste and some crushed tomatoes with a few herbs

tomato paste.jpg

fry vegies.jpg

add sauce.jpg

add some water,not too much

add water.jpg

add egg or two

add egg.jpg


Edited by Lior (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter is a fussy girl and does not like the yolk runny, so I cook the shakshusha for a minute or two, then I cover the egg with a bit of sauce, and then with a lid for a minute

cook egg and sauce.jpg

cover with sauce

cover egg with sauce.jpg

cover with a lid.jpg

I forgot to add the photo of the spices I used in the sauce

add spices.jpg

Chop vegies

chop vegies1.jpg

chop vegies2.jpg

chop vegies3.jpg

Serve salad with a squeeze of lemon juice,salt and olive oil

chop and serve.jpg

up close

chop and serve2.jpg

breakfast is ready!!! COme down and eat before it gets cooold!!!

breakfast is ready.jpg


Edited by Lior (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love how you get so many vegetables into breakfast - sure beats a bowl of coco pops!


"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, first of all, great start. Second, I love that you can actually buy sauce for shakshuka. Is this your standard way of making it or do you mix it up? (I like to roast poblano peppers and add garlic, which a Moroccan Israeli told me was not correct, but it is delicious. :rolleyes: )

Third, is there any chance you'll have time to show us some sufganiyot? I'd love to see some of the interesting flavours available. Todah!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will show sufganiot, of course! This is my standard way of making it. Often I will make my own tomato sauce, but it tastes quite similar in the end, to be honest. In the morning I need to be quick!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About coffee. I usually don't drink black or mud coffee, and if I do, I add milk. This is horrible to some people (MILK??) akin to the american reaction to milk in tea...

My boys do drink it, but lately they like macchiato. Anyhow, here is how we make the mud coffee.

Finjan and a small glass of water

finjan and water.jpg

At least one pregnant teaspoon of coffee

teaspoon of black coffee.jpg

Sugar to taste, I dont like it sweet, most do...

sugar to taste.jpg

Put in finjan over flame and start heating it all up, stirring here and there

start to heat up.jpg

after a short time

start boiling2.jpg

start boiling3.jpg

When it all rises then it is ready and the aroma is fantastic!

start boiling4.jpg

pour into a small glass! I held it up so that you can kind of see the mud at the bottom (sediment...)

drink coffee.jpg

Post coffee

sediment.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wait. What? So there is no straining? The coffee looks like it's really super finely ground, though. Do you feel the grinds in your mouth when you drink it? Or is it more like sludge?

ETA: Something interesting--the newish Starbucks Via instant coffee lists its ingredients as "instant and microground coffee." So I guess they are doing something similar to this, really!


Edited by Dianabanana (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will show sufganiot, of course! This is my standard way of making it. Often I will make my own tomato sauce, but it tastes quite similar in the end, to be honest. In the morning I need to be quick!

That's great. I wish I could get the sauce here -- I would make shakshuka more often. As it is now, it's a special treat (which I suppose can be a good thing).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wait. What? So there is no straining? The coffee looks like it's really super finely ground, though. Do you feel the grinds in your mouth when you drink it? Or is it more like sludge?

ETA: Something interesting--the newish Starbucks Via instant coffee lists its ingredients as "instant and microground coffee." So I guess they are doing something similar to this, really!

That's essentially just Turkish coffee from the looks of the coffee and pot - the coffee is ground to a superfine powder, and the grounds settle at the bottom of the cup (best to wait a minute before the first sip). When you reach the end you definitely get the sludge, and it's best not to try to get the last drop!

How strange that in Israel the pot is called finjan. In Arabic, Turkish, and possibly Persian, finjan is the cup!

For Lior: in Israel, is it ground with cardamom? Very often in the Arab Levant it is, but never in Turkey.


Edited by Hassouni (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The coffee is as Hassouni described it-exactly. Funny about the finjan! I looked it up and it said that we mistakenly call the pot instead of the cup finjan. The pot is Jazba (?). But that is what it is called here, it seems by mistake... Lots of words here are taken from other languages and then misused in some way. A sweatshirt is called a "svetsher" - a sweatsuit is called a "trenning" (training...)An Applause car is an "apple house" :laugh: SO finjan isn't all that bad!! :wink:

Yes, very often it is with cardamom- the red packet is without, green packet with!We call cardamom-hel


Edited by Lior (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, back to chocolates. I wanted to show the hedgehogs filled with hazelnut milk and dark chocolate ganache:

hedgehogs filled with ganache.jpg

I need to "close" the bottoms of the hedgehog. It looks like the top of the mold, but it is actually the bottom. I use tempered chocolate at its highest temp while still keeping it in temper. If I take the temp too high, it will not be tempered and then it won't be shiny, hard and this is a sin!

hedgehogs closing.jpg

After pouring chocolate onto the mold, I kind os shake and wobble the chocolate along the mold so it runs as far as it can towards the bottom of the mold. If needed I add more chocolate. Then I give it a bang or two with the end of the utensil and then I swipe of the extra chocolate.

hedgehogs closing2.jpg

It is important to keep the molds as clean as possible!

keep mold clean.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The coffee is as Hassouni described it-exactly. Funny about the finjan! I looked it up and it said that we mistakenly call the pot instead of the cup finjan. The pot is Jazba (?). But that is what it is called here, it seems by mistake... Lots of words here are taken from other languages and then misused in some way. A sweatshirt is called a "svetsher" - a sweatsuit is called a "trenning" (training...)An Applause car is an "apple house" :laugh: SO finjan isn't all that bad!! :wink:

Yes, very often it is with cardamom- the red packet is without, green packet with!We call cardamom-hel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By sartoric
      We're 50 something Aussies who enjoy travelling, eating, cooking, markets, kitchen shops, cooking utensils, animals & plants (often food related), architecture & photography (both kitchens and food) and exploring different cultures (of which food is a big part). The trip was January 14 - February 6, it was just marvellous. My favourite meal is now masala dosa with sambar, I had many. Here's some highlights of the food.
       
      A late afternoon snack of Sichuan pepper squid was washed down with a beer at the Ajantha Seaview Hotel on the promenade in Pondicherry. It's a colonial building with a first floor terrace overlooking the colourful display of women in their finest, and the Bay of Bengal. We're here on a Monday public holiday for the Pongal festival, a four day celebration of the harvest, with many different ceremonies and traditions.
       
       

       
      A visual bonus, cows (and sometimes goats) get their horns painted and wear flower garlands or other decorations.

       
    • By Christy Martino
      Ciao!
       
      I'm Christine and I'm a born and bred New Yorker. I’m an Italian by blood (and at heart, of course) since my parents actually came from Italy. My father was from Sciacca, Sicily while my mother was from Sondrio, Lombardy. Despite coming from different regions, or because of it, love for food and cooking has been one of the mainstays in my family home life growing up. And I’ve always loved the dishes my parents prepared during special occasions, and even on regular days.
       
      And of course, I love cooking (and eating) Italian food and I have a few recipes from my mother, but I'd really love to collect some more, especially the traditional ones. And if anyone can contribute some historical background to each dish, that would be really great.
       
      Grazie mille!
    • By Chef Margie
      Hello Everyone!
       
      Happy to join eGullet in hopes to share my passion for culinary and kitchen with others. I have an Instagram account, but I don't think that is enough as I want to learn more, expand, and share my love for food with individuals who share the same passion.
       
      Here is a brief bio about myself: Born and raised in Los Angeles, CA by my Filipino parents. Having no brothers and sisters, I am very independent and surprisingly social with others but also love spending time on my own and with my boyfriend Louis, who is my kitchen partner in crime (this is how we actually met, working BOH at a local Vietnamese restaurant in LA). Having attended college majoring in accounting as an undergrad and grad, I orignally wanted to become a licensed accountant for finance and real estate, but it was not fulfilling and the content honestly bored me to death! I also desired to leave the corporate business world and join the professional kitchen. So I took the leap, graduated culinary school, quit my desk job, and worked in the professional kitchen. Then my health and finances took over, and I had surgery and I needed more money to survive in a city of ridiculous rent prices. I had to leave the kitchen and go back into accounting. Fast forward to 2017, I am currently unemployed having been laid off two days before Christmas the prior year! Using this as a sign and as an opportunity for self growth and realization, I am once again on the culinary path. Not necessarily to work on the line, but to learn more, cook and bake more at home, and expose myself out there to all things food and kitchen. Not also forgetting to mention I am always surrounded by food: Louis is also still in the professional kitchen, and we WILL have that restaurant one day (dreams DO come true, I just know it!).
       
      Anyhow, I am super excited to be posting here and exchanging ideas! See you out there! 
       
      Margie
    • By ElsieD
      We are at the airport waiting to board our flight.  As we seem to have interested folks from different parts of the world who may not know too much about our province,  I thought I would start this blog by giving you an overview of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).
       
      Before Newfoundland  became part of Canada in 1949, it was a British Colony.  Cupids, a town on Conception Bay, was settled 406 years ago, and is the oldest continuously settled official British community in Canada.  Most of the early permanent settlers came from southwest England and southeast Ireland although  the French also settled here and in the 17th century Newfoundland was more French than English.  French is still spoken in Port au Port Penninsula, on the western side of the island, with English spoken everywhere else.   Just off the coast of south west Newfoundland, St. Pierre et Miquelon are islands that are still a colony of France.  There is a regular ferry service between Fortune, NL and St. Pierre et Miquelon.
       
      Geographically, the capital of St. John's is on the same latitude as Paris, France and Seattle, Washington.  In size, Newfoundland and Labrador is a little smaller than California, slightly bigger than Japan and twice the size of the United Kingdon.  NL covers 405,212 sq. kilometers (156,453 sq. miles) with over 29,000 kilometers (18,000 miles) of coastline.  By itself, the island of Newfoundland covers 111,390 square kilometers (43,008 sq. miles).
       
      The population of NL is 510,000, of whom 181,000 live in St. John's.  While there are some larger towns, vast areas are sparsely populated.
       
      In Newfoundland there are no snakes, skunks, racoons, poisonous insects or arachnids.  There is also no ragweed - allergy sufferers rejoice!  There are over 120,000 moose and it is home to one of the world's biggest caribou herds.   They also have some of the continent's biggest black bears.
       
      Note: This information was taken from the official Newfoundland and Labrador web site.
    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.