Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

SpaghettiWestern

Question about dried bean varieties

Recommended Posts

My first experience with white teparys, a very interesting bean, doesn't really taste like anything else - assertive but very different from other white beans (and not at all lentil-like despite what I've read)… 

 

HERE

 

I tried the John Thorne 6-hour method in a clay pot in a 200 degree oven and the beans didn't cook. Moved it up to 225 for 45 minutes, and then finally 250 for 30-45 minutes and then they got perfect. Very simple Tuscan prep. What I did like from Thorne was keeping them "fed" with only a minimum of water (and olive oil), just barely enough to cover, for the entire process. I'm used to using a lot more liquid. I think the beans were more infused with the aromatics and oil, and the broth richer, via this method. 

 

But back to 250F for me I think… in any event, a big vote for RG white teparys!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is kinda dead, but I don't know where to take the news that I've just had my first Rancho Gordo "REMARKABLE" experience.  

 

Just to be clear -- I think RG beans are wonderful, and I'm in full solidarity with the Xoxoc partnership .  But I hadn't really experienced the *REMARKABLE* thing that so many others report, even with the Good Mother Stallards.  (To be fair -- i live in a bean-eating neighborhood, so my basic beans at the grocery store are not ancient.  They are not heirloom, no doubt; but they are not ancient in terms of shelf-time.)

 

Anyway.  No *REMARKABLE*, bean-localized taste, until today.  With, specifically, the Reboseros.  Those are some gooooooood beans, y'all!  

 

Also -- ahem:  https://food52.com/contests/383-your-best-recipe-with-beans

 

Teach, people.


Edited by SLB (log)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is kinda dead, but I don't know where to take the news that I've just had my first Rancho Gordo "REMARKABLE" experience.  

 

Just to be clear -- I think RG beans are wonderful, and I'm in full solidarity with the Xoxoc partnership .  But I hadn't really experienced the *REMARKABLE* thing that so many others report, even with the Good Mother Stallards.  (To be fair -- i live in a bean-eating neighborhood, so my basic beans at the grocery store are not ancient.  They are not heirloom, no doubt; but they are not ancient in terms of shelf-time.)

 

Anyway.  No *REMARKABLE*, bean-localized taste, until today.  With, specifically, the Reboseros.  Those are some gooooooood beans, y'all!  

 

Also -- ahem:  https://food52.com/contests/383-your-best-recipe-with-beans

 

Teach, people.

Several weeks ago I cooked a combination of Reboseros and Moros with excellent results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years ago, I found a good source for South American beans in Japan. Ever since then, I've been trying to decide which I prefer: the little white Panamito beans or the yellow Canary beans (Mayacoba, Peruano are the same beans I think). I end up ordering and using them both. Panamito will cook down into a mush that can be used as a spread or a base; Canaries have a full but mild flavor without the dry grainy texture that Pintos sometimes have. These days my bean larder is kidneys, azuki, garbanzo, Panamito, and Canaries. And occasionally small amounts of tora-mame (Concord Pole Beans), just because they DO have a drier texture, Favas, and scarlet runners, because they are *not* meek and mild, but stick up for themselves in a stew! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm soaking a batch of Yellow Indian Woman beans to cook tomorrow. Any recommended preparation?

 

I have a variety of good stocks in the fridge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently made Yellow Indian Woman beans. I kept the preparation "simple" with a smoked ham hock, a pig's foot, and some chicken stock. Awesome. I do not remember what I served them with, but a nice bone-in pork chop and roasted broccolini sounds very good right now.

The ham hock provided some nice ham bits, and together with the foot gave a nice thick texture to the beans. I always use a Mixteca salt from Rancho Gordo that acts like baking soda to give perfectly formed beans.

But I never soak.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm soaking a batch of Yellow Indian Woman beans to cook tomorrow. Any recommended preparation?...

 

I thought I cooked them in Paula Wolfert's Piedmontese Soup, and posted about it on the dinner thread. Nope, I cooked Yellow Eye beans. But Yellow Eye and Yellow Indian Woman are similar, so I'll include the idea here.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143505-dinner-2010/page-11 -- see post #311

 

Sausage and bean combos speak to me when I think about these beans.

 

You could do a nice bean soup with aromatics (garlic, onion, carrots, olive oil), and some herbs (thyme, savory, sage, and/or rosemary). Towards the end of cooking time, add in some blanched chopped kale and duck sausage; or some chopped tomato and merguez sausage; then let the soup finish cooking. Dust some grated pecorino over the tomato/merguez soup before service.

 

Or you could do a kale and bean soup, then serve in bowls topped with a slice of toasted bread, prosciutto, and a poached egg. Shave some parmesan on top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just received a nice order from, guess who...

 

2015_02 Rancho Gordo beans.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice, Mitch!!!!!

 

I am getting low on my supplies.  Need to place an order soon.   I've never tried the Red Nightfall.  You'll have to let us know if you like 'em.

 

(btw, have you tried the salsa yet?  it looks good!)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bought these and really looking forward to working with them.  Lately I have been looking for beans from Steve's  THE RANCHO GORDO-XOXOC PROJECT

 

Alubia Blanca de San Jose Iturbide

 

Gonna make a Tuscan Bean soup


Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the ideas, folks. Seems like I will be looking for some meat when I go shopping today…will play it by ear. I will report back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice, Mitch!!!!!

 

I am getting low on my supplies.  Need to place an order soon.   I've never tried the Red Nightfall.  You'll have to let us know if you like 'em.

 

(btw, have you tried the salsa yet?  it looks good!)

 

Haven't tried the salsa yet, but I'm probably gonna use it as a condiment for the pot of beans I'm planning on making today.

 

Steve told me that the Eye of the Goat beans are really good, but the harvest this year was meager.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what I did was… soaked 2/3 cup YIW beans overnight as mentioned above, drained and reserved the soaking liquid. Keep the soaking liquid just below the boil in a pot on the stove.

 

Other ingredients:

 

1/4 cup+ olive oil

2 stalks celery, diced

3 small carrots, diced

1 fresh jalapeño, diced

1 small head of garlic, sliced in half "across the equator", only one half used

1 bay leaves

handful of fresh oregano, torn

handful of fresh sage leaves, torn

2 tsp ya cai, chopped

1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper

3 allspice berries, crushed

1 large pinch of kosher salt (prob close to 1 tbs)

1 1/4 cup homemade roast chicken stock

 

I prepared this in an unglazed Rifi tagine.

 

First heat the tagine over a medium-low flame, using a heat diffuser if necessary. Add the olive oil. Add the celery and carrots and soften for about 10 minutes. Add the chunk of garlic head about halfway through. Then add the jalapeño and continue cooking for another 2-3 minutes. Then add the bay leaves, oregano, sage, ya cai, black pepper and allspice and continue simmering for another 1-2 minutes. Finally add the drained beans and stir thoroughly. Now add the chicken stock and stir thoroughly. Add enough reserved bean liquid so that the liquid is just above the level of the beans, increase the heat to the level that you think the tagine can take, and bring to a boil.

 

Cover, reduce heat to minimum, and simmer for 3 hours, checking liquid level and adding a bit of the hot soaking liquid as necessary.

 

Serve with white rice or bread. This was dynamically good: earthy, meaty, creamy and full of umami and depth. (I'd bought hot  Italian sausage and actually browned it and then deglazed that pan with bean liquid, intending to add it - it was totally unnecessary, and will be set aside for a pasta later this week.) Pictures in the dinner thread.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For no reason actually worthy of this thread, I am extremely excited to have some RG Royal Corona's soaking.  I've never had them, and have convinced myself that they are gonna taste as dramatic as they look as they're puckering up . . .

 

Happy summer, y'all.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Royal Coronas rule.

 

I take back everything I said about RG Midnight black beans after trying the SE cooked from dry recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've  recently cooked up a couple good pots of Rancho Gordo beans, but tonight I ran into a problem.  These beans are Ayocote Amarillo.  Beautiful beans.  After five and a half hours the Ayocote Amarillo are still hard and crunchy.  Had to put on a pot of rice and shift to plan B for dinner.  (Plan C is canned Progresso black bean soup.)

 

No acid anywhere near these beans.  Admittedly I did not soak.  Not sure where I went wrong.  Even used filtered water.  The Ayocote Amarillo smell so wonderful.  I'm granting them another hour.

 

On his site Steve says "for some reason Ayocote beans fell out of favor with many Mexicans..."  Could it be because the Ayocote beans don't cook?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are a very starchy bean and they do require extra time and maybe a longer boil up front. 

I'm sorry about your disaster meal! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had those same beans a week or so ago, and because of my work schedule we just do them in the crock all day (boil then drop to a simmer, covered) started at 8am. Perfect. In a separate pot I cooked my house cured bacon with a chopped onion, and threw the whole thing in the beans, grease an all. Delish with a splash of hot sauce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, gfron1 said:

 . . . we just do them in the crock all day (boil then drop to a simmer, covered) started at 8am. Perfect . . . .

 

gfron1, just to ask the obvious, no soak, then? 

 

I have had beans just not cook, though.  It's weird.  Also, I had some perfectly cooked RG Vaqueros from a couple of weeks back -- delicious at the outset -- which, very oddly, seemed to get chalky after a few days in the fridge.  I've never had that happen and have no ideas at all.  Not that this stopped me from finishing them. 

 

Meanwhile -- the Bean of The Week that's getting cooked tomorrow is Purcell Rattlesnake.  I could live on pinto beans, I love them so much, and I've heard such good things about the intensified flavor of rattlesnake beans, I can't wait.   I'm having folks over for [drunk] brunch on Sunday, and I think we're having bean enchiladas, depending on how the Rattlesnakes turn out. Possibly with some chicken if I can find some in the freezer.  And definitely with some Meyer lemon margaritas, since we have the Meyer lemons these days.


Edited by SLB (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, rancho_gordo said:

They are a very starchy bean and they do require extra time and maybe a longer boil up front. 

I'm sorry about your disaster meal! 

 

Thanks.  I let the  Ayocote Amarillo cook thirty six hours in the olla, after being boiled hard for fifteen minutes.  No joy, but at least less crunchy than the night before.

 

On the bright side, today FedEx delivered thirteen pounds of beans from you, none of which were Ayocote.  So sad, because the Ayocote Amarillo smelled so good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Thanks.  I let the  Ayocote Amarillo cook thirty six hours in the olla, after being boiled hard for fifteen minutes.  No joy, but at least less crunchy than the night before.

 

On the bright side, today FedEx delivered thirteen pounds of beans from you, none of which were Ayocote.  So sad, because the Ayocote Amarillo smelled so good.

That is one bean variety that I cook in the pressure cooker.  I have an electric one and I cook them on high pressure for 45 minutes and they are still intact and not at all mushy.  I then put them in a crock with "additives" and make baked beans.  Even after the cooking in the oven they are still intact.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

That is one bean variety that I cook in the pressure cooker.  I have an electric one and I cook them on high pressure for 45 minutes and they are still intact and not at all mushy.  I then put them in a crock with "additives" and make baked beans.  Even after the cooking in the oven they are still intact.  

 

I'm so glad that I am not the only one!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, SLB said:

gfron1, just to ask the obvious, no soak, then? 

I never soak my beans, ever, no variety, nope. Not gonna do it.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh wow, 45 minutes in the pressure cooker???  That's wild.  

 

Admittedly -- I have never used an electric pressure cooker, maybe they are different?  I've only ever used my beloved and also becoming-ancient Presto, which cooks garbanzos to done in about 16 minutes, medium-rocking.  Garbanzos are really the only bean I typically pressure-cook. So 45 minutes is blowing my mind.

 

But, dang.  I have the RG Ayocote Amarillos though I've not made them yet; the need to plan differently is duly noted.  

 

I also have, unopened, the  RG Ayocote Blanco and Morado; for my own weird reasons I generally eat the larger beans in the summer, so haven't cooked since my autumn shipment.  

 

That said, the one other RG Ayocote that I have made is the Negro.  It did not take a notably long time to cook (plain-boiled, not pressure-cooked).  I do soak, though, religiously; for whatever that's worth.  

 

The two beans that I made that never got done were a black turtle bean that I bought in a neighborhood in Jackson, MS, where really no one ate those beans; could've been on the shelf for aeons.  The other one was a pinto bean that was purchased in Montgomery, Alabama, in a neighborhood with plenty of shelf-turnover.  I don't know what the hell happened there, but I consulted with friends-who-cook-beans, and they didn't know either.  Around that time I was playing around with dark beer in pinto beans, but I have no idea if I put beer into those particular beans, or how that would make that one batch eternally chalky.  I know I was mad, tho.


Edited by SLB (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×