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heidih

heidih

16 hours ago, Miriravan said:

I have a bag of 'gaucho' beans I picked up at my local farmers market, probably last summer, because hey!  Local beans!  They are very small (like quarter-inch average), reddish-brown beans, and there is no indication on the bag what sort of cooked beans they make (e.g. do they hold their shape, what sort of texture do they have, what applications are they suitable for). 

 

A google search gives me a couple entries from seed sites that say they are from Argentina, ripen early, and give good yields--nice to know, but not really helpful in a culinary sense. 

 

Obviously I can just cook them up simply and see what I end up with, but I figured I'd see if anybody has experience of this variety before I start experimenting. 

 

Thanks in advance for any insights!

 

No idea where you are at but they sound very similar to the little pinquito beans that are traditional with tri-tip BBQ in our central coast area..  http://www.westcoastprimemeats.com/santa-maria-tri-tip-recipe   and   https://santamariavalley.com/news/the-scoop-on-santa-maria-pinquito-beans/

heidih

heidih

16 hours ago, Miriravan said:

I have a bag of 'gaucho' beans I picked up at my local farmers market, probably last summer, because hey!  Local beans!  They are very small (like quarter-inch average), reddish-brown beans, and there is no indication on the bag what sort of cooked beans they make (e.g. do they hold their shape, what sort of texture do they have, what applications are they suitable for). 

 

A google search gives me a couple entries from seed sites that say they are from Argentina, ripen early, and give good yields--nice to know, but not really helpful in a culinary sense. 

 

Obviously I can just cook them up simply and see what I end up with, but I figured I'd see if anybody has experience of this variety before I start experimenting. 

 

Thanks in advance for any insights!

 

No idea where you are at but they sound very simlar to the little pinquito beans that are traditional with tri-tip BBQ in our central coast area..  http://www.westcoastprimemeats.com/santa-maria-tri-tip-recipe   and   https://santamariavalley.com/news/the-scoop-on-santa-maria-pinquito-beans/

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