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jnash85

"The PDT Cocktail Book"

216 posts in this topic

Tonight I tried Gerry Corcoran's #3 Cup (Cognac, ginger beer, curaçao, sweet vermouth, Cherry Heering, lemon juice, mint, cuke, orange). It tasted like a kale smoothie.

"It tasted like a kale smoothie"... so Gerry Corcoran's #3 Cup is now marked as one not to try.

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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In all honesty, it's not a pan. I've enjoyed a kale smoothie in my time.

That said, fair warning to those who react as Mr. 2Cook did.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Blackbeard

Beefeater, Aquavit, Lemon juice, pineapple jiuce, agave nectar, blackberries.

IMG_6402.jpg

 

Oops, made it a bit wrong muddling in the shaker and straining, but still was a nice drink. Subbed SS for Agave nectar.


Edited by pto (log)

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The Blackbeard looks interesting, although I have a fear of pineapple juice. But without it, I suppose it's just a Bramble with aquavit, which sounds pretty good actually.

 

This one is nothing offensive, mostly a major snooze. (I wanted to kill my bottle of Plymouth in a vague attempt to streamline the liquor cabinet.) I suppose it would be a good drink to introduce people to gin or cocktails in general.

Vieux Mot (Don Lee): Plymouth gin, lemon juice, St. Germain, simple syrup.

 

15741489489_eeb6d06d92_z.jpg

 

Anthony Schmidt used to do something similar at Noble Experiment as a long drink with muddled cucumber called Easy Street, which is in the Bartender's Choice app.

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The Blackbeard looks interesting, although I have a fear of pineapple juice. But without it, I suppose it's just a Bramble with aquavit, which sounds pretty good actually.

 

It is pretty pineapply, I was thinking of cutting it back a little next time.

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Rattlesnake last night with the PDT ratios.

2 oz Rittenhouse rye bottled in bond, 1 oz lemon juice, 3/4 oz simple syrup, egg white, rinse Vieux Pontarlier Absinthe (St. George absinthe).

 

15372626404_5d682ba715_z.jpg

 

I love this cocktail and Rittenhouse is perfect in this. With the creamy egg white it's like an adult smoothie. (I don't follow PDT's prep procedure. I use a stick blender, much easier.)

 

Good recap of various Rattlesnake recipes on reddit.

 

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Hey, I just made a PDT Rattlesnake! Delicious and a little weird--hard to pick out the Rittenhouse and absinthe. This is one where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Very nice.

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Haven't checked into eG recently - glad to see this thread was still active! I (almost) made a Conquistador tonight - it's an egg white drink and I didn't want to bother with it so I didn't use it. Tequila, aged rum, lemon juice, lime juice, simple, house orange bitters (1/2 Regans 1/2 Fees). I used a resposado tequila instead of blanco, but even with that substitution it was damn tasty. Surprisingly vegetal (in a good way). FrogPrincesse - I saw your comment on the drink in EYB which is why I tried it. I hope you are still posting comments there - I value your opinion!

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Haven't checked into eG recently - glad to see this thread was still active! I (almost) made a Conquistador tonight - it's an egg white drink and I didn't want to bother with it so I didn't use it. Tequila, aged rum, lemon juice, lime juice, simple, house orange bitters (1/2 Regans 1/2 Fees). I used a resposado tequila instead of blanco, but even with that substitution it was damn tasty. Surprisingly vegetal (in a good way). FrogPrincesse - I saw your comment on the drink in EYB which is why I tried it. I hope you are still posting comments there - I value your opinion!

I most definitely am. I left about 75 comments on PDT cocktails on EYB. :-)

Most recently, I've been busy with the Death & Co Cocktail Book which is great. I am also adding my comments to EYB (and eG of course). I am glad to read that they are useful to other people!

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Hot off the presses, the PDT Cocktail app (a collaboration with Martin Doudoroff) is here.

Says Doudoroff:

PDT Cocktails is a legacy. The recipes comprise pretty much all the original drinks ever served at PDT as well as the fine-tuned classics PDT has featured on their menus.

Included are four hundred precise, carefully-worded drink recipes spanning all of PDT’s eight years of service

Every one of the recipes was re-tested by Jim Meehan and his staff for this anthology

Every drink was carefully photographed, documenting PDT’s choice of glassware and garniture (“We taste with our eyes first,”—Jim Meehan)

Nearly every ingredient was photographed, too, to provide a visual reference (!)

This is a flagship app—exactly what you would expect from the first James Beard Award-winning bar program—and a leading document of the contemporary “craft” cocktail movement.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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This last week I've been going on a "make what I can from PDT with the stuff I've got" run through the book. We made a Cloister (very nice with the Junipero) and a couple Milk Punches (supremely quaffable after dinner drink, pairs nicely with a bowl of raspberries). Mostly though, this week has resulted in a lot of Improved Whiskey Cocktails and an almost empty Rittenhouse bottle. Not sure if the proportions are original to PDT, but I like it:

 

2 oz Rittenhouse

.25 oz Luxardo Maraschino

.25 oz simple syrup (scant)

2 dashes Angostura Bitters (I use one dash Ango and one dash Bitter Punk Alpino*)

absinthe rinse (St. George)

 

*We picked up the Bitter Punk Alpino bitters last time we were in Denver. (They're from Boulder, Colorado, I guess.) It's got pine characteristics, hence the name, but also a fair amount of citrus peel, some grassy herbaceous notes (playing well with the maraschino),  and maybe a bit of cardamom? And it's, for lack of a better word, just more "bitter" than the ango.


Edited by Fernet-Bronco (log)
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IMG_7301.jpg

21st Century, Agaveles Blanco tequila, Lemon juice, Creme de Cacao, Ricard rinse.

 

Not sure I'd make it again, but enjoyable none the less.

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Tonight I had a Pearl of Puebla by Jim Meehan (Sombra mezcal, yellow Chartreuse, lime, oregano, Ricard, agave). Perfect. Delicious.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I know this is an older thread, but hoping there's still a few folks around :)  

 

I have the book, but I've read online that the PDT app has a bunch of updates regarding the ingredients/proportions of the drinks that are in the book (such as replacing Marie Brizard Curacao with Pierre Ferrand).  There isn't much info about the differences between the book and the app recipes, can anyone who has both shine some light on whether the app is worth it (and are the recipes actually different for the better on the app)?   Thanks!

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The app is worth it. In addition to the revised recipes, there are more than a hundred newer drinks, and photographs for new and old drinks alike.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Looks like I'm going to have to find a way.  I've got all android/PC products, and PDT only made an iOS app :(

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