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Muffins & holiday bread – freeze?


sabg
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i just made a million muffins (not quite) and some cranberry n pumpkin breads for thanksgiving...trying to get ahead of the game and now realize its only monday...should i freeze them or just put them in fridge or bag on the counter.....the time for this question was before the oven went on but need help, thanks

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I freeze muffins all the time, and I think it works pretty well. If you slightly under-bake them initially, you can let them brown a little more when they re-heat. I usually reheat them for 20-30 minutes at 300-350.

The pumpkin bread will be good in the fridge for about a week or so, but you might want to freeze if it's going to be longer than that (I think the texture actually improves a little with refrigeration for quickbreads, but not as much for muffins).

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Freeze them.

To bring them back to the ideal serving state, defrost them completely, pre-heat your oven to 375° F., place the muffins in a brown paper bag and put the bag in the oven for 8-10 minutes - for a dozen or so regular sized muffins.

It's better to do them in batches. If they are jumbo muffins, it takes 12 to 15 minutes for them to warm through.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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You know, this was something I was sort of wondering about. I've been making scones for some time now by making the dough, forming it into bars, and freezing. When I have over some company or want to bring someone a few fresh baked scones, I'll thaw them, brush with cream, and bake. Is there any reason I couldn't do this same thing with muffins? I mean make the batter, portion them into cups in the pan, freeze them, pop them out of the pan and just keep in the freezer, and when I want thaw a few in the muffin pan, and pop into the oven? I usually just like to bake and average of 4 scone type items at a time, I dont like doing large batches.

On a separate note, what can I sub for buttermilk in a muffin recipe? I really never have buttermilk on hand, but almost always have heavy cream. I have a few muffin recipes that call for buttermilk, so I just dont make them, is there a something that will give me comparable results, perhaps 1/2 milk and 1/2 cream? I made the blueberry muffin recipe from On Cooking, which came out nicely, but the tops didnt really seem to brown, they were rather blond when they were fully baked. Anyways, just wondering about a substitution on the buttermilk. Thanks guys.

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You know, this was something I was sort of wondering about. I've been making scones for some time now by making the dough, forming it into bars, and freezing. When I have over some company or want to bring someone a few fresh baked scones, I'll thaw them, brush with cream, and bake. Is there any reason I couldn't do this same thing with muffins? I mean make the batter, portion them into cups in the pan, freeze them, pop them out of the pan and just keep in the freezer, and when I want thaw a few in the muffin pan, and pop into the oven? I usually just like to bake and average of 4 scone type items at a time, I dont like doing large batches.

Should be fine. Just remember to thaw and bring the batter close to room temperature before baking. Even more reliable if you use double-acting baking powder. Baking powder is formulated to start rising immediately when the mixture is moistened. Double-acting will have a second rising-powder reaction when heat is added.

Karen Dar Woon

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You know, this was something I was sort of wondering about. I've been making scones for some time now by making the dough, forming it into bars, and freezing. When I have over some company or want to bring someone a few fresh baked scones, I'll thaw them, brush with cream, and bake. Is there any reason I couldn't do this same thing with muffins? I mean make the batter, portion them into cups in the pan, freeze them, pop them out of the pan and just keep in the freezer, and when I want thaw a few in the muffin pan, and pop into the oven? I usually just like to bake and average of 4 scone type items at a time, I don't like doing large batches.

Should be fine. Just remember to thaw and bring the batter close to room temperature before baking. Even more reliable if you use double-acting baking powder. Baking powder is formulated to start rising immediately when the mixture is moistened. Double-acting will have a second rising-powder reaction when heat is added.

Brilliant idea. :smile: Now why have I never thought of that? (no answer, please) I have whipped up two batches of muffins...chopping nuts, shredding carrots, etc...in the last few days to give to our stalwart outdoor renovation workers...it's cold in east central Ontario...and it would have been handy if the muffin batter had already been frozen in papers as my own days are full of massive confusion right now.

Thank you muchly, minas6907.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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