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nickrey

"Eleven Madison Park: The Cookbook"

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I realised at maybe 3am that I forgot to actually take a photo. Anyway. I had no plans to serve the dish as it's described in the book--I was going to serve it and a couple sides and leave dinner at that--but I wanted to retain most of the elements in some form. I prepared the ragu as it was detailed in the recipe, altho' I did have to braise it for the best part of three hours before the meat was happy to part from the bone. Altho' that sort of variation is normal: could be, the (wild) hare I had was a just that little bit older and tougher than whatever they buy in for the restaurant.

I didn't use any pig's blood in the sauce. The only butcher I know of that sells the stuff has plastic tubs of 'blood jelly' sitting around for very long periods of time (it's not a popular item, as you can imagine). I wasn't too confident about using such a product. Next time I'd probably make up for the lack of blood flavour in the sauce by maybe buying some nice blood sausage or something.

For the torchon I used a bloc of foie mousse I had sitting around. It did the job.

In place of the truffles I had a side of nice mushrooms jacked with a little porcini powder and in place of the potato mousse I made some retrograded mashed potatoes (purely because I don't have a siphon).

I was happy with the dish overall, altho' next time I think I'd lose the corn starch from the chocolate sauce and sub in some xantham gum or something. Or, you know, just allow the heavily reduced chicken stock to do its thing and thicken the sauce without any added ingredients. One thing that drives me nuts about the book, and possibly prevents me from using it more often, is the cups/tablespoons business. Who the shit measures currants by volume?

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Baselerd   

Yeah, it's a bit annoying - although he uses weight measurements for the stuff that really matters (modern thickeners & gelling agents) usually. I can usually just use my intuition on most other things ... no real harm is done if you have a 5% error on your currant measurement.

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rotuts   

finally got this book out of the lib.

mm: these guys have been stealing your stuff!

outrageous !

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tammylc   

I'm planning to make the sweet potato beignets for a dinner party on Friday. I'm wondering about their suitability for advance prep. The timing seems fiddly with the instructions to freeze for 30 minutes, roll into balls, then coat in panko. If I refrigerate them after this step, will they hold their shape for frying a la minute? Should I just fully freeze them in the first step, and pull them early to allow them to soften before rolling and frying?

I'm sure the restaurant has them prepped and ready to pop in the fryer, so just trying to figure out the best method for doing that. Anyone have experience/opinion?

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Baselerd   

I recently made one of the hors d'oeuvres from the book - chicken liver cracklings. First, some chicken skin is roasted in the oven between two parchment-lined sheets until crispy. It is served with some chicken liver mousse and garnished with pickled mushrooms (I used some shiitake pickles instead of enoki), a red grape slice, chives, and shaved frozen foie gras. I didn't have any black truffles, so I drizzled it with some truffle oil.

It turned out really tasty, but super rich. Perhaps I served it with too much liver mousse, but it was a bit much for me. With that said, the recipe makes a TON of liver mousse. The stuff is amazing, and will probably be my go-to recipe for pate, etc.

tumblr_mvcpn4eDez1rvhqcjo1_1280.jpg

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nickrey   

Last night I made up the Beef Roasted Tenderloin with Bone Marrow Crust, Swiss Chard and Chanterelles.

 

The Tenderloin was substituted with some skirt that I had bound together into a tenderloin shape with transglutaminese (and cooked for 20 hours rather than the 30 minutes for the tenderloin) and the chanterelles were substituted with cubes of portobello but all the other elements were as per the recipe.

 

As usual, there were many processes involved and cooking took a long while but once again the product was spectacular.

 

Everything I've made from the book has been top class in terms of flavour and presentation.

 

Sorry there is no picture. One of the guests took one so I'll see if I can get it to post.


Edited by nickrey (log)

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Cauliflower Roasted with Grapes, Almonds and Curry.

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Beef with Bone Marrow Crust, Swiss Chard and Braised Oxtail.

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HI, was wondering how you cooked the sous vide cauliflower?  Do you have a combi steam oven?  I do not, and was wondering if i was to sous vide it for 20 min @185 if it would work the same?

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