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What's Your Favorite Olive?


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So today I was snacking on some assorted olives, which I often do, seeing as how healthy they are :wink: . There were about 5 or 6 different olives in the batch; some sweet and fruity, some dry and funky - you get the picture.

I think I've decided that my favorite olive is the Cerignola - especially the green ones. Might be because they're huge, but probably more so because they're so damn tasty.

Do you have a favorite olive? And why?

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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My favourites are the ones I grew up with in Florence, but I have no idea of what they're called. They've very small, black olives, preserved in oil, with thin, firm flesh, smooth, not wrinkly skins, and not bitter, but a very full olive-y flavour. I have trouble even finding them in Florence, now, so I wonder whether they're a varietal that just isn't prolific or robust enough to be attractive from a contemporary business standpoint.

If anyone does know what these are called, I'd love to know.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Oh, and I wanted to add that I always rinse olives; sometimes I soak them. And then, if I have the time (and they're not going into a Martini), I'll marinate them in some olive oil, herbs, maybe a hint of orange rind, etc.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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The little green 'spanish' ones that are stuffed with anchovies.

Kalamatas chopped into things for little random zings of salt and richness.

Jumbo black ripe olives. Love that butter-like richness.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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No idea what they're called, but the olives that can be found all over Lebanon and in Lebanese stores, especially the slightly bitter, smallish green ones cured with what I think is thyme and some other things.

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There is no way I could choose just one. I like them all, impossible to pick a favorite.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Love castelvetranos (also sold as nocellara del belice). Also crazy about the green cerignolas--when they are crunchy, and taste fresh and a little chlorinated, like a clean swimming pool. When they are soft I don't find them so appealing.

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Whether I soak depends on the olives, for me. For the types that have a lot of salt in the cure, absolutely.

My personal favourites at the moment are the tiny, firm black olives that are produced locally from the trees around the Cathedral, cured with a minimum of salt and with mixed herbs and allspices. They're fabulous.

In terms of olives that y'all will recognize, Kalamatas, hands down.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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So today I was snacking on some assorted olives, which I often do, seeing as how healthy they are :wink: . There were about 5 or 6 different olives in the batch; some sweet and fruity, some dry and funky - you get the picture.

I think I've decided that my favorite olive is the Cerignola - especially the green ones. Might be because they're huge, but probably more so because they're so damn tasty.

Do you have a favorite olive? And why?

Are these the bright green ones that also come in a red variety? If so these are my favorite as well. My MIL always brings me some back from her hometown Naples. Great now I'm craving them!

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For big black olives I love Alfonsos. For green olives the small Lebanese have a buttery richness that I adore. Nicoise are also good. Kalamata are a nice "safe" olive -- almost everyone has them and even the jarred ones are good. When we lived in NJ we made a bi-weekly trek to Nouris, a Lebanese market in Paterson, that has a huge array of olives in giant tubs that can be sampled before buying. Big green, little green, cracked green, huge fat black ones, little wrinkled black ones, medium purple ones. I miss that! Haven't found anything quite comparable yet in Toronto, although there are good Greek olives aplenty. Still haven't found any Alfonsos tho.

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The first olives I had that weren't just the generic "black" and "Spanish (aka stuffed green) were Graber olives. I haven't had them in years, and I have no idea if they would still be as good now as they were then, but I remember them as being irresistible.

Now, I like almost any olives -- I'm not a huge fan of the little salt-cured black ones (whatever they're called), but that's about the only kind I've tasted that I didn't like.

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