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heidih

Percyn's travels (2011) continued

58 posts in this topic

I'd like to see some Indian Chinese food. How are the flavours different from American Chinese (or even "authentic" Chinese food in the US) Or are they?

And what was in that Frankie? Frankfurters?

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And in the second picture under the Borhi Muhllah section, what are those things that are rolled up? They look like large spring rolls, but I'm guessing they're rolled roti filled with meat? And are the square ones like murtabak?

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I'd like to see some Indian Chinese food. How are the flavours different from American Chinese (or even "authentic" Chinese food in the US) Or are they?

And what was in that Frankie? Frankfurters?

Rona,

Think of a mix of Sichuan (without the Sichuan peppercorns) and Indian flavors. A popular dish is "Manchurian" which consists of a meat or fish or paneer with onions, peppers, garlic, ginger, green chilies, garham masala, soy sauce, etc.

Manchurian Chicken

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Beef

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American Chop suey, a tomato based sweet, sour, spicy sauce over crispy noodles and a fried egg on the left

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As for the Frankie, it was chicken in a spicy sauce, similar to chicken tikka.


Edited by percyn (log)

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And in the second picture under the Borhi Muhllah section, what are those things that are rolled up? They look like large spring rolls, but I'm guessing they're rolled roti filled with meat? And are the square ones like murtabak?

The rolls are "Mutton Rolls", which is also shown in the last picture of the same post. It consists of a thin roti with egg wash, rolled with a goat mince. Unlike a springroll, this was delicate and just melted in your mouth. It was truly delicious and so cheap (less than $1).

The square ones are indeed murtabak, popularly called Beida (egg) roti.

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Leopalds as mentioned in shantaram right?! Sooo glad you are keeping this blog up percyn!


"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

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Leopalds as mentioned in shantaram right?! Sooo glad you are keeping this blog up percyn!

Yes, the same Leopold's Cafe as featured in Shantaram. I have not met Gregory David Roberts (though it is possible we were at the same venues without being introduced), nor have I read his book, but plan to as he seems like an interesting character.

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You really should read Shantaram - my sister who was never a big reader literally sat me down and forced me to read it and I'm glad she did. Regardless of how true to life it is, he writes about India beautifully and I'm sure you'd really enjoy it!


"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

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