Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Chinese in Vancouver 2007 -


Recommended Posts

In Richmond: Sea Harbour, Shanghai River, Kirin and Sun Sui Wah are solid choices. Shanghai River looks the fanciest of the lot IMO.

I would love to find a place that does Beijing Imperial Cuisine here (eg Tan Jia). I don't know of any, personally.

Thanks fmed - I'll have to try Sun Sui Wah again. It's an old standby but I haven't been there for ages.

I second the call for a place that serves tanjiacai!

健啖家(kentan-ka):A hearty eater

He was a wise man who invented beer." - Plato

Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sure it is SSW Richmond that you go to - NOT the one on Main St. In Richmond - there is also Jade Seafood - the service is impeccable and their "Great Grandfather's Chicken" quite excellent.

Otherwise - there are Shanghainese places like Shanghai River (mentioned above), and Shanghai Wonderful - both in Richmond with reasonably nice rooms. There are also Tawainese places like Dinesty and Vogue with clean modern spaces.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
Otherwise - there are Shanghainese places like Shanghai River (mentioned above), and Shanghai Wonderful - both in Richmond with reasonably nice rooms.  There are also Tawainese places like Dinesty and Vogue with clean modern spaces.

I'm a fan of Shanghai Wonderful. The soup dumplings (Xiao long bao) are highly soupy and packed with flavour. They also do one of the better hot and sour soups out there (with actual chunks of seafood). Try it there and redefine what hot and sour soup is supposed to be like :biggrin:

Cunucklehead is right about Jade, it's a bit of an unsung hero in most cases. When you go there for Dim Sum, it's woefully underpacked compared to many other joints in the area and I find the price premium is well worth the jump in food quality (plus easy/free parking).

"There are two things every chef needs in the kitchen: fish sauce and duck fat" - Tony Minichiello

Link to post
Share on other sites

We discovered a very good Chinese restaurant on Renfrew at East 2nd called Bing Sheng.

It's quite authentic serving local dishes you expect to see in southern parts of China.

In fact, it's so good that we offered to help them do up menu translations into English.

Reasonable prices, they even let you weigh your king crab before ordering. But then, I guess one can never be 100% certain if the weighted crab is the same as the cooked one..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any place in YVR that does tableside-carved Peking duck with skin only? It really shouldn't have meat, but it's getting harder and harder to find it without (even in Hong Kong, where I thought I'd be able to get it without meat!).

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I had Beiing koaya they carved up the whole bird at the table and even chopped up the bones (we took the left over meat and bones as take away and had it with our morning meal).

159389f564.jpg

The skin is the best part though :wub: .

Does any place in YVR do this?

Edited by Country Cook (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
When I had Beiing koaya they carved up the whole bird at the table and even chopped up the bones (we took the left over meat and bones as take away and had it with our morning meal).

...

The skin is the best part though  :wub: .

Does any place in YVR do this?

Do you mean a duck carved tableside then served multi-course?...I guess Beng Sheng discussed above (which used to be Renfrew Dim Sum where the did this) and Luxe (in Langely). I'd love to know of any others.

fmed

de gustibus non est disputandum

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Bing Sheng at Renfrew and 2nd is actually an offshot of the one in Richmond

After several weeks of growing pains they are now almost up to speed

Prices are reasonable due to the competition from East #1 across the street

Link to post
Share on other sites

The same management team runs Schezawn restaurant on Saba road - but the food is very very different. Bing Sheng is a famous restaurant in Guandong - and the manager was talking to us about what they could recreate here vs what they serve in China - but it may be a bit of name borrowing.

I went tonight and the food was outstanding. The farmhouse rustic dishes are very different from most other HK influenced Cantonese restaurants in Vancouver. The place is packed most nights - I think they are the best Eastside Chinese restaurant right now.

Edited by canucklehead (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...
The same management team runs Schezawn restaurant on Saba road - but the food is very very different. Bing Sheng is a famous restaurant in Guandong - and the manager was talking to us about what they could recreate here vs what they serve in China - but it may be a bit of name borrowing.

I went tonight and the food was outstanding. The farmhouse rustic dishes are very different from most other HK influenced Cantonese restaurants in Vancouver.  The place is packed most nights  - I think they are the best Eastside Chinese restaurant right now.

I went to Bing Sheng a few nights ago. We ordered a tofu & mushrooms dish, beef with ginger in a clay dish, and a fried noodles dish -- only the tofu was good. Perhaps I didn't order correctly, but I was very disappointed, as were my Shanghainese friends!

Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend of mine says that the S&W Restaurant in Kerrisdale (right below Golden Ocean) now serves Hunan food.  Her parents (who are Cantonese) went - but were warned away from anything too spice, and so ended ordering very blandly - but they saw plates piled high with chili's served to other tables.  And they knew that they had been steered wrong.  Has anyone been?

S&W looks like they've closed. Either that, or they've undergone a name change. It's now called Szechuan something or other (sorry, can't remember the name). Noticed the change a month or two ago. Anyone been since then?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I went to Bing Sheng a few nights ago.  We ordered a tofu & mushrooms dish, beef with ginger in a clay dish, and a fried noodles dish -- only the tofu was good.  Perhaps I didn't order correctly, but I was very disappointed, as were my Shanghainese friends!

Isn't that always the case with Chinese places? You have some great meals and get excited about a new restaurant. But then, inexplicably, it all goes downhill very quickly.

Say what you will about places like Sun Sui Wah and Kirin, but they are reliable and consistent.

Edited by Hestia (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
I went to Bing Sheng a few nights ago.  We ordered a tofu & mushrooms dish, beef with ginger in a clay dish, and a fried noodles dish -- only the tofu was good.  Perhaps I didn't order correctly, but I was very disappointed, as were my Shanghainese friends!

Isn't that always the case with Chinese places? You have some great meals and get excited about a new restaurant. But then, inexplicably, it all goes downhill very quickly.

Say what you will about places like Sun Sui Wah and Kirin, but they are reliable and consistent.

A lot of Chinese restaurants go through chefs like they go through shirts. You can always tell if there's a new cook if the food has changed.

For larger restaurants, they could also have multiple cooks and the cook who made your dishes one time, won't be the one who makes them the next time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Several years ago my husband and I had an incredible meal at Grand King Seafood on West Broadway. In fact, if my memory serves me correctly, we ate there twice. It was amazingly good. We shall be in Vancouver again in September and can find no trace of Chef Lam Kam Shing. Does anyone know if he is still in Vancouver and, if so, at which restaurant?

Ruth Friedman

Link to post
Share on other sites
Several years ago my husband and I had an incredible meal at Grand King Seafood on West Broadway. In fact, if my memory serves me correctly, we ate there twice. It was amazingly good. We shall  be in Vancouver again in September and can find no trace of Chef Lam Kam Shing. Does anyone know if he is still in Vancouver and, if so, at which restaurant?

I would love to know where is cooking now too.

fmed

de gustibus non est disputandum

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

I've been going to the S&W Restaurants for some good old Northern Chinese food, nice and spicy, so it's perfect winter dining for me. One dish to check out for sure is the peanut and cilantro salad. It is completely delicous. Brightly vinegared with preserved veggies, savory peanuts, and fresh herbal cilantro. Totally addictive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I must try this dish. I go the the S&W Pepper House on the lower level of Crystal Mall and I always end up over-stuffing myself ('cause I go to Wang's upstairs for an order of XLB as well.)

fmed

de gustibus non est disputandum

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I have my list of Cantonese places that I like tremendously - but I wanted to get a guage of where people are going for their fix of spicy Sichuan and Hunan.

I continue to really like Alvin Garden, who also do a very good smoked duck. I like Golden Sichuan in Richmond, and S&W Pepper House in Richmond for their cilantro peanut salad (but not over tilapia, which is inedibly muddy tasting). I've been told Szechuan Restaurant on Cambie is good - but I went to their sister restaurant in Burnaby a while ago and was not super impressed. I really like the buzz of Sichuan peppercorn - but I find many places are a little light handed with it.

Is there anywhere I should be checking out?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      I've recently become aware of the existence of this chain of Xi'an restaurants in NewYork. Are there more elsewhere?
       
      They were recenty referenced in a BBC article about biang biang noodles.
       
    • By liuzhou
      Following my posting a supermarket bought roast rabbit in the Dinner topic, @Anna N expressed her surprise at my local supermarkets selling such things just like in the west supermarkets sell rotisserie chickens. I promised to photograph the pre-cooked food round these parts.

      I can't identify them all, so have fun guessing!



      Rabbit
       

      Chicken x 2
       

       

       

      Duck
       

       

       

      Chicken feet
       

      Duck Feet
       

      Pig's Ear
       

       

      Pork Intestine Rolls
       

       

      Stewed River Snails
       

      Stewed Duck Feet (often served with the snails above)


       

      Beef
       

      Pork
       

      Beijing  Duck gets its own counter.
       
      More pre-cooked food to come. Apologies for some bady lit images - I guess the designers didn't figure on nosy foreigners inspecting the goods and disseminating pictures worldwide.
    • By liuzhou
      While there have been other Chinese vegetable topics in the past, few of them were illustrated And some which were have lost those images in various "upgrades".
       
      What I plan to do is photograph every vegetable I see and say what it is, if I know. However, this is a formidable task so it'll take time. The problem is that so many vegetables go under many different Chinese names and English names adopted from one or other Chinese language, too. For example, I know four different words for 'potato' and know there are more. And there are multiple regional preference in nomenclature. Most of what you will see will be vegetables from supermarkets, where I can see the Chinese labelling. In "farmer's" or wet markets, there is no labelling and although, If I ask, different traders will have different names for the same vegetable. Many a time I've been supplied a name, but been unable to find any reference to it from Mr Google or his Chinese counterparts. Or if I find the Chinese, can't find an accepted translation so have to translate literally.
       
      Also, there is the problem that most of the names which are used in the English speaking countries have, for historical reasons, been adopted from Cantonese, whereas 90% of Chinese speak Mandarin (普通话 pǔ tōng huà). But I will do my best to supply as many alternative names as I can find. I shall also attempt to give Chinese names in simplified Chinese characters as used throughout mainland China and then in  traditional Chinese characters,  now mainly only used in Hong Kong, Taiwan and among much of the Chinese diaspora. If I only give one version, that means they are the same in Simp and Trad.
       
      I'll try to do at least one a day. Until I collapse under the weight of vegetation.
       
      Please, if you know any other names for any of these, chip in. Also, please point out any errors of mine.
       
      I'll start with bok choy/choy. This is and alternatives such as  pak choi or pok choi are Anglicised attempts at the Cantonese pronunciation of the Mandarin! However in Cantonese it is more often 紹菜; Jyutping: siu6 coi3. In Chinese it is 白菜. Mandarin Pinyin 'bái cài'. This literally means 'white vegetable' but really just means 'cabbage' and of course there are many forms of cabbage. Merely asking for bái cài in many a Chinese store or restaurant will be met with blank stares and requests to clarify. From here on I'm just going to translate 白菜 as 'cabbage'.

      So, here we go.


       
      Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis
       
      This is what you may be served if you just ask for baicai. Or maybe not. In much of China it is 大白菜 dà bái cài meaning 'big cabbage'. In English, usually known as Napa cabbage, Chinese cabbage, celery cabbage, Chinese leaf, etc.  In Chinese, alternative names include 结球白菜 / 結球白菜 ( jié qiú bái cài ), literally knotted ball cabbage, but there are many more. 
       
      This cabbage is also frequently pickled and becomes  known as 酸菜 (Mand: suān cài; Cant: syun1 coi3) meaning 'sour vegetable', although this term is also used to refer to pickled mustard greens.
       

      Pickled cabbage.
       
      In 2016, a purple variety of napa cabbage was bred in Korea and that has been introduced to China as 紫罗兰白菜 (zǐ luó lán bái cài) - literally 'violet cabbage'.
       

      Purple Napa (Boy Choy)
       
    • By liuzhou
      Yesterday, an old friend sent me a picture of her family dinner, which she prepared. She was never much of a cook, so I was a bit surprised. It's the first I've seen her cook in 25 years. Here is the spread.
       

       
      I immediately zoomed in on one dish - the okra.
       

       
      For the first 20-odd years I lived in China, I never saw okra - no one knew what it was. I managed to find its Chinese name ( 秋葵 - qiū kuí) in a scientific dictionary, but that didn't help. I just got the same blank looks.
       
      Then about 3 years ago, it started to creep into a few supermarkets. At first, they stocked the biggest pods they could find - stringy and inedible - but they worked it out eventually. Now okra is everywhere.

      I cook okra often, but have never seen it served in China before (had it down the road in Vietnam, though) and there are zero recipes in any of my Chinese language cookbooks. So, I did the sensible thing and asked my friend how she prepared it. Here is her method.
       
      1. First bring a pan of water to the boil. Add the washed okra and boil for two minutes. Drain.

      2. Top and tail the pods. Her technique for that is interesting.
       

      3. Finely mince garlic, ginger, red chilli and green onion in equal quantities. Heat oil and pour over the prepared garlic mix. Add a little soy sauce.
       

      4. Place garlic mix over the okra and serve.
       
       
      When I heard step one, I thought she was merely blanching the vegetable, but she assures me that is all the cooking it gets or needs, but she did say she doesn't like it too soft.

      Also, I should have mentioned that she is from Hunan province so the red chilli is inevitable.
       
      Anyway, I plan to make this tomorrow. I'm not convinced, but we'll see.
       
      to be continued
       
       
    • By missdipsy
      Two of my family members are pescetarian, one of whom is my picky daughter who only likes a few types of fish cooked in very specific ways so to all intents and purposes is mostly vegetarian. Many Chinese soup recipes involve meat or fish, or at least meat broth, so I'd love to find a few more recipes that would suit my whole family (I also don't eat much pork as it doesn't always agree with me, and a lot of soups involve pork so this is also for my benefit!). Vegetarian would be best, or pescetarian soups that are not obviously seafood based (I could get away with sneaking a small amount of dried shrimp in, for instance, but not much more than that!).
       
      Any kind of soup will do, although I'd particularly like some simple recipes that could be served alongside a multi-dish meal. But I'm always interested in new recipes so any good soup recipes would be welcome!
       
      Any suggestions?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...