Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Luxury Ice Company


weinoo
 Share

Recommended Posts

These are good points to make. The only thing I'll say about the melting properties of spherical ice (or, rather, big ice in general) is that the liquid is usually already pre-chilled (and pre-diluted for that matter) before it is put into the glass with the big piece of ice. So the big piece of ice is not so much there to lower the temperature of the liquid as it is to maintain the temperature of the liquid.

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Minor quibble: Is not the melting point of ice in an alcohol solution substantially <0*C, motivating a discussion of entropy?

It seems to me that large ice dilutes less because unless the cocktail is agitated more than with small ice, it will be warmer and have melted less. If the cocktail were stirred to the same temperature as small ice, then it would be more dilute because the core would be colder (having not absorbed heat from the drink).

Therefore I think the best application is for drinks which either a) are already very cold before being put into the glass or b) where less dilution is preferable to a colder drink (scotch, perhaps).

As an aside, I think big ice cubes/spheres are likely to come from a very cold freezer, whereas regular small ice tends (in most bars) to be warmer (0C) and probably very wet (surface water dilution).

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are good points to make. The only thing I'll say about the melting properties of spherical ice (or, rather, big ice in general) is that the liquid is usually already pre-chilled (and pre-diluted for that matter) before it is put into the glass with the big piece of ice. So the big piece of ice is not so much there to lower the temperature of the liquid as it is to maintain the temperature of the liquid.

Is this true? I use big pieces of ice at home quite a bit (either the moma mold spheres or the tovolo big squares depending on mood), but mostly in drinks that are just spirit + ice + maybe a splash of water (basically just rocks drinks with a big rock).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Therefore I think the best application is for drinks which either a) are already very cold before being put into the glass or b) where less dilution is preferable to a colder drink (scotch, perhaps).

90% of my big ice use is scotch + ice; trying to figure out if I'm just being stupid (especially since a splash of water/soda isn't uncommon either).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In your case, you want the ice to melt a good bit anyway.

In bars nowadays, it's common practice when making an Old Fashioned-type drink to stir the cocktail on ice until it is chilled, then pour it into the glass over fresh ice.

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In your case, you want the ice to melt a good bit anyway.

In bars nowadays, it's common practice when making an Old Fashioned-type drink to stir the cocktail on ice until it is chilled, then pour it into the glass over fresh ice.

Right, thought about it more after I posted - I would put anything "brown and stirred" over those ice blocks too (just don't make them at home as much these days since 90% of the time I'm trying to avoid sugar)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave Arnold (of the Cooking Issues blog and the French Culinary Institute) has researched this matter extensively an made two seminars in the Tales of the Cocktail about it called "The Science of Shaking" and "The Science of Stirring". Worth reading, but the core message is: "There is no chilling without dilution. There is no dilution without chilling"

Cocktails: The Science of Shaking

Tales of The Cocktail: Science of Shaking II

Cocktail Science in General: Part 1 of 2

Cocktail Science in General: Part 2 of 2

Paulo Freitas

Bartender @ Bar do Copa (Copacabana Palace, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil)

http://www.bardocopa.com.br

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave Arnold (of the Cooking Issues blog and the French Culinary Institute) has researched this matter extensively an made two seminars in the Tales of the Cocktail about it called "The Science of Shaking" and "The Science of Stirring". Worth reading, but the core message is: "There is no chilling without dilution. There is no dilution without chilling"

Cocktails: The Science of Shaking

Tales of The Cocktail: Science of Shaking II

Cocktail Science in General: Part 1 of 2

Cocktail Science in General: Part 2 of 2

Well, there are the stone ice cubes :wink: They make dandy little paper weights, too. AND they're cheaper than the 'luxury ice'.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So just as a matter of curiosity what about "plastic" ice (was given to me as a gift by someone who thought they were helping...) or the cold rocks you see advertised (I don't have those!). There are times when I would like to chill something a little bit, but not a lot, but not keep the bottle in the fridge or freezer and also don't really want it diluted any further. A nice 80 proof rum perhaps that doesn't need any further dilution to bring out the flavors. You can chill the glass but that only lasts so long and these tend to be slower sipping drinks. Or something to be had out on the deck on a warmer evening where you want to keep it a little cool but not dilute it further.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, there are the stone ice cubes :wink: They make dandy little paper weights, too. AND they're cheaper than the 'luxury ice'.

So is that a resounding "No Thanks!" on the stone ice cubes?

They didn't really impress me either.

Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, there are the stone ice cubes :wink: They make dandy little paper weights, too. AND they're cheaper than the 'luxury ice'.

So is that a resounding "No Thanks!" on the stone ice cubes?

They didn't really impress me either.

Actually, for me, the entire ice-for-drinks topic is sort of academic, because I don't like my drinks that cold.

But I have to admit that I bought the rocks in a 'why not' moment during the latter part of an Icelandair flight, where they were sold as 'Icelandic lava stones'. I failed to interest my boyfriend in them, used them occasionally as paperweights, then conscientiously put them in the freezer, next to the paint rollers. They're STILL a better value than the Gläce Luxury Ice... what bewilders me more than the overpriced ice itself, however, is trying to even begin to imagine the mindset of someone who would buy it. I can't wrap my head around that, at all.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In bars nowadays, it's common practice when making an Old Fashioned-type drink to stir the cocktail on ice until it is chilled, then pour it into the glass over fresh ice.

In better bars, you mean.

Sadly, plenty of the craft cocktail places in Los Angeles do not follow this proceedure.

As a customer, I have many, many times stirred an OF or OF-type drink after it's been built in the glass, and then placed in front of me with little to no stirring.

Edited by campus five (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In your case, you want the ice to melt a good bit anyway.

In bars nowadays, it's common practice when making an Old Fashioned-type drink to stir the cocktail on ice until it is chilled, then pour it into the glass over fresh ice.

Well, that's it then. I'll use the $5 ice for stirring the cocktail AND serving. Can't be too careful, dontchaknow.

Add me to the list of people who think this is ridiculous -- especially considering that a $5 ice cube should look like a glass sphere, not a snowball.

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why is this different than a Rollex? Because watches don't melt?

It would be fun to do a full on scientific eval of melt rates, dilution, etc. Anyone have a lab? Where is Dave Arnold when you need him?

Edited by hathor (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, there are the stone ice cubes :wink: They make dandy little paper weights, too. AND they're cheaper than the 'luxury ice'.

So is that a resounding "No Thanks!" on the stone ice cubes?

They didn't really impress me either.

They're also terrible at chilling the drink.

So anyone have an opinion on these?

This is what I got as a gift this summer. Used them a couple of times and seemed OK. Didn't notice any plastic smell in the drink. I usually wash and then briefly boil them after use to try to insure they don't carry any aroma or anything else from drink to drink.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Isn't dilution factored into a cocktail? You want a certain amount of water, right?

Sometimes, yes. Although sometimes I prefer to control the amount of water I add and still keep the drink a little bit cool, especially on a warm day. So I add a specific amount of water for, say, a barrel proof bourbon, and then want to keep it cooler than the outside temp of 90+ degrees. Non melting "ice", such as it is, would seem the way to go.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...