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percyn

eG Food Blog: Percyn (2011)

123 posts in this topic

Another question from cold North America:

Fresh Sugarcane juice

Is that glass full of the juice that simply gets squeezed out of the cane?

Yes, it is fresh squeezed sugar cane juice and as Heidi points out, it is ground in a hand cranked or motorized press along with, in this case, ginger and lime to give it some depth of flavor.

I have other pics which I need to download and will post them extracting the juice.

Here is how they extract the juice from the sugar cane.

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Your vegetarian photos made me salivate, just looking at them. :wub: :wub:

I would love to try custard apple ice cream. Aha. Googled it and found it's like a cherimoya. We don't get them up in the far frozen north very often, but I do like them.

Custard apple does taste very similar to Cherimoya but IMHO custard apple has a slightly softer skin, texture and is sweeter.

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Everything looks so interesting and incredible. Oh my. :wub: :wub: :wub:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Loving the photos, percyn.

Is the jalebi dough similar to gulab jamun?

And happy Diwali! I went to a Diwali lunch this week at work and it was one of the most sensational feasts I've had in a long time. I'm STILL full, two days later.


Edited by rarerollingobject (log)

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Loving the photos, percyn.

Is the jalebi dough similar to gulab jamun?

And happy Diwali! I went to a Diwali lunch this week at work and it was one of the most sensational feasts I've had in a long time. I'm STILL full, two days later.

Kate, I believe Jalebi dough is different from Gulab Jamun, which contains milk solids.

The Jalebi is crispier (they ask you how crispy you like it when they fry the dough) and then it is quickly dunked in the sugar syrup. It is a common sweet found at Indian stores outside India as well. Try it if you see it. I recommend having it with a glass of warm milk.

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Happy Diwali percyn! Khandvi looks good, that is one of my fav things. And thanks for vada pav pics - I love those salted chillies you get with them.

Happy Diwali and Happy New Year to you!

Here are some fireworks we lit last night.

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For those who may not be familiar, Diwali is a major festival in India (kind of a combination of Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year) and is widely celebrated. Most schools and business are shut for a few days if not a week or more.

While not technically a Parsi holiday, in true form we never turn down an opportunity to celebrate, often with much gusto.

What? Today is Wed? There must be some reason to party :biggrin:

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On the 2hr trip from Pune to Panchgani, we stopped by a few places for breakfast and a small farm/restaurant (does not get much more farm to table when they are eat located 6ft apart) to pick up lunch.

The restaurant is located under a large Banyan tree which must be at least 200 years old, if not much more.

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The cooking is done over an open flame

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Milk source in the background

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Chickens, minus 1

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Edited by percyn (log)

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After driving up the winding mountain roads called Ghats, we reached the center of Panchgani, which was decked out getting ready for Diwali.

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Snacks of spiced channa and peanuts

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A form of transport which is stilled used to pack people into Jeeps to take them to nearby areas. Will see of we can hitch a ride one of these days.

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We finally arrive. The cooler breeze is refreshing, but the view is priceless.

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We sit for a late lunch of the Maharashtrian style chicken and spicy gravy we picked up from the farm restaurant.

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We also had green wheat chapatis with a super spicy chili chutney.

After lunch we rode the ATVs around the compound, enough to warrant a quick afternoon nap.

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Loving the photos, percyn.

Is the jalebi dough similar to gulab jamun?

And happy Diwali! I went to a Diwali lunch this week at work and it was one of the most sensational feasts I've had in a long time. I'm STILL full, two days later.

Gulab jamun is made from khoa (milk that is cooked down until it is solid) that has a little flour added and is then deep fried before being put in syrup. Nowadays an inferior version made with powdered milk is common, and if they want to make it at home many people choose this easier way. Not good if you ask me!

Jalebi are made from a batter of flour and yoghurt that is fermented a little before the jalebi are fried. They are then put in syrup. "Cheat" versions with yeast or baking powder also exist nowadays. Take percyn's advice and enjoy with a glass of hot milk - delicious!

We finally arrive. The cooler breeze is refreshing, but the view is priceless.

Looks gorgeous.

Chikki is essentially brittle, usually made with nuts and jaggery.

Just starting to see some new season jaggery here, and lots of chikki is also around. A friend and I demolished a bar over chai a few days ago...too good!

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Happy Diwali percyn! Khandvi looks good, that is one of my fav things. And thanks for vada pav pics - I love those salted chillies you get with them.

Happy Diwali and Happy New Year to you!

Here are some fireworks we lit last night.

IMG_1918-1200.jpg

IMG_1920-1200.jpg

For those who may not be familiar, Diwali is a major festival in India (kind of a combination of Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year) and is widely celebrated. Most schools and business are shut for a few days if not a week or more.

While not technically a Parsi holiday, in true form we never turn down an opportunity to celebrate, often with much gusto.

What? Today is Wed? There must be some reason to party :biggrin:

I remember first hearing about Diwali from an episode of The Office :biggrin:

The celebration that you had looks SO fun!!! I'm really enjoying being introduced to all of these new (to me) foods.

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Loving the blog - having serious flashbacks. I took my family there for a 2.5 year expedition and it's been over a year since we left, so we've been really missing India as of late!

Keep it up, great pictures!


PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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