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Roasting Nuts with Oil and Salt


John DePaula
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I used to use a product whose ingredients listed Almonds, Sunflower Oil and Sea Salt. Recently, the ingredients changed substituting Peanut Oil for the Sunflower Oil. I want to avoid using peanut oil because of allergen concerns.

I would like to replicate these roasted nuts at home, using sunflower or safflower oil.

The end product should not be oily at all.

So, would you just mist the nuts very lightly with oil and roast, stirring often, in a 325F oven (165C)?

Like I said, I do not want the nuts to be oily but I do want the salt to stick.

Thanks.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I'd try misting with oil then roasting, as well as roasting then misting to see which is closer to the product you like. I can't imagine there are too many other ways to do it. You might try a heavy pan instead of the oven, though.

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Generally when roasting nuts you lightly oil the pan, not the nuts - the heat and stirring are what give you enough oil to stick the salt. Almonds in and of themselves are quite oily and you do want a bit of that to come out; it's part of the distinctive flavour of roasted almonds.

Do you have a paila or other roasting pan? What type of vessel are you using for the roasting? I ask because in my experience nothing beats a metal pan for this kind of thing; much less oil is needed and it's easier to maintain an even temperature.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Generally when roasting nuts you lightly oil the pan, not the nuts - the heat and stirring are what give you enough oil to stick the salt. Almonds in and of themselves are quite oily and you do want a bit of that to come out; it's part of the distinctive flavour of roasted almonds.

Do you have a paila or other roasting pan? What type of vessel are you using for the roasting? I ask because in my experience nothing beats a metal pan for this kind of thing; much less oil is needed and it's easier to maintain an even temperature.

I generally use an aluminum quarter-sheet pan to roast nuts in the oven. Stirring often, I get a fairly uniform color.

Thanks for the info. I'll try misting the pan lightly to see if it's the effect I want.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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