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"Hawksmoor at Home"


ChrisTaylor
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Anyone picked up a copy yet? I've never been to the steakhouse--altho' flipping through the book, that's something I must correct when I head to the UK in '012--but this is a nice book. Obviously beef centric, altho' there are also recipes for other beasts--chicken, lamb, veal, goose, pork and shellfish. What's nice is that for a meat-centred book, the steak and burger recipes are less recipes and more detailed breakdowns of the technique. Indeed, the book as a whole has a lot of recipes (for cocktails as well as savoury dishes and puddings) but there's also a lot of room given to relevant techniques. Altho' being a steakhouse book there's obviously no discussion of sous vide, etc. A nice touch, too, that I'd never thought of before: the burger patties are made with ground meat and bone marrow. Genius. The breakfast section alone should mean that this book is sold in sealed black plastic and kept behind the counter and only sold after a waiver has been signed.

I love this kind of book and I love this kind of food. Already this is one of my favourite British cookbooks. Tonight I'm cooking a T-bone steak (using their method, which differs somewhat from my usual) and some of the sides. Preparing a marinade for the 'Tamworth pork ribs', too.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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I loved the Hawksmoor on a recent trip to London and am glad to see that they now have a cookbook. Thanks for the alert.

I wish they allowed for more insight as to what's in the index, chapters, etc, but perhaps you can help us know more of what is in the cookbook. By any chance are there recipes for bone marrow gravy and the stilton hollandaise? Beef dripping chips? Sticky toffee pudding? Recipes for any of those would make this book a must-buy for me.

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I loved the Hawksmoor on a recent trip to London and am glad to see that they now have a cookbook. Thanks for the alert.

I wish they allowed for more insight as to what's in the index, chapters, etc, but perhaps you can help us know more of what is in the cookbook.

Chapters and contents:

* Meat: their definition of quality meat, finding and identifying quality meat, the science of what happens when you age beef, cooking steaks, steak sauces, hamburgers and etc (a tartare, a hotdog), roast beef lore and recipes, braises/slow-cooked dishes, grilled chops of various species, a couple of roast poultry recipes.

* Seafood: some techniques (i.e. shucking and preparing oysters), some mostly shellfish-centred recipes

* Sides: potato and other vegetable recipes

* Cheese: some recommendations of cheeses to buy, some cheese-heavy recipes (i.e. macaroni and cheese, a salad)

* Breakfast and brunch: lore, recipes for meaty breakfasts (baked beans, their signature sausages, HkMuffin)

* Puddings: desserts such as queen of puddings, sundaes, trifle

* Cocktails: lore and a limited amount of technique, a few cocktails (mostly twists on classics--i.e. a tobacco Old Fashioned)

* Wine selection of wines appropriate to the style of food served at the restaurant/in the book, a limited amount of technique (decanting)

By any chance are there recipes for bone marrow gravy and the stilton hollandaise?

Yes and yes.

Beef dripping chips?

Yes.

Sticky toffee pudding?

Yes.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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