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A whole prosciutto


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I'd buy that in a heartbeat, then. But a grocery store here would be fined/cited/closed down for selling meat that far past it's sellby date.

EDIT - Most of these hams are aged for six months to two years. Just consider it "extra aged." Yup, I'd be cackling the whole way out the store like Snidley Whiplash if I found that.

You'd buy it when the sell by date was last December?

I'd buy it, and I'm generally a neurotic freak about things like sell-by dates and possible food poisoning. Properly cured prosciutto is, as ScoopKW pointed out, something that ages, and it does so very nicely. The sell-by date is a legal requirement, even in Italy, where you can buy it at any stage from very young to well-aged.

My only concern would be about the original quality... how the heck did they get so cheap?! But almost certainly worth a go.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I think so. I've been reading online to make sure I know what it would look like if it had gone bad, and as long as I avoid that I should be okay. But can it be frozen? There are only two of us here, and as much as many of you would like to help me eat it, Montana is a bit far off the path for most.

I have been planning to have a get-together with some friends anyway. If it doesn't kill me, it might be a good excuse.

Have to wait until tomorrow, as the store is closed today.

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I'm at the store now--there was one of the two left. It's Il Numero Uno brand, if that means anything. Follow up later.

That isn't actually a brand, but the trademark for an export consortium (http://trademark.markify.com/trademark-owner/uspto/consorzio+per+l%27esportazione+del+prosciutto+s.r.l./160305). Nothing about the producer on the label?

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Maybe it's one of those brands that just goes to deli counters or something. I figured the brand didn't matter as much as that it is from Italy and has the correct ingredients. It's boneless. I tried a bit when I got home--no spoilage as far as I can see, dark red meat, somewhat oily feeling, a little tangy. I'm no cured meat expert but it tasted good to me. Now I wish I'd picked up a second one when they were available--I think my daughter would have liked one.

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I've never even HEARD of a boneless Parma ham. Although I still would have bought one the first day I saw it, and returned for more the next day if the flavor was right.

Glad you got one, though. Just slice it as thin as you are capable -- it's impossible to slice this stuff TOO thin.

Try wrapping slices around roasted asparagus (wrap after cooking the spears), or enjoy paired with cantaloupe, or even make the most luxurious muffaletta ever. Too bad this store wasn't selling inexpensive Italian panini grills to go along with the ham.

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

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Maybe it's one of those brands that just goes to deli counters or something. I figured the brand didn't matter as much as that it is from Italy and has the correct ingredients. It's boneless. I tried a bit when I got home--no spoilage as far as I can see, dark red meat, somewhat oily feeling, a little tangy. I'm no cured meat expert but it tasted good to me. Now I wish I'd picked up a second one when they were available--I think my daughter would have liked one.

Cut a big chunk off for her. (And some more for good friends.) Once you've started eating the ham, the clock starts ticking. Not very fast, but it's ticking nonetheless.

If it were my ham, I would cut it into quarters and freeze two pieces, eat one, and give one piece away. Just make sure it's wrapped VERY well in the freezer. You don't want this to become freezer-burnt.

Edited by ScoopKW (log)

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

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Maybe it's one of those brands that just goes to deli counters or something. I figured the brand didn't matter as much as that it is from Italy and has the correct ingredients. It's boneless. I tried a bit when I got home--no spoilage as far as I can see, dark red meat, somewhat oily feeling, a little tangy. I'm no cured meat expert but it tasted good to me. Now I wish I'd picked up a second one when they were available--I think my daughter would have liked one.

Cut a big chunk off for her. (And some more for good friends.) Once you've started eating the ham, the clock starts ticking. Not very fast, but it's ticking nonetheless.

If it were my ham, I would cut it into quarters and freeze two pieces, eat one, and give one piece away. Just make sure it's wrapped VERY well in the freezer. You don't want this to become freezer-burnt.

FoodSaver or some other good vacuum sealer would be the way to go. Lamb, and other stuff I've frozen, has still been good after being in the freezer for a couple of years.

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I made panini for dinner with some of the meat, sliced as thinly as I could with an electric knife, some Havarti, onions and mustard. Really good. Just to compare, I bought a few slices of prosciutto from a deli (Dietz and Watson brand). The deli stuff was more thinly sliced, more sour, and saltier. The color was more of a pink. I actually preferred the taste of what I had. I cooked some up in the frying pan to see what that tasted like, and it reminded me of boar bacon, but was too salty for my liking.

It's a good idea to cut it up and freeze some and use the rest. My daughter lives almost a thousand miles away, so getting her some would be no easy feat. She is a restaurant cook, and her boyfriend is a butcher, so I know they would appreciate it.

pro3.png

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Those ideas all sound really good--any more suggestions?

Slice open a chicken breast, stuff in a load of basil pesto and some cheese. I generally use a mix of parmesan & mozzarella, but gruyere or ricotta also work well. Wrap the whole thing up with thin slices of proscuitto like tutankhamun and then roast for about 20-25 mins. Or cook sous vide and sear.

I'm also a fan of veal saltimbocca...

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I've never had veal saltimbocca; veal is hard to come by around here. The chicken dish sounds good. My challenge is to make foods that are healthy. I eat mostly veggies, fruit, and meat. The sandwich last night was very good but an exception to my regular diet. Fortunately, I can eat all the prosciutto I want. :-)

Regarding the photo, mine is the meat that looks like marbled beef.

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