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What's up with Noilly Prat?


Hassouni
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Why is it a) so hard to find, b) so expensive (compared to any other vermouth I can find) and c) only available, when available, in huge bottles? Any good alternatives that are easier to get a hold of? I can find Martini & Rossi everywhere (dry, sweet, and "blanco), as well as Gallo, and Ravita.

I've been wanting a martini forever....

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That sounds like a local distribution issue. Among the options available to you is to a) build a good relationship with a liquor store owner/manager/employee and see if they will special order stuff for you, or b) buy Dolin Dry like many if not most folks did after trying it for the first time. 750 ml of dry vermouth isn't as excessive as it sounds, especially when you start drinking lots of vermouth cassis, enjoying it on the rocks, and using it for cooking.

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I always keep dry vermouth in the pantry, I use it all the time for deglazing pans and making sauces for chicken and pork. Definitely more versatile than all the other booze I have in the pantry, try making a savory sauce with kaluha ! :laugh:

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Not sure what you are getting charged or why it is so expensive, but I get my liters of Noilly Prat for $11 (which is comparable to 750mL of Martini & Rossi for $8 assuming you drink it all in time). I definitely like NP over other dry vermouths for I find it more flavorful. The Dolin is delightful to drink straight but I find that it can get lost in certain recipes.

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No trouble finding it here in the Ohio area, both sizes are widely available in both grocery & wine/liquor stores, and well priced too if I might add. I second hunting down Dolin Vermouth de Chambéry, it's one of, if not the, finest vermouths in the world.

Edited by CincyCraig (log)

During lunch with the Arab leader Ibn Saud, when he heard that the king’s religion forbade smoking and alcohol, Winston Churchill said: "I must point out that my rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite the smoking of cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after, and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them." Ibn Saud relented and the lunch went on with both alcohol & cigars.

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Another vote for the Dolin here, if you can find it. The negligible differential in price is more than made up for by the quality and taste. Keep it in the fridge once opened, upside down if you can manage it in the door perhaps, and it'll keep very well. It probably won't be around long enough to be an issue though...

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Keep it in the fridge once opened, upside down if you can manage it in the door perhaps

:blink: Booby trap for spouse?

Should be the same surface area and air in the bottle. I don't understand.

A vac-u-vin is a minor inconvenience and seems to work very well at prolonging the life of perishable wines and such in the fridge.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Keep it in the fridge once opened, upside down if you can manage it in the door perhaps

:blink: Booby trap for spouse?

Should be the same surface area and air in the bottle. I don't understand.

A vac-u-vin is a minor inconvenience and seems to work very well at prolonging the life of perishable wines and such in the fridge.

I use the vac-u-vin for mine but upside down I would guess probably helps reduce air exchange around the cork or seal. Right side up the air in the bottle is perhaps still being circulated to some modest degree?

Just a guess.

Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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