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CaliPoutine

eG Foodblog: CaliPoutine (2011) - Surviving and Thriving in the Land o

130 posts in this topic

I have psoriatic arthritis and my dr. told me that beef was very inflamatory. I gave it up when I was first diagnosed( 24yrs ago) and I dont miss it at all

randi-

are you on any injectible meds for the psoriatic arthritis? johnnybird has the condition as well but his physician didn't say anything to him about beef. is it possible since i source locally raised organic it makes a difference?

can we see the ocean? how about fresh dates - fruits not people!?

I'm on an IV medication( Remicade). I'll be going to the hospital for my infusion on Wednesday. They serve me lunch while I'm getting the drugs. I'll post pics of that( the lunch, not the medication. LOL).

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Randi:

So happy to see you blogging again! We have a lot in common. I too, am not fasting today because of my acid reflux. If I don't eat anything I start to feel really ill. I think we get a pass and get into the Book anyway, if we atone properly. Happy New Year and Gut Yontif to you!

I'm also a supertaster, but I LOVE strongly flavored foods. The only thing I can't handle are bitter flavors, which seem off the charts to me. Unsweetened coffee or tea, hoppy beers, some amaros, Campari, etc. Even tonic water is too bitter for me. I can't spit enough times to get that nasty taste out of my mouth after I get the YUCK face if I accidentally ingest something bitter.

I would also like to see pics of the dogs. I love dachsies!! They're so sweet! Also the obligatory fridge shot...

Happy New Year to you too. I'll post pics of the dogs on Friday ( there will be either 7 or 9 of them, depending on if I'm watching my aunts friends 2 dogs). Feeding time is hilarious with that many dogs.

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Dinner tonight was at Thai BBQ in Cerritos( a neighboring town to Long Beach).

My aunt and uncle ordered 4 appetizers. Chicken satay, beef satay, fried tofu and calamari.

After the apps, we got pad thai, crispy duck and veggie fried rice. I brought home the leftover fried rice and chicken for Jules. Those are the only 2 dishes(from what was leftover) she would eat and she questioned me up and down if there was fish in the rice. She wont eat seafood. Did I mention she is a very picky eater?

All that food came to $66.17.

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Edited by CaliPoutine (log)

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Great to see you blogging again, Calipoutine - from an entirely different locale. :cool: We stayed in Valencia for a week in August and yup...it was hot! Do you go to Marie Callender's Pie and Pasta? There was one beside the hotel, and I found their custard pies and banana cream pies very good.

Coming to Tarzana next August. If you want specific Canadian stuff, let me know! We'll be driving so no problem with weight/luggage restrictions - unless you want a whole pig or some crazy reuqest like that! :rolleyes:


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Great to see you blogging again, Calipoutine - from an entirely different locale. :cool: We stayed in Valencia for a week in August and yup...it was hot! Do you go to Marie Callender's Pie and Pasta? There was one beside the hotel, and I found their custard pies and banana cream pies very good.

Coming to Tarzana next August. If you want specific Canadian stuff, let me know! We'll be driving so no problem with weight/luggage restrictions - unless you want a whole pig or some crazy reuqest like that! :rolleyes:

No pig, no worries. I dont eat that much pork :wink: I wish I would have known you were here, I could have given you some restaurant recommendations and had you over for a meal. Or you could have cooked for me, Santa Clarita is sorely lacking in Chinese food( a constant craving of mine). I usually satisfy my craving for that when I go to Long Beach. Last time was my first time trying Thai food with my aunt and uncle. We usually go to a Chinese restaurant in Garden Grove.

I've never eaten at that particular Marie Callender's, but I know exactly where it is. Did you notice the plethora of chain restarants here? It's not that there are not independent restaurants too, its just that for the most part, they suck.

I was sitting here thinking about what independent restaurants we frequent, and I can only think of one Mexican place.

I might take you up on your offer. I do miss that mustard and they dont ship to the US. I can have it shipped to your house before you come to Cali. Oh and there is an awesome Jewish bakery in Tarzana if you're into that. They make the BEST Rye bread.

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Todays iced coffee and the view from my balcony.

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We are currently discussing what we want to do for breakfast. I have a meet and greet at 1:30 for the Santa Clarita Valley Cooking and dining group on meetup.org. The group has been dormant for awhile and someone just took over the leadership. I need to bring an appetizer or something. I have some cookie dough and already baked 7 layer bars in the freezer so I might just put together a cookie platter.

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You mention mustard, are there any other Canadian food items (from restaurants or shops, either dishes or ingredients) that you miss now you are in the US? For instance, to look at your username, do you miss poutine?

On the other hand, what foods that are not found in Canada are you happy to be able to get again?

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Breakfast. I was craving pancakes, Julie wanted oatmeal. I bought this mix from Opensky.com. I had a 20.00 credit that I couldnt let go to waste. In addition to this mix, I got 2 bottles of syrup and a choc. chip cookie mix and a brownie mix. I dont bake from mixes, but the ingredients are all natural so I'll use the latter 2 for J's work.

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Today, its just regular rolled oats. The blueberries are for my pancakes. J is drinking non fat milk.

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Here is my wirehair dachshund, Harley enjoying the plate. You can see the Cairn, Bella in the background.


Edited by CaliPoutine (log)

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You mention mustard, are there any other Canadian food items (from restaurants or shops, either dishes or ingredients) that you miss now you are in the US? For instance, to look at your username, do you miss poutine?

On the other hand, what foods that are not found in Canada are you happy to be able to get again?

Hi Jenni,

I never ate poutine, it was just a nickname given to me by my ex. I miss this fantastic restaurant, The Only on King in London, ON. The food was so freaking good. There isnt anything else I can think of. I do miss a few things from Michigan, I was only 62 miles from the Michigan border and I went at least 1x a week.

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I miss you too Randi!

And that Cake looks amazing.

We are heading to Port Huron this weekend for some shopping.

I should package up some Mustard and send it to you for Xmas/your birthday. Any flavour in particular?

There are some new places in town that you would love. I miss having someone to go out with.

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Lovely flapjacks!

I no longer get down to the Valley very often but the last time I visited friends in Tarzana, they took me to Red Dragon Chinese restaurant in Woodland Hills, 22919 Ventura. I was very impressed with their food and with the prices as I have paid twice as much for less quality at some of the "upscale" Chinese restaurant.

I had the Tomato Beef and it was an eye-opener. Never had it before. I shared an order of Vegetable Chow Fun and assorted appetizers.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Todays iced coffee and the view from my balcony.

. . .

The view is enough to convince me that I would quickly switch to iced coffee. I get hot just looking at it.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Hi Randi,

Nice bowl & plate. Are they new or vintage & what make? Do you ever get over to Ojai which at least used to be a bit of pottery heaven?

The berry sauce looks good but I'm a maple syrup purist.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Hi Randi,

Nice bowl & plate. Are they new or vintage & what make? Do you ever get over to Ojai which at least used to be a bit of pottery heaven?

The berry sauce looks good but I'm a maple syrup purist.

I love maple syrup too. The bowl and plate are Fiestaware( new). I have a little collection of the new Fiesta. When we renovate our kitchen, we want to make one of our kitchen cabinets glass front to show it off. Never been to Ojai, its on my list :smile:

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We went to Cousin's for lunch. Its a local place that isnt a chain. They make a salad that Jules really likes. I wanted to eat somewhere else, but a relationship is all about compromise( cough, cough). We shared the salad and an order of fries.

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We brought our own drinks because this places serves Pepsi and we prefer coke products( diet for me, regular for J). The salad is served with a parmesean dressing. I dont know why they call it parmesean, because I couldnt taste that flavor at all. The lettuce was wet, so the dressing pooled in the bottom of the bowl. The fries were good though.


Edited by CaliPoutine (log)

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Breakfast.

I ran out and got us bagels. In my case, a bialy. I scoop out the inside and use light cream cheese. Julie doesnt like anything on her bagels, no cream cheese, no butter( except on my homemade bagels). She also likes her bagels warmed in the microwave. You have no idea how much that kills me to do.

I went to a local place, I usually go to Western Bagel( a chain), if I dont have time to make my own.

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Morning iced, I got my undergrad at CSULB.

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Here is my ice. I LOVE this ice cube tray. I bought it in Ontario and I have yet to find more here. Ive searched thrift stores high and low. It makes the best ice. The cubes are solid and they last for hours and hours. I use filtered water( Julie calls it my princess ice". We have an icemaker, but I much prefer this ice.

We are off to Santa Monica/WLA. See ya later.


Edited by CaliPoutine (log)

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Julie is a police officer with LAPD. We were in Vegas last week ( we came home last night)for a Legal Conference. We had a city car that we needed to bring back to the motor pool today. Motor Pool is in downtown LA. After we dropped off the car, Julie suggested we go to Philippe's for lunch. Philippe's is the home of the orignial french dip sandwich. Julie told me the restaurant has been around since 1927. I dont eat beef, so I had the turkey. Julie had the original french dip. You can order it single dip, double dip or wet. J got a double dip. We also got an order of potato salad, macaroni salad, a pickle and a slice of cake. The cake was just meh.

I took a bunch of pics, but I'm having problems uploading. Let me go see what I can do about that.

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Congratulations & good luck on your move & relationship! Phillippe's! My dad was the headcook there for 20+ years. The lamb sandwich is by far the best... baked apples are good too.

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My parents had ice cube trays like that. I don't think I kept them though, or I would send them to you.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I don't like those ice cube trays, either. The noise is like scratching on a chalkboard to me. The plastic trays that twist were better but didn't last long. I heart my ice maker.

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I like my ice maker but I also have several of the Tovolo Ice cube trays, both the JUMBO and the Perfect.

I use them for freezing juices, purees, herbs, concentrated soup stock and whatever else takes my fancy.

I have them in different colors because even with a double pass through the dishwasher they retain a faint hint of garlic if the stuff includes it.

The jumbo ones are really nice if you want to freeze a piece of fruit in an ice cube.

I used to line the plastic ones with plastic wrap but don't bother with the silicone just because they do come in different colors so are easy to identify.

You can buy the lever-action ice cube trays made of SS from several online vendors.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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EatNopales, now that's a recommendation!

Awesome cake, Randi!


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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I like my ice maker but I also have several of the Tovolo Ice cube trays, both the JUMBO and the Perfect.

I use them for freezing juices, purees, herbs, concentrated soup stock and whatever else takes my fancy.

I have them in different colors because even with a double pass through the dishwasher they retain a faint hint of garlic if the stuff includes it.

The jumbo ones are really nice if you want to freeze a piece of fruit in an ice cube.

I used to line the plastic ones with plastic wrap but don't bother with the silicone just because they do come in different colors so are easy to identify.

You can buy the lever-action ice cube trays made of SS from several online vendors.

I got myself two of the Jumbo and two of the regular after reading about them on eG. I haven't used them for anything but ice - but I do love them!

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Oh I actually have some of those too but have never used them for ice :smile:


Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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