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Glass replacement for oven door


paulraphael
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Years ago I shattered the inner glass on the my oven door. I never fixed it because the oven works fine, and I know I'd probably just break the replacement glass the next time I make bread or dribble something.

But it probably effects the oven's efficiency. I'm considering replacing the glass with a piece of sheet metal. Something fashioned from an aluminum full sheet pan would probably be easiest.

Would aluminum survive the oven's self clean cycle, or would it warp terribly? What about stainless steel?

Notes from the underbelly

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i dont know about those metals. Id personally go with a 'factory' approved glass to be safer.

that being said i thought about your problem when I started baking. i used to like the oven with 8 - 10 patio rectangular 'bricks' about 1 x 6 x 8

after a few eps of this I got a 1 " thick piece of plywood and put it on the open door when loading and unloading.

ended up being worth it many many times.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Have you thought about just swapping out the door itself.

When I first moved up here I had a built-in oven and the glass door was broken - I think it was an O'Keefe & Merrit.

A local used appliance store had the same model, which I bought for less than $50.00, took the door off it and put it on mine, then junked the other.

It worked fine until I remodeled the kitchen some six years later.

I know other folks have done this - used appliances are usually cheap and it was far less than ordering a new replacement door would have been. However my reason was getting the oven fixed immediately instead of waiting a couple of weeks.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I seems to me that you cannot see thru metal.

Go to a glass store and ask them to cut you a piece of wire glass of the right size.

You can get glass with a "chicken wire mesh" inside the glass.

If the glass shatters, you are still OK.

dcarch

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I don't care about seeing through the metal. What's to see? Professional ovens almost never have windows. I just want something that doesn't need to be babied.

Stan, you don't think thin aluminum would warp? Self-clean happens around 900°F. Aluminum has a pretty high rate of thermal expansion and melts a bit over 1200F.

Notes from the underbelly

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I don't care about seeing through the metal. What's to see? Professional ovens almost never have windows. I just want something that doesn't need to be babied.

Stan, you don't think thin aluminum would warp? Self-clean happens around 900°F. Aluminum has a pretty high rate of thermal expansion and melts a bit over 1200F.

I think you would have more trouble with heat transference into the space between the inner and outer walls.

The glass is made to control transfer of the heat it absorbs into the surrounding metal - or so I have been told by an aerospace engineer who deals with windows on vehicles that go from hot to cold rapidly.

He says that the aluminum will RADIATE heat into the space between it and the outer glass and will probably blow the outer glass out. He just mumbled something about understanding convective heat transfer coefficients in a confined space before one tries to re-engineer an oven.

(I have a book club meeting shortly, he's a member.)

Think about replacing the door, it's safer.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Aluminum may tend to warp a little. I'd choose steel because it would not radiate as much heat to the outside and it's less expensive. Tempered glass is not a suitable substitute. I've blown one out like you and found a similar used oven for less than the factory replacement glass.

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