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AnythingButPlainChocolate

"Couture Chocolate" by William Curley

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I have had a copy for a few days now and there are a lot of recipes in that I want to try. So far I have just made the brownie. I would say it is not the best book for starting out, others such as Grewelling, Wybauw and Notter have far more detailed instructions on working with chocolate.

I bought the book because I have tried some Willaim Curley chocolates and thought they were very clever. The book gives recipes for flavours that are sold in the shop.

Flavours I want to try are things like apricot and wasabi, lemongrass and ginger, rosemary and olive oil.

There is a fair amount of patisserie in the book too, not just chocolates.

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hi

i am always on the lookout for new books on the topic of chocolate. a few weeks and i bought chocolate couture by william curley. the book contains a some quite interesting and inventive flavourcombinations that i have not come across before. the writer is very influenced by japanese flavours, and takes the asian influences beyond ginger and lemongrass. i made the orange/balsamic caramel and a macha/pistachioganache yesterday and was very impressed:)!


/Magnus - happy amateur chocolatier

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I just got given the book as a gift and have enjoyed flicking through it so far. Have not made anything yet.

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