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Shaking machine spotted in Queens


Fat Guy
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Am I the last person to get the memo on the invention of this incredible, amazing machine? I was in Queens today and went to buy some bubble tea at one of the Asian malls. I noticed that the tea was shaken by this clever machine and I thought, how come every bar doesn't have one of these? Am I crazy or is this potentially a useful item in the cocktail universe? Here's a short video I shot with my phone:

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I've seen those before. There's a couple of bubble tea places here in Philly that have them. They are cool looking. I often wondered if an old paint shaking machine could be reverse engineered for a bar. Now that these exist that wouldn't be necessary. In a cocktail context, the only thing I think it would be useful for is something really labor intensive like a Ramos Gin Fizz. Other than that, in the time it takes to load and unload the shaker and pour, I could have that drink in front of a customer already.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I thought about the efficiency of it but clearly these guys are using it to great effect. There is very little time at all involved in insertion and extraction from the machine. Meanwhile, they're working on the two next drinks while the machine is giving an extended shake to two other drinks. I can't see the math that says this isn't a time saver. But what I really wonder is how effectively the thing shakes compared to a human.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Right. But I think it only fits those plastic bubble tea cups. It would need to have a Boston Shaker with some kind of airtight seal on it for cocktails. I wonder about that sort of wheel like motion as opposed to a human shaking it having the liquid pass through the ice in the full length of the shaker. In theory, when shaking that's what you're trying to do. Not sure if this machine mimics that well enough or not. :shrug:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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It's hard to tell for sure from the video because it doesn't show the process from start to finish, but my memory is that the machine takes a cocktail shaker and after shaking they pour into a plastic cup. I think they happen to use a clear lucite shaker but I imagine a metal one would fit just as well.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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OK. That makes sense. But still doesn't answer the question about the rotating motion vs. full length of the shaker. I suppose a side by side taste test would be the only way to see if there was a measurable difference. I'm pretty sure the machine is going to beat a whole lot more air and ice chips into the drink. That may or may not be desirable.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Came across this Waring Cocktail Shaker a few weeks back. The reviews seem mixed.

Waring Pro Professional Electric Martini Maker on Amazon.com

eta: egullet discussion of it from 2007.

Edited by natasha1270 (log)
"The main thing to remember about Italian food is that when you put your groceries in the car, the quality of your dinner has already been decided." – Mario Batali
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Judging from the customer video of that machine in operation, we're talking about something with a different order of magnitude of shaking.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Speaking of ice chips in the drink. I actually had a customer ask me once where to purchase "the gadget that makes the little ice chips in the martini". :blink: Seriously. Thought there was some specialty device for it. So apparently there are folks that really want those little bitty bits of ice floating in their cocktail glass. Who knew? I'm guessing that the commercial grade shaker machine would probably do really well in that regard if using the usual sort of commercial ice, not the big solid Kold-Draft cartoon cubes.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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How is the result of the shake then? I'm sure they're very well shaken. (thinking if there are some machines that doesn't get the job done pretty well) I've seen a couple of that shaking machine in a bubble tea like store here in my area. I think they're really cool.

Edited by threestars (log)
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The process is too slow, is the main problem. Especially when you include the time you spend putting the shaker into the machine securely, turning the machine on, turning the machine off, and taking the shaker out of the machine.

Here's the thing: most cocktails don't need to be shaken for such a long time. In the video posted, the machine starts shaking at 0:12 and is still going at 0:31. Meanwhile, the guys working the back counter don't exactly look anxious to stop the shaking process as they go about their other tasks. That's just too much shaking time. The usual shaking time in most cocktail bars is going to be less than ten seconds. It's certainly not going to be 30 seconds or more, unless you're making a Ramos Fizz or something like that. And while it may be true that you can turn your attention to other tasks while the machine is doing the shaking, in a cocktail bar setting this is solved simply by preparing multiple shakers (I've seen as many as six at a time prepped at Pegu Club) and then shaking/straining them sequentially (or two at a time, if you have that skill).

I also have some issues with the speed, orientation and extent of the shake provided by the machine.

--

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If I had one of these machines I'd make a Ramos Fizz every day.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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If I had one of these machines I'd make a Ramos Fizz every day.

To a man with a hammer...

But, I do wonder what sort of new frothy treats might come from a creative mind given one of these machines for experimentation. I don't know many bartenders who love shaking their arms off to indeterminate ends. Having access to something like this might encourage more brainstorming in the family of emulsified (if that's the right term?) drinks, but I don't see it as a solution to any current issue behind the world's bars.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Okay, I do want to go deeper into this issue, but can we pause for a moment of reflection:

Isn't that machine really cool?

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Sometime not long ago, deep inside the Waring Corporation:

Marketeer: Hey, Martinis are in. Let's name this stupid unnecessary contraption -- the electric can opener of 2011 -- a "Martini Maker."

Engineer: Um, you know that Martinis aren't supposed to be shaken, right?

Marketeer: So?

Engineer (to self): This job makes me dead inside.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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No, THIS machine is really cool (and of similar practical value):

THAT is a glorified paint shaker. And a small one at that!

:wacko:

Wow. I'm uncharacteristically speechless over that one. There are no words for that...

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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No, THIS machine is really cool (and of similar practical value):

THAT is a glorified paint shaker. And a small one at that!

:wacko:

Wow. I'm uncharacteristically speechless over that one. There are no words for that...

There is only one word for that:

MOUSETRAP!!!

(You may need to be of a certain age to get the reference....)

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