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weinoo

Omelet - Pale and Blond, or Browned

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I'm having a bit of a discussion with a friend, who is trying to convince me that a good omelet is golden brown on the outside. Hogwash, I say. A great omelet is pale and blonde on the outside, just runny on the inside. Golden browned eggs tend to be tough and dry.

How do you like yours? Omelets, that is.

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While I recognize that a "technically correct" omelette is pale on the outside, I prefer a little bit of browning on mine. It's added flavour and added texture. They do tend to be tougher than pale eggs, but I can live with that.

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Jacque Pepin a long time ago , in the VCR days no less called the

Browned Omelette the Country Omelette and the pale sl runny one the Classic Omelette and showed you how to make each.

to each their own.

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Brown and flat if I'm topping/filling it with veg like ratatouille or sauteed peppers. Pale if I'm doing cheese, mushrooms, herbs, or plain. I don't like a brown omelet plain.

I happen to be eating a pale omelet as I write this. I considered a brown one, and decided against it-both are good though.

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I like them both ways, depending on my mood and what, if anything, is in them.

Jelly omelets definitely must be browned on the outside.

Mushroom omelets must be blond, as do truffle omelets.

Denver omelets need a bit of browning, not too much.

Cheese omelets should be dark blond but not browned.

If there is meat with the cheese, a bit more browning is better.

Omelets containing vegetables, such as asparagus or artichoke hearts benefit from moderate browning.

This is a very subjective process and certainly influenced by personal preference.

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What is a jelly omelet dare I ask?

I can't deal with the brown...the kind that doesn't cut through with a fork. I like mine the way Weinoo describes, in fact, I cook mine in a ceramic pan.....stays extremely blond that way.

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I wondered what a jelly omelet was too so I looked it up. It's an omelet with jelly or jam as the filling. I can really see this working with a jalapeno jam I bought and some queso fresco on top...I'm going to have to do that sometime soon.

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The spousal unit makes his omelettes a lovely golden brown on the outside, and tender as anything the rest of the way thru, so the initial Q made no sense at all to me.

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I wondered what a jelly omelet was too so I looked it up. It's an omelet with jelly or jam as the filling. I can really see this working with a jalapeno jam I bought and some queso fresco on top...I'm going to have to do that sometime soon.

I often make them with a burnt fig jam or my own smoky quince jam (quince jam cooked with Lapsang Souchong tea to get a lovely smoky flavor.

Several months ago I got some Skillet Bacon Jam and used one jar exclusively in omelets. Delicious!

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I wondered what a jelly omelet was too so I looked it up. It's an omelet with jelly or jam as the filling. I can really see this working with a jalapeno jam I bought and some queso fresco on top...I'm going to have to do that sometime soon.

I often make them with a burnt fig jam or my own smoky quince jam (quince jam cooked with Lapsang Souchong tea to get a lovely smoky flavor.

Several months ago I got some Skillet Bacon Jam and used one jar exclusively in omelets. Delicious!

That sounds fantastic. I'm definitely going to play with this. It sounded offputting at first, but once I thought of something other than grape jelly, the possibilities seem endlessly interesting. Thanks!

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No brown on mine, thank you, and no crispy edges on my over-easies.

Ditto.

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Ha. Not a speck of brown: isn't this the perfect test of a culinary student? Tender and moist, tastes like eggs.

I do adore a souffled omelet for dessert, preference is for homemade apricot jam inside. Blond.

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I would have to go for pale and blonde on the outside, and runny on the inside. Brown = tough. Have an omelette done the proper way, and you will never go back.

Hmm, right now I am hankering for an omelette ...

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Jacques Pépin on a country omelette and a classic French omelette...

 

[Alex French Guy Cooking] 

"I Try To Master Jacques Pepin's Perfect Omelet..."

HaHaHa!

 

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On 9/22/2011 at 12:25 PM, andiesenji said:

I like them both ways, depending on my mood and what, if anything, is in them.

Me too.

 

On 9/22/2011 at 12:25 PM, andiesenji said:

This is a very subjective process and certainly influenced by personal preference.

I agree.

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Never in my life have I wanted to eat or cook browned egg.

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I'm happiest with a French omelet. 

I avoid fried eggs because of the burnt rubbery parts. 

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Seems to me it is difficult to get even a bit of browning without toughening the eggs. I go for blond or golden, and only a little runny inside.

 

I wish I knew where my mother got her taste for jelly or jam omelets; it is hard to imagine my grandmother making such a thing, but who knows. She wasn't much of a cook though she did make mean gribenes! I must have liked those jelly omelets when I was a kid, but later they seemed rather strange. And the kind my mother made were filled with run-of-the-mill supermarket jelly or jam. I suspect I may have eaten  Welch's grape jelly omelet at some point. The great French American fusion breakfast! If someone put a gun to my head and made me chose between a jelly omelet and a nutella omelet I would go for the jelly. I know, no one asked.

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Posted (edited)

When fast fried, the browned area is very thin and crisp—it shouldn't be tough and the egg shouldn't be rubbery.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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