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Chili con Carne


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17 minutes ago, Susanwusan said:

Hi, I'd like a nice and fairly authentic chilli con carne recipe, preferably using minced beef, and what it could be served with.  I'm assuming rice and guacamole would normally go with it traditionally.


Here are links to two good, authentic recipes:

https://www.seriouseats.com/real-texas-chili-con-carne

 

https://leitesculinaria.com/101686/recipes-chili-con-carne.html

 

Both offer suggestions of what to serve with. Neither use minced beef. 

 

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Definitely no rice or potatoes, even though the LC recipe mentions them. Just some good bread (or cornbread or chips) on the side. Oh, and beer.

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3 hours ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

I don't think rice is usually served with chili

 

I think that is dependent on location. I've often had it served with rice.

 

Ground/ minced meat seldom. Chopped meat gives more of a bite rather than baby food.

Edited by liuzhou (log)

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I think you will find that “authentic” southwestern chili tends to be made with cubed beef in a chile sauce and no beans while other regions of the US might consider ground beef and kidney beans to be the norm… it is a WIDE playing field.  I have found “The Chili Cookbook” by Robb Walsh ( Here…) to be a good source for many variations. (My go to chorizo recipe is in there)  In AZ, you are likely going to be served flour tortillas and perhaps grated cheddar cheese as go-alongs. I love beans, so I usually add in pintos beans, or at least would have a bowl of them on the table.  Happy hunting!

 

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6 minutes ago, BetD said:

I have found “The Chili Cookbook” by Robb Walsh ( Here…) to be a good source for many variations. (My go to chorizo recipe is in there)

 

I agree and the second recipe I linked to above (on Leites Culinaria) is from that book.  

When it comes to go-withs, one could poll every chili lover on eGullet or anywhere else and come up with tons of options and little perfect concordance so I'd say the OP should go with what she or her audience likes and can get easily. 

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7 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I agree and the second recipe I linked to above (on Leites Culinaria) is from that book.  

When it comes to go-withs, one could poll every chili lover on eGullet or anywhere else and come up with tons of options and little perfect concordance so I'd say the OP should go with what she or her audience likes and can get easily. 

I also think that chilli is a recipe that if you gave each of us an “authentic” recipe, by our third repeat it would be hardly recognizable as the original. And each of us would have altered it in a different way.😂 I can’t think of a single ingredient that is common to all the chilli recipes that I have seen - – not even the chilli (chili). 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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I agree with the comments above that there are as many ways to make chili con carne as there are people. For my money, THE best version is from @JAZ's All-in-One Dutch Oven Cookbook for Two: One-Pot Meals You'll Both Love (eG-friendly Amazon.com link).

 

When I went to Amazon to look for this book and link, I used the "Look Inside" feature to look for the recipe. It isn't available. Perhaps if we ask nicely, Janet will share it here.

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A  point about the dish that I like to nise is that the setting of eating it is a huge part of the experience for me. Nothing I crave, but after a less than enjoyable day on the slopes (miscalc on run level) wow my best bowl was in the lodge cafeteria - everyone cradling styrofoam bowls of it. There were snow fliurries. Talk about "hit the spot".

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

A  point about the dish that I like to nise is that the setting of eating it is a huge part of the experience for me. Nothing I crave, but after a less than enjoyable day on the slopes (miscalc on run level) wow my best bowl was in the lodge cafeteria - everyone cradling styrofoam bowls of it. There were snow fliurries. Talk about "hit the spot".

 

Under these circumstances, I would think that saltine crackers would be a very necessary part of the experience!!

"There are no mistakes in bread baking, only more bread crumbs"

*Bernard Clayton, Jr.

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1 hour ago, BetD said:

 

Under these circumstances, I would think that saltine crackers would be a very necessary part of the experience!!

But I did not grow up with them so not my comfort list. I was shocked once when we took the boat captains to lunch after a successful fishing on their small craft and the one ordered ceviche with saltines - in Cancun. I've never understood that cracker but clearly - universal appeal. Also seen it in Mexico with seafood cocteles.

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On 12/11/2022 at 1:29 PM, Smithy said:

I agree with the comments above that there are as many ways to make chili con carne as there are people. For my money, THE best version is from @JAZ's All-in-One Dutch Oven Cookbook for Two: One-Pot Meals You'll Both Love (eG-friendly Amazon.com link).

 

When I went to Amazon to look for this book and link, I used the "Look Inside" feature to look for the recipe. It isn't available. Perhaps if we ask nicely, Janet will share it here.

 

I'd be happy to, if anyone is interested. 

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30 minutes ago, billyhill said:

Food and Wine has a Kennedy recipe for asado de chili colorado. It is a pork recipe but I will use it with chicken, beef, or just about anything else.

 

Google shows the way.

This one?

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Big hunks of beef, smaller chunks of beef, ground beef, beans, no beans, tomato, no tomato, a zillion variations on seasoning, I've even done a green chile version using ground pork and and black beans (made it up as I went, I was happy with it). I haven't met many bowls of chili I didn't like or at least, couldn't eat. And yes (avert your eyes, purists), I do indeed like Cincinnati chili too. :D

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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9 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

Cincinnati chili

I just couldn’t remember the name of that one! I knew it was served over spaghetti.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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3 hours ago, JAZ said:

I'd be happy to, if anyone is interested. 

 

Interested!  

 

I thought I did not like chili, because I grew up eating it over spaghetti.  The noodles were boiled, and then steamed in the top of a double-boiler for several more hours.  I do not think this treatment came from the Italian tradition.  Saltines alongside, always.

 

Have I ever mentioned, I ran away to college? 

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When my daughter asked for my chili recipe, I had to laugh and tell her that I have never made it the same way twice. I do always use stewing beef, as opposed to ground beef, and I usually use a mix of black beans, kidney beans and pinto beans. But if I don't have all three, I improvise. I used dried chilis, reconstitutted in broth, sometimes chipoltle chilis from a can. It's always a "wing it" thing. 

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I never write down what i add and it changes depending on what i have on hand, or what chile peppers look good at the grocery store, but I can name a few ingredients and techniques that have been a game changer for my chili.

#1 as crazy as it sounds, i dont brown my ground beef in a pot. I mix 1 TBSP of Goya Adobo AP w/pepper and 1 TBSP of chili powder to 2lbs ground beef. I take a baking sheet and a rolling pin and make a huge patty about 1/2 inch thick and bake for 15-20 min at 350F. After its done i remove it from the baking sheet and pat the excess grease off with a paper towel. After it cools i roughtly tear it apart with my hands to make nice size chunks. The benefit of this is you dont lose all that flavor of the seasoning as every bite has flavor, and also i prefer nice chunks of ground beef in my chili.

#2 I use chile puree as my base ( walmart sells it ) Its so much better then powder ( and very concentrated so use sparingly ) Its also less time consuming then making your own puree from dried chiles.

#3 Use Masa Harina ( corn flour ) to thicken. Benefit is it adds a subtle corn flavor and doesn't turn your chili white like AP flour, and its easyer to work with then cornstarch. I use more beef stock then needed bercause i like a more gravy like consistency to my chili.

 

Anyway, those are 3 game changers i figure i would pass on.

 

Edited by FeChef (log)
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