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nolnacs

eG Foodblog: nolnacs (2011) - Pork, peaches and pie. Saying goodbye to

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Ow. That was dumb.

If you put a pan in the oven and then put it on the stovetop, the handle does not magically cool down to a tolerable temperature.

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To help assuage the pain in my hand I bring you pictures of tasty pastries from the Terminal Market. I mostly bake my own breads and sweets but sometimes I get them from Metropolitan bakery. I particularly like their french berry rolls and their gateau basque.

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On the subject of tasty things, one of my favorite market snacks is a pretzel dog from Millers

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Mmmmm pretzel dog

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I think she is making some pretzel sticks here

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I don't typically shop at the Fair Food Farmstand during the summer since I go to the local farmers market, but it is a regular stop for me during the winter for raw milk and fruit. This stall at the Terminal Market sources all their products from local farmers.

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I don't have an image of it, but they also have a case of frozen meats.

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Also among the embarrassment of riches at the Reading Terminal Market is an entire stall devoted to honey and other bee products.

It is remarkable how honeys made from different flowers can taste so different. One of my personal favorites is orange blossom.

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I hope you guys aren't sick of pictures from the Terminal Market yet, because here is a selection of some of the tastiest things to eat there.

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Nutella crepe, need I say more?

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I didn't really like bread pudding until I had Beck's

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Apple dumpling - get the heavy cream, it's worth it

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Not my favorite roast pork purveyor but awfully close

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Okay, last post on the Terminal Market, Filbert promises.

You can always believe the promise of a pig

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I can't believe that I haven't mentioned Kauffmann's and their addictive peanut butter. I like the honey roasted but you can't go wrong with any of them.

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I can't stress enough that if you are in Philadelphia for any length of time, you need to go to the Reading Terminal Market. It is that awesome.


Edited by nolnacs (log)

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Looks like you took pictures at every vendor in RTM :laugh:. Good Job.

Agree about Xiaolongbao at Dim Sum Garden.

I love bread pudding and will have to pack a flask of bourbon and head down to becks :cool:

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Did you rub Philbert's nose and make a wish while you dropped money in his mouth?? Legend has it your wish will come true if you do that. I never leave RTM without paying homage to Philbert and helping support The Food Trust. One must curry favor with the pig regarding their wishes...

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So I have a lot of peaches, more than I expected even, what to do with them?

Compote!

This pot is not quite big enough.

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Stockpot works much better.

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Simmering into deliciousness

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My wife informed me that this compote will be used on pancakes. Good to know.

I'll be freezing most of it to use during the cold, peachless winter.

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One of the purchases I made yesterday at John Yi was a bag of salmon bits for Terry. I spread the bits out onto a sheet pan to freeze before putting them into a bag. That way I can easily get out one piece of Salmon for him.

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Hope your overheated hand is not a serious burn.

On the peach compote - are you going solely with the fruit or adding anything?

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Looks like you took pictures at every vendor in RTM :laugh:. Good Job.

Agree about Xiaolongbao at Dim Sum Garden.

I love bread pudding and will have to pack a flask of bourbon and head down to becks :cool:

My wife actually took most of the pictures while I was shopping which certainly helped with capturing a lot of the different stalls.

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Did you rub Philbert's nose and make a wish while you dropped money in his mouth?? Legend has it your wish will come true if you do that. I never leave RTM without paying homage to Philbert and helping support The Food Trust. One must curry favor with the pig regarding their wishes...

Not this week, but then my wishes have not come true before.... I wonder if the Food Trust is the origin of that legend.

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Hope your overheated hand is not a serious burn.

On the peach compote - are you going solely with the fruit or adding anything?

It's not too bad, just some small blisters. Rather painful though and I am reduced to typing lefthanded.

The compote is just peaches with a little bit of water to start it off. Hmm... is that still considered a compote?

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As I mentioned earlier, dinner tonight was roast pork sandwiches. I've already shown making the bread so here is the pork.

Smashing fennel seeds

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Rosemary and thyme harvested from my potted plants

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Butterflied pork shoulder spread with garlic, fennel, rosemary, thyme, parsley and red pepper flakes

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All rolled up. I only lost a bit of the filling out of the end

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More herbs all over the outside

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Pork coming out of the oven slightly browned.

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Added onions, stock, wine & pureed tomatoes as we move into the braising phase. This is when I burned my hand.

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Edited by nolnacs (log)

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So your peach compote has:

1) no added sugar?

2) or even a pinch of tartaric acid or a bit of lemon juice to retard spoilage?

Interesting. You said you'd be freezing a lot of this. Does it defrost well or does the texture suffer? Might it be better to do it canning style? Or puree it into a syrup texture and then can or bottle it in sterilized jars/bottles? Curious how this keeps. I never have enough room in my freezer to keep this sort of stuff in any quantities. My refrigerator is so crammed with bottles of homemade cocktail paraphernalia that I'd have to find a way to make it shelf stable or get a DBR - Dedicated Beverage Refrigerator - for stuff like this.

I can't believe they sold you that entire CRATE of peaches for $10!! That's just crazy. I had one of the white peaches I bought from the same vendor as a snack earlier. They're unbelievably perfectly ripe and delicious right now. I'll definitely be enjoying them for breakfast the rest of the week...

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Meat is done!

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Braising liquid

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Blending braising liquid into smooth sauce

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Pork ready to slice

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Sliced

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And back in the pot

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Finally, time to eat.

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It was pretty good but not quite up to the standards of John's or DiNics. For one I think I needed to slice the meat thinner and get more of the sauce into the sandwich.

For dessert we had some brown sugar peach ice cream. I kind of eyeballed this one and left it a bit short on sugar. It was still well worth eating.

peach ice cream 1.JPG

That's it's for me tonight. Hopefully my hand feels better tomorrow.

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So your peach compote has:

1) no added sugar?

2) or even a pinch of tartaric acid or a bit of lemon juice to retard spoilage?

Interesting. You said you'd be freezing a lot of this. Does it defrost well or does the texture suffer? Might it be better to do it canning style? Or puree it into a syrup texture and then can or bottle it in sterilized jars/bottles? Curious how this keeps. I never have enough room in my freezer to keep this sort of stuff in any quantities. My refrigerator is so crammed with bottles of homemade cocktail paraphernalia that I'd have to find a way to make it shelf stable or get a DBR - Dedicated Beverage Refrigerator - for stuff like this.

I can't believe they sold you that entire CRATE of peaches for $10!! That's just crazy. I had one of the white peaches I bought from the same vendor as a snack earlier. They're unbelievably perfectly ripe and delicious right now. I'll definitely be enjoying them for breakfast the rest of the week...

Oh, actually, yes there is some lemon juice in there. Adding it to peaches is so automatic for me that I didn't even think about it.

I have a chest freezer so it is actually easier for me to freeze things than to take up my very limited shelf space with canned goods.

Yeah, the peaches are a great deal and that is the normal price for seconds from them. You can order off their website and pick up at that market.

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Thanks for the info on the peaches. I might have to consider getting some less than perfect peaches from them for making peach syrup to get me through the winter. That's a bargain for all that fruit!

Hope your hand is better tomorrow. I keep a bottle of aloe vera gel with anesthetic in it (the kind for sunburn) in my refrigerator door. It's always at the ready if I burn myself in the kitchen and feels awesome going on cold if I do accidentally get a sunburn.

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Looks fabulous. Think I'd do broccoli rabe instead of spinach though.

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Ow. That was dumb.

If you put a pan in the oven and then put it on the stovetop, the handle does not magically cool down to a tolerable temperature.

I can't tell you how many times I've done that.

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I don't typically shop at the Fair Food Farmstand during the summer since I go to the local farmers market, but it is a regular stop for me during the winter for raw milk and fruit. This stall at the Terminal Market sources all their products from local farmers.

Reading Terminal Market 108.JPG

Reading Terminal Market 109.JPG

Reading Terminal Market 111.JPG

Reading Terminal Market 110.JPG

Reading Terminal Market 112.JPG

I don't have an image of it, but they also have a case of frozen meats.

Are those fresh figs up there by the cheese???? I've never ever seen a fresh fig. Before I die, I swear I am going to find, hold and eat a fresh fig.

I have a strange bucket list. :laugh:

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Ow. That was dumb.

If you put a pan in the oven and then put it on the stovetop, the handle does not magically cool down to a tolerable temperature.

I can't tell you how many times I've done that.

Sadly, this is not the first time I have done it either. You would think that I would have learned by now.

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