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tanstaafl2

Miodula "Presidential" Liqueur

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Anybody familiar with this spirit? I sometimes get a little obsessed with hard to find and/or unusual spirits to add to my "collection". I learned of this one from a show called "Three Sheets" that I confess was a bit of a guilty pleasure and that I watched because I occasionally get to do a bit of traveling myself and one of my hobbies is to explore local uncommon "adult beverages". But it did occasionally also uncover things that I decided I just had to have. One episode in Poland featured Miodula and it was not available as best I could tell in the US. But I was able to locate it at the extensive and intriguing Whiskey Exchange website and recently I was able to find a coworker passing through London and they agreed to pick up two bottles on my behalf . Sadly this was before I found out about Swedish Punsch or I would have had them get that for me as well. Next year I hope to be in London and visit their shop myself! I may never leave...

One of the bottles was pretty straight forward that it was from a specific vintage (2007, bottled in 2008) which is what I had expected. But the other bottle is noted to be a blend of several years and was marked with a tag indicating it was an "Exceptional Edition". Well, dang that's good news! But I can't seem to find out much more about it.

In any event it is quite nice. Obviously even without more info I have made a few inroads on this bottle!

Not quite sure how to make the pics smaller.

miodula 1.jpg

Miodula 2.jpg

Miodula 4.jpg

miodula 3.jpg

I checked the link on the tag but it didn't seem overly helpful.

Miodula

"Translated"

Anybody have any more insight about it or know where I might find more info? Preferrably in English!

As I write this it occurs to me I should write the Whiskey Exchange an email as perhaps they can give me more information about it.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Well, I am guessing there is not a lot of familiarity with this spirit, eh? Worth a shot I suppose.

Didn't hear anything back from the Whiskey Exchange either so two strikes at the moment!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Miód in Polish is honey, and miód pitny or "drinkable honey" is Polish mead, which is something of a national beverage with about the same percentage of alcohol as wine, but is isn't served as often as, say, vodka. It is served warm in small earthenware cups typically, often in "mead cellars" which might be found in restored medieval or renaissance buildings, and it's the kind of thing tourists might bring home as a souvenir.

I don't know if I've never had Miodula, but it looks to be a nalewka like krupnik, which is made from alcohol, honey, and herbs and spices or other flavorings, around 80-100 proof. There are also fruit flavored nalewki. It's the sort of thing that might be served to guests after a festive Polish meal. At an elegant reception, say, at the Polish consulate here in New York, they might bring out krupnik and other nalewki at the end of the night.


Edited by David A. Goldfarb (log)

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Miód in Polish is honey, and miód pitny or "drinkable honey" is Polish mead, which is something of a national beverage with about the same percentage of alcohol as wine, but is isn't served as often as, say, vodka. It is served warm in small earthenware cups typically, often in "mead cellars" which might be found in restored medieval or renaissance buildings, and it's the kind of thing tourists might bring home as a souvenir.

I don't know if I've never had Miodula, but it looks to be a nalewka like krupnik, which is made from alcohol, honey, and herbs and spices or other flavorings, around 80-100 proof. There are also fruit flavored nalewki. It's the sort of thing that might be served to guests after a festive Polish meal. At an elegant reception, say, at the Polish consulate here in New York, they might bring out krupnik and other nalewki at the end of the night.

Thanks! Sound about right as this is 80 proof and I think intended for formal occasions or at least promoted that way from what little I can find about. Just was surprised there wasn't more info about it. Or at least info that I could find fairly easily.

In any case I think it is quite good and that is what counts the most!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Different brand but here is my write-up on mixing with Polish mead.

ETA: I see my SanRu hack had raspberry syrup and I can't remember if I used it in the mead variation. Clearly more research is needed, if I ever get some more mead.


Edited by haresfur (log)

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I'm guessing Miodula wouldn't serve as a good substitute for mead. Definitely more of a liqueur or nalewka as David described. Looks like it is more intended to be sipped on its own although I am sure it could be used in a cocktail.

Not sure what I would consider building with it as I am not much for creating my own drinks. Prefer to see what the experts have come up with and then modify to my own tastes as needed!

For now I plan to continue to use it as an occasional after dinner treat. It makes a lovely and somewhat novel one!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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