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SobaAddict70

eG Foodblog: SobaAddict70 - Of Hobbits and Hurricanes

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We must be on the same wavelength! I'm making crepes with caramelized apricots for dessert tonight. Great minds and all that :laugh:...

I do want to make savory crêpes later this week.

I'll include a demo so Shelby (and others) can cook them with confidence. :raz:

I'm excited! In fact, I'll even put some fresh fruit on my grocery list so that I can make them after I learn from you!

Fruit around here is sad sad sad. It's so hot that none locally produced....so, I think bananas are my best bet from the store.

I DO have watermelon coming out of my ears from my (sad) garden....but, don't think that would go with crepes :raz:

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Your eggplant dish looks divine.

I also have a bunch of eggplant that produced well from my garden. They are the regular size with the "thicker" skin. I'm always in search of new recipes to use with them.

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Just to give you an idea ... I normally go through 3 to 4 bunches of parsley a week, and about half that of mint. So imagine what you could do if you grew your own.

It has been discussed and debated before, but can you share your fresh herb storage method of choice for the delicate ones like mint, basil, and parsley (versus the oilier and sturdier ones like thyme or rosemary).

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Just to give you an idea ... I normally go through 3 to 4 bunches of parsley a week, and about half that of mint. So imagine what you could do if you grew your own.

It has been discussed and debated before, but can you share your fresh herb storage method of choice for the delicate ones like mint, basil, and parsley (versus the oilier and sturdier ones like thyme or rosemary).

Mint and basil thrive well in a glass or bowl of water. I usually go through a bunch in 1-2 days though.

rosemary and thyme I usually leave out in a bowl atop the fridge

parsley -- *hangs head in shame* -- doesn't last long enough for me to store, but when I don't use it, it's in a plastic bag in the fridge.

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I had eggplant for dinner.

I don't use flour, I just slice it in large slabs, treat it with salt for 20-30 minutes, then rinse it well, pat dry.

I grill it in my Griddler, the grill plates brushed lightly with olive oil (doesn't have to be EVOO) till done, then sprinkle sparingly with grated cheese.

I finish it with chopped tomato and that's it.

I'm trying to lose a few pounds that sneaked up on me during the past few months so am using less of the sauces I like so well.

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Prepping dinner -- will be vegetarian.

May I ask, how many days a week do you make it veggie? Is this the easiest time of the year?

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Prepping dinner -- will be vegetarian.

May I ask, how many days a week do you make it veggie? Is this the easiest time of the year?

It varies depending on (a) how I feel, (b) what's available at the market and (c ) time of year. Also if I've had a meat-heavy or meat-light day ... it matters what I eat beforehand.

Usually I'm 50/50 but there are weeks when it's more like 5 days out of 7 that it's vegetarian. Once in a very great while, I'll be completely vegan. I don't do that often because I find that if I go vegan, I'm ravenously hungry afterwards.

Late dinner tonight -- prepping soon in a little bit.

Summer (late May/early June) through early December is the easiest time for me to go completely or nearly vegetarian.


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

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BTW, you'll almost never find me cooking with soy (i.e., tempeh, tofu and seitan).

I don't find dishes using those ingredients to be terribly interesting, outside of an Asian context. I'm also not a hardcore vegetarian. But most of all, it's because I want to write about and cook meals that people will find delicious and that also fit my focus on "seasonal and local". I just think that when you start talking about soy burgers, tofu skin mimicking roast duck skin, and deep-fried tempeh, it's difficult to make a square peg fit into a round hole.

Though I do love hiyayakko and agedashi-dofu. I just don't cook those very often.

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"Sopa de Ajo"

It's a variation of sopa de ajo, this time with mussels from Long Island Sound, Italian broccoli, cauliflower and rice.

Basically proceed with your usual recipe for sopa de ajo, then add mussels that have been steamed in white wine and thyme, thinly sliced broccoli and cauliflower, and the mussel cooking liquid. Serve with a poached egg and cooked rice.

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Enjoy you take on soy :cool:

It's not my take on anything.

It has to do with my wanting to talk about a style of cooking that I'm interested in, and I don't feel that soy makes that connection.

Vegetarian or vegetable-focused cooking need not be in the style of the Moosewood cookbooks to be delicious and interesting.

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I was vegetarian for quite a number of years and never felt the urge to use processed soy products to mimic meat. Don't get me wrong, I like soy products but am of the opinion that if you feel such a need to have something meat-like in your diet, why not eat the real thing?

As SobaAddict is showing us, you can showcase fantastic vegetable combinations without feeling obliged to fill a psychological void left by not having meat in the dish.

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It's going to be interesting to see how the torrential rains affect the crops and their availability at the greenmarket from this point forward.

I would imagine there are lots of flooded fields in upstate NY, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and New Jersey - some of the main sources of vegetables and fruits. It might be a lean year too for the autumn and winter squashes, grapes, etc.

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It's going to be interesting to see how the torrential rains affect the crops and their availability at the greenmarket from this point forward.

I would imagine there are lots of flooded fields in upstate NY, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and New Jersey - some of the main sources of vegetables and fruits. It might be a lean year too for the autumn and winter squashes, grapes, etc.

Definitely there was a severe impact. Probably won't know the extent of the damage for a few weeks though.

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Good morning.

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One of my favorite ways to eat breakfast:

Eggs, sunnyside-up on top of crispy buttered toast, with an heirloom tomato-cucumber salad (heirloom tomatoes, lemon cucumber, shallot, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic chives)

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Your soup looks inviting despite the heat here. I under use mussels and find soup to be a most satisfying meal so I will give this combo a try.

I am impressed by the care you take with components like the salad with your egg on toast. I would just slice up some tomato rather than taking the time for additional flavors as you have done with the little salad. Inspiring.

As someone generally cooking for yourself, how do you deal with a perishable like bread in terms of storage? Freezer, make croutons when it stales???

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Your soup looks inviting despite the heat here. I under use mussels and find soup to be a most satisfying meal so I will give this combo a try.

I am impressed by the care you take with components like the salad with your egg on toast. I would just slice up some tomato rather than taking the time for additional flavors as you have done with the little salad. Inspiring.

As someone generally cooking for yourself, how do you deal with a perishable like bread in terms of storage? Freezer, make croutons when it stales???

I use it up as soon as I can.

That's not a very helpful answer, so maybe this will clue you in ...

Leftover bread will be used in the next few days for panzanella and for flavored toasted breadcrumbs.

Lunch will be leftovers. ;)

Dinner will feature the rest of the mussels, plus my usual method of cooking zucchini (guaranteed to convert zucchini haters).

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Dinner will feature the rest of the mussels, plus my usual method of cooking zucchini (guaranteed to convert zucchini haters).

Very excited about this since I am a zucchini hater...

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Going to be a late dinner tonight.

Thin spaghetti with mussels, Italian broccoli and toasted breadcrumbs

Zucchini with rocambole garlic, parsley and mint

See y'all in a few hours.

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Kitchen shot

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Even with a board covering the sink, that's not nearly enough counter space for me. I don't think I've EVER been in an apartment in NYC where there was sufficient counter space. What's up with that?

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Mise en place for tonight's dinner

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Left: Zucchini with rocambole garlic, parsley and mint

Right: Thin spaghetti with mussels, Italian broccoli and toasted breadcrumbs

For the zucchini:

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 cloves rocambole garlic, peeled and chopped

1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley

3 medium zucchini

salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1 teaspoon fresh mint, chopped

Wash the zucchini thoroughly under cold running water. Cut the zucchini in half lengthwise and in wedges about 1/4 inch thick and about 1 1/2 inches long.

Put the olive oil, garlic and parsley in a sauté pan large enough to hold all the zucchini over medium high heat. As soon as the garlic begins to sizzle, add the zucchini and cook, stirring occasionally, until the zucchini are tender, about 8-10 minutes. It is best not to stir too often to allow the zucchini to brown lightly.

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While the zucchini are cooking, coarsely chop the mint. When the vegetables are tender, taste for salt and pepper, then stir in the mint. Stir for about 30 seconds then remove from the heat and serve at once.

Time: 30 minutes, including prep.

For the spaghetti:

3/4 lb. mussels

1/4 cup white wine

2 cloves rocambole garlic, peeled and chopped

2 small heads Italian broccoli, broken into small florets*

1 oil-packed anchovy fillet

olive oil

salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

breadcrumbs

a generous handful of Italian flat-leaf parsley, chopped

cooked spaghetti

toasted breadcrumbs**

* I like to chop the florets finely sometimes, and shave the stems with a vegetable peeler.

** Toasted breadcrumbs are 1/4 cup fresh breadcrumbs, salt, freshly ground black pepper and parsley, fried in 1 teaspoon olive oil until the breadcrumbs are golden brown. Use in place of cheese.

Place the mussels in a small pot, along with the white wine. Cover and steam over medium-high heat for 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from heat, discard any mussels that don't open. Remove mussel meat from the shells. Reserve mussel cooking liquid.

Gently warm olive oil in a skillet over medium heat, add garlic. Cook until garlic turns pale gold, add anchovy and let it disintegrate in the sauce. Add broccoli to the pan, along with a pinch of salt. Cook until broccoli becomes tender, about 6 to 8 minutes. If sauce seems too dry, add the mussel cooking liquid. When broccoli is tender, add the mussels to the pan; cook until heated through.

Add cooked pasta directly to the pan, and toss. Taste for salt and pepper, then remove from heat and serve at once. Top each serving with toasted breadcrumbs and Italian flat-leaf parsley.

Time: 45 minutes, including prep.


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

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I also like the parsley and mint combo with zucchini. Getting them a bit brown does bring out sweetness and concentrates the sometimes watery nature of their delicate taste.

I have seen and heard about the toasted breadcrumb in lieu of cheese and have yet to try it.

On the miniscule kitchen - it reminds me of some of the kitchens I have seen on food shows shot in Hong Kong. An amazing array of dishes coming out of a closet it seems. You do it well.

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Thanks heidih.

Okay, I didn't go to bed until around 6 am (remember, I did say I was on vacation so mealtimes and posts are going to be irregular).

This is probably one of the best and simplest breakfasts you can imagine. It's possible only with ripe and in-season heirloom tomatoes:

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Heirloom toamtoes, with ricotta cheese, green garlic pesto and extra-virgin olive oil

I've been using a lot of ricotta in my cooking lately, mostly because I think it's such a sexy ingredient that usually doesn't get as much love as it deserves to.

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I'll be heading to my Farmer's Market later for some heirloom tomatoes so I can try out your salad with ricotta cheese. Looks easy and delicious and I can't find enough ways to eat the embarrassment of riches of tomatoes that I can find lately. Thanks for this!

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I love ricotta, that version of tomato salad is pretty similar to a lunch salad we served a while back at my last job, except we used regular basil pesto. It's amazingly delicious, and I blame you for giving me severe ricotta cravings right now.

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