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Installing commercial vs. residential dishwasher


howsmatt
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Is the installation of a commercial vs. home dishwasher basically the same? I will likely have it done for me but want to know what to expect so that I can follow along and make sure there are no surprise fees/wires etc.

Thanks

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Probably not. I'm familiar with Hobart's undercounter model. While the form factor is similar to a consumer model, the Hobart gets detergent and rinse aid pumped from rather large containers that can be hidden from view (my setup has them on a shelf in a utility space below the kitchen). Also, you need a lot more power if the unit does thermal sterilization than a consumer model, and a lot of steam will exit when you open the door. That said, getting a load done in 90 seconds makes it all worthwhile. If you get one, be sure there's a commercial service company that makes residential calls, too.

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While I have never personally installed a commercial dishwasher, I can't imagine the two would be the same. There are so many more parts in a commercial dishwasher, different chemicals, pumps, boosters, disposals, etc. Not to mention that you have to have proper disposal of the waste water as well.

Just make sure to talk thoroughly with the installer and make sure he explains to you in plain english what he is doing and why. It's good for not only keeping an eye on him, but for future reference so if (when) the dishwasher breaks down you have some working knowledge of what the system is made of.

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I had a Hobart undercounter commercial dishwasher for 14 years and had very few problems.

I did have to have a bigger water line, I think a 3/4 inch. There were the chemical containers that were in the cabinet under the sink to allow access. When it was installed in 1994, I had a water heater just for the dishwasher and kitchen sinks installed. In 2003 I switched to tankless water heaters.

And it required 220 electrical supply - at one time there had been an electric range in the old kitchen so the contractor used that line and did what was necessary to comply with the local codes and the specific rules of the health dept. to get a commercial certification for my kitchen for catering.

It also had a waste line direct to the sewer line with its own air vent and a clean out plug outside the kitchen so there was no possibility of back up into the sinks.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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There are two types of commerical d/washers:

low-temp, which sanitizes via sanitizer

Hi-temp, which sanitizes via hot water.

A very basic hi-temp under counter model will set you back around 3-4 grand

If using hi-temp you will need a "booster hater" which boosts your residential hot water to the 80 C requred to sanitize. There are many configurations for this booster ehater, from 110 - 220 3 ph, and even higher voltages. Lower voltages will suck up more amperage though.

As with residential d/washers, the commerical ones have a tank as well, and this requires hot water to fill up in order to operate--good for multiple loads, very impractical for one-time loads.

Both types--or rather all types of commerical d/washers, operate with the 19" x 19" square washing racks. Some have "teeth" in which to slot plates in, some have pockets especially for glassware, and some are plain flat, for cutlery and large objects.

You need to design a pre-rinse area that can accomodate these racks while you fill them, you need to design an after-wash table for them when they exit the d/washer, and you need to allow for storage space for the racks when not in use.

For residential use, I think you're getting alot more trouble than bargaining for, with commercial d/washers.

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