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Franci

"Rose's Heavenly Cakes"

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Hello. I would be grateful if anybody could advise on buying a book.

It is a present for an Italian friend. He is not a novice baker but I wouldn't call him experienced .

I'm pondering buying Rose's Heavenly Cakes for him, I don't own it myself (I'm not into cake baking), but I think she is very detailed and it could be a very good resource for him to learn. I'm just worried the flavors in the book are too far from the European taste. But I don't own the book. Any thought?

I was thinking as an alternative Baking: From My Home to Yours by D. Greenspan or Ready for Dessert: My Best Recipes by D. Lebovitz

Thanks

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A bit older but still full of good help is The Cake Bible.


"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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... It is a present for an Italian friend. He is not a novice baker but I wouldn't call him experienced .

I'm pondering buying Rose's Heavenly Cakes for him, I don't own it myself (I'm not into cake baking), but I think she is very detailed and it could be a very good resource for him to learn. I'm just worried the flavors in the book are too far from the European taste. But I don't own the book. Any thought?

...

Hmmm ...

I find it a bit intimidating actually.

Also somehow, I felt it was written as "Volume 2" and I wondered what I might have missed by not seeing Volume 1. I felt late to the class!

Learning resource? Its format is closer to pure "recipe collection" rather than "technique tutorial followed by usage examples".

But, yes, the recipes are immensely detailed.

The specification of US-specific ingredients (Wondra, etc) was recognised, and alternatives suggested. The UK edition even gives metric weights.

It would be an impressive-looking gift.

But, in a 'French Laundry' sort of way, the illustrated perfection, and the number (and detailed prescription) of the instructions combine to give an "on a pedestal" impression. I suppose its about baking cakes to be displayed ... on a pedestal.

A half-way house between this and Nigella's utterly approachable cake book (tongue in cheek title: "How to be a Domestic Goddess") is Eric Lanlard's "Home Bake" http://www.amazon.co.uk/Home-Bake-Eric-Lanlard/dp/1845335716/ which I have found both instructive and approachable. He worked for the Roux brothers for 5 years before becoming an independent celebrity patissier; he knows his stuff. BUT its nothing like as impressive as a gift!


"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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Get Baking From My Home to Yours. Much wider variety of items, all of which are easy to make and DELICIOUS! Plus her writing style is incredibly approachable. I'm about halfway through baking all the recipes in the book and I haven't had a miss yet.

Seriously, best baking book I have! And I have lots...


If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Hello. I would be grateful if anybody could advise on buying a book.

It is a present for an Italian friend. He is not a novice baker but I wouldn't call him experienced .

I'm pondering buying Rose's Heavenly Cakes for him, I don't own it myself (I'm not into cake baking), but I think she is very detailed and it could be a very good resource for him to learn. I'm just worried the flavors in the book are too far from the European taste. But I don't own the book. Any thought?

I was thinking as an alternative Baking: From My Home to Yours by D. Greenspan or Ready for Dessert: My Best Recipes by D. Lebovitz

Thanks

Franci, I am an avid fan of Rose's Heavenly Cakes. I first began using that book as a brand new baker. The overwhelming raves I receive has spoiled me for most other books. I know it *might* seem a bit confusing at first glance but after you make a recipe or two you will notice a pattern emerge. It is my belief that Rose's technique is actually easy and the results are incredible. Really.

Here is the Amazon link to her book. If you scroll down the page you will see Rose gives links to 3 of her recipes. I think you won't regret trying them.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0471781738/ref=nosim/?tag=egulletsociety-20

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Someone just gave me this book and I immediately made the Whipped Cream Cake. The first time I've made an RLB cake. I've done her cookies and her pies.

Worst baking experience ever. I made it for a party and I was ashamed of it, had to cut it into small pieces, make ice cream the centerpiece, and apologize.

I imagined that the cake would be light like an angel food cake. It was heavy like a pound cake and did not release from the pan as described (it fell apart) and was so dry I could barely swallow it.

This has never happened to me before with any recipe.

I'm in the mood to chuck that and the Bible . . . siding with the folks who say her recipes don't work.

I don't think I've ever seen such firm camps on a cookbook author before -- it's interesting.


I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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Someone just gave me this book and I immediately made the Whipped Cream Cake. The first time I've made an RLB cake. I've done her cookies and her pies.

Worst baking experience ever. I made it for a party and I was ashamed of it, had to cut it into small pieces, make ice cream the centerpiece, and apologize.

I imagined that the cake would be light like an angel food cake. It was heavy like a pound cake and did not release from the pan as described (it fell apart) and was so dry I could barely swallow it.

This has never happened to me before with any recipe.

I'm in the mood to chuck that and the Bible . . . siding with the folks who say her recipes don't work.

I don't think I've ever seen such firm camps on a cookbook author before -- it's interesting.

If you are looking for a whipped cream cake, the best one I ever made/tasted was from Martha Stewart. It wasn't light as an angel cake, nor did it resemble a pound cake, but was so delicious. Sorry I can't quote where I found it--I suspect it was in her "Weddings" book, which was not returned to me from a prospective DIL when the engagement fell through.


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Someone just gave me this book and I immediately made the Whipped Cream Cake. The first time I've made an RLB cake. I've done her cookies and her pies.

Worst baking experience ever. I made it for a party and I was ashamed of it, had to cut it into small pieces, make ice cream the centerpiece, and apologize.

I imagined that the cake would be light like an angel food cake. It was heavy like a pound cake and did not release from the pan as described (it fell apart) and was so dry I could barely swallow it.

This has never happened to me before with any recipe.

I'm in the mood to chuck that and the Bible . . . siding with the folks who say her recipes don't work.

I don't think I've ever seen such firm camps on a cookbook author before -- it's interesting.

Hi Lindacakes. I have made Rose's Whipped Cream cake many times. Every time I bake it, I get raves and requests for the recipe. My cake was never heavy. Just the opposite, it is light without being too light. I like to glaze my cake because we like a little pop of sweetness on our baked goods. I always get raves for any cake I bake from Rose's books. Rose has a website with very knowledgeable members who can troubleshoot any issues, if you are interested.

Happy baking to you!

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/

Here are 2 pictures of my cake.

39698_150637214948126_57940_n.jpg

40939_150637238281457_4130965_n.jpg

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Here is Rose's youtube showing how she makes her Whipped Cream Cake

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I have no use for the Dorie Greenspan. RLB, especially The Bible, is essential for anyone interested in cakes. Carole Walter another good one, may "seem" more accessible than RLB but RLB is more precise so actually better for a novice. Martha Stewart's Baking Handbook also good.

Btw, a whipped cream cake IS a form of pound cake, but that doesn't mean it is heavy. Here is my old recipe, which I've made for decades. People like it.

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I agree janeer. I have found Rose's recipes to actually be easier once you see the pattern of her technique and they yield perfect results.

I just finished baking Rose's zucchini bread recipe from her Bread Bible. It is perfection. I glazed it with a brandy glaze and cannot wait for it to cool to try it.

I have also made Carole Walter's zucchini bread. Carole's is very good too but much more labor intense, in my opinion.

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