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"Heston Blumenthal at Home"


dougal
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Yes that's right. In reality you CAN slow roast at 170F (75C) ... your meat will just be done sooner. As long as you monitor what's going on you should be fine.

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw
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Thanks for all the advice. I ended up roasting it with the oven door propped ajar with a mitt and babysat it closely for five hours. Alas, my meat thermometer turned out to be less than accurate and after pulling at 60 and resting for an hour, the meat was still raw.

As I had used the resting hour to cook all the sides, I just cranked up the heat and gave it 15 mins. Was delicious, but I could have achieved the same result with far less fuss. oh well. The bone marrow sauce that accompanied was the real star.

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  • 1 month later...

I'm making a broth right now, and am going to purify it like Blumenthal shows with freezing it and letting it thaw. I guess it could be called 'ice filtration'

Anyways, I have done this once before, and remember that I was surprised by the amount of gelatine and elements left behind, and by the strong smell of it.

My question -

Has anyone come up with some good suggestions to use this 'leftover'? It seems a shame to just thrown it away.

Edited by jjahorn (log)
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  • 2 months later...

I am also a member of a couple of U.K. food forums and and we had a running topic on Cooking with Heston at Home. We found some of the amounts and sizes were wrong so contacted the Publishers "Bloomsbury" who were great and contacted Heston and his team. The problems were sorted out for us. Bloomsbury also said that the next edition would have these changed. I wonder if anyone on here had the same problems, one of which was for the lemon tart (page 310 in my copy) - here's my query - (5) The lemon tart on page 310, which serves 10-12 didn't work with a 20cm x 2cm deep tin. Maybe a larger one should be specified?

Their reply - A bigger tin should be used – 26cm wide x 2.5cm deep.

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I am also a member of a couple of U.K. food forums and and we had a running topic on Cooking with Heston at Home. We found some of the amounts and sizes were wrong so contacted the Publishers "Bloomsbury" who were great and contacted Heston and his team. The problems were sorted out for us. Bloomsbury also said that the next edition would have these changed. I wonder if anyone on here had the same problems, one of which was for the lemon tart (page 310 in my copy) - here's my query - (5) The lemon tart on page 310, which serves 10-12 didn't work with a 20cm x 2cm deep tin. Maybe a larger one should be specified?

Their reply - A bigger tin should be used – 26cm wide x 2.5cm deep.

Do you have a list of the errors you identifed in the book and the replies by the publisher ?

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Heston is typical of celebrity chefs when it comes to writing cookery books,they just take the money and are not interested in accuracy.When the likes of GOURMET had their test kitchens a different culture ruled.Now any thing goes take the money and to hell with the mug that bought the book.

Sid the Pig

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Hi Honkman, yes I do have a list and was going to paste it here, but read the rider at the bottom and I think I would be going into a copyright situation, so will paraphrase.

The ones that were going to be corrected in the next edition were the lemon tart (above) and the other was the chocolate ganache (page 332) the amounts should be halved and the ramekins should be 7cm wide and the ring cutter (for the ganache) should be 3cm wide.

I found the replies from the Fat Duck team rather offhand and curt, almost to the point of being rude. As if we should not have dared to query anything. I also queried the mushroom cream recipe (but the recipe was right) but said it would have been helpful to have known the size of the glass. I was told a Pousse cafe glass, which I'm afraid didn't really help me. By the way, it was really delicious and my guests were really impressed. Took a long time to make though and although really delicious I'm not sure I would do it again.

We also queried the amount of thyme in the parfait alcohol reduction (page 103) as the recipe stated '15g sprigs of thyme'. The person who was making it said she had just gone into into the garden and cut a handful of sprigs of thyme and counted and weighed them. 15 sprigs weighed 3 grams, 75 sprigs of thyme would have to be used to arrive at 15g and it did seem rather an overkill of thyme - we were told it was the right amount and that supermarkets sold 20g packets of thyme for about a £1.00. (Yeah right, people who buy this book don't know you can buy herbs!!!!)

We also queried the amount of Bois Boudron (page 267) and were told Heston had said in the intro that it was good for the BBQing and could be halved.

I think after the tone of the reply we just gave each other tips.

Everything that we made though was fantastic and I am still glad I have the book and will continue to try the recipes. Have decided that when I make the mushroom parfait though I won't add all the thyme at first. it will be a taste as you go recipe.

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That's good to know Ninagluck, we thought it was too much thyme - your comment gives me the impetus to make it now. His recipes do taste amazing don't they, well the ones I have made do. I keep meaning to blanch the garlic clove in milk as he suggests, but I don't often have milk around, maybe one day.

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