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Can we improve this "noodles & cheese" recipe?


Shel_B
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This is classic comfort food for me also. My mom's twist was to use medium sized shells instead of the noodles - the cottage cheese would get into the center of the shells so you could get it all in one bite.

Must use real butter and never margarine. Lots of fresh ground black pepper (my grandpa was Hungarian - we put pepper on everything).

Most important for me is the brand of cottage cheese - to me, the only acceptable brand is New York's Friendship brand, preferably Pot Cheese (which is large curd and 2% fat) though either the "regular" 4% fat or the "lowfat" 1% cottage cheeses from Friendship are also acceptable. I find other brands of cottage cheese too soupy for my taste (and mostly tasteless).

Yes, I found that there is a real defference between brands. I tried draining some through a sieve and it reduced the "soupiness" quite a bit. I prefer the 4% fat but some 2% gave me the results I like.

 ... Shel


 

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Pepper crushed in a mortar instead of freshly ground. Works for everything pasta.

Yes! I also tried adding some freshly-made salsa, and that was pretty good. Had to be sure to drain the salsa well, though ...

 ... Shel


 

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My mother's noodle kugel recipe has butter cottage cheese and sour cream. It also has a fair amount of sugar. I think as Pam R says, the sour cream makes it better. Baking it til the bits get crunchy is also great.

My father's Pasta con la Ricotta, has Ricotta, Sugar and Lemon Zest (as mentioned upthread) and is served lukewarm after having mixed the ingredients with the boiled pasta. (adding cooking liquid as necessary to loosen.)

Both divine. And classics I wouldn't mess with personally. :) I've heard of the former containing raisins, but that's not really to my taste

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Top with toasted, buttered breadcrumbs.

ETA: I should clarify. Fresh breadcrumbs, not the breadcrumbs in cans. Make fresh bread crumbs in a food processor, toss with melted butter, S&P. Spread out on a parchment- or foil-lined sheet pan, and brown in a 350 degree oven until they are golden brown. Occasionally stir them around, and watch they don't burn. They will add buttery crunchiness to your dish.

Edited by djyee100 (log)
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I also thought I was the only one to do this, picking it up from my mom (Polish) and adding my own twist. I use kluski noodles, which are thick and chewy. I fry up some onions, carmelized if I have the patience but just sauteed makes me just as happy. If I'm really hungry, kielbasa is included. When the noodles are done and drained, they are fried (like hash browns) so some get crispy/crunchy and add lots of black pepper. Dump in the onions and kielbasa. The cottage cheese goes on top so it's still cold. I love the temperature contrast and the mushy and crunchy of the kluski- heaven. Now I want this tonight as it's 43 freaking degrees here. I find Friendship brand cottage cheese to be the least watery and basically the only brand I buy. I just wish they would stop using #5 plastic as I can't recycle it here and I eat a ton of it.

ETA: I like Mrs Weiss' kluski best but New Mill will do in a pinch. I've used plain old egg noodles but they don't get crunchy enough and are too thin for my tastes.

Edited by karlos (log)
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  • 3 months later...

I think the beauty of lockshen and cheese (what we call this recipe in my family) is the simplicity. The addition we make to the egg noodles, butter, salt and cottage cheese is sour cream. Adds some creaminess and tang.

I haven't been able to recreate my grandmother's lockshen and cheese and I've been trying for close to 30 years. I wonder if there was sour cream in it. I also think she may have baked it because the noodles were sometimes a little crispy.

I'd love to try a traditional recipe if you feel like sharing! Thanks1

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I don't have a set recipe -- we never used one. Just boiled up some egg noodles in salted water, drain, add butter, cottage cheese, sour cream and salt to taste.

Now, if you take that and add some eggs, pour it into a greased pan and bake it you have a lockshen kugel with crispy bits (always served with more sour cream and often served with frozen strawberries in syrup).

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