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Plan: 2012 Candy and Confection Conference


RobertM
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I have a bit of a reputation for finding bargains - and this week Canadian Tire has it's infrared thermometers (usually $99) on for $29.99 - plus the tax of course. This particular unit seems to work very well for chocolate.

If anyone wants me to grab them one - let me know. Need to know before Thursday when the sale ends.

Would they be 110 V or 220 V? If 220, please grab me one (I'll bring a bigger suitcase :-) )

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I have a bit of a reputation for finding bargains - and this week Canadian Tire has it's infrared thermometers (usually $99) on for $29.99 - plus the tax of course. This particular unit seems to work very well for chocolate.

If anyone wants me to grab them one - let me know. Need to know before Thursday when the sale ends.

Would they be 110 V or 220 V? If 220, please grab me one (I'll bring a bigger suitcase :-) )

I think they operate on batteries (this, I believe: http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/6/Tools/MeasuringTools/SpecialtyMeasuring/PRD~0574554P/Mastercraft%2BDigital%2BTemperature%2BReader.jsp )!

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I have a bit of a reputation for finding bargains - and this week Canadian Tire has it's infrared thermometers (usually $99) on for $29.99 - plus the tax of course. This particular unit seems to work very well for chocolate.

If anyone wants me to grab them one - let me know. Need to know before Thursday when the sale ends.

Would they be 110 V or 220 V? If 220, please grab me one (I'll bring a bigger suitcase :-) )

Nine volt battery! So usable anywhere.

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I have a bit of a reputation for finding bargains - and this week Canadian Tire has it's infrared thermometers (usually $99) on for $29.99 - plus the tax of course. This particular unit seems to work very well for chocolate.

If anyone wants me to grab them one - let me know. Need to know before Thursday when the sale ends.

Would they be 110 V or 220 V? If 220, please grab me one (I'll bring a bigger suitcase :-) )

I think they operate on batteries (this, I believe: http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/6/Tools/MeasuringTools/SpecialtyMeasuring/PRD~0574554P/Mastercraft%2BDigital%2BTemperature%2BReader.jsp )!

Oops - missed that you'd already posted this.

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I just spoke to the Marriott; thank you to all who made their reservations. Just a note, that as of today, the hotel is sold out for both Friday and Saturday evening. Anyone wishing to make a last minute reservation, please let me know, perhaps I can help direct you to another hotel nearby.

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Hi Robert,

I have been reading the forum for ages, but just joined the society. I'd love to be a part of the Conference if possible. I don't need a hotel -- I live in Silver Spring MD. Happy to help with any local errands, as well. I have a 6 kg mol d'art, and a good supply of molds, magnetic and regular. I can't wait to meet all of you I have been following for years.

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Hi Robert,

I have been reading the forum for ages, but just joined the society. I'd love to be a part of the Conference if possible. I don't need a hotel -- I live in Silver Spring MD. Happy to help with any local errands, as well. I have a 6 kg mol d'art, and a good supply of molds, magnetic and regular. I can't wait to meet all of you I have been following for years.

Welcome Sarah - glad you've decided to join us.

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Hi, I thought I might share a little information about where I am in the chocolate learning process. I was in banking for 15 years, and in 2009 decided to move to Paris to attend Le Cordon Bleu for the patisserie program. When I returned home, I floundered for a while, making cupcakes, macarons, cakes, and cookies. Then I thought about what I really loved, caramel and chocolate. I started making chocolates at home, practicing tempering and gumming up every pot with sticky caramel. I found a commercial kitchen to rent by the hour and started selling 5 different chocolates later that year. In 2011, I focused on making more flavors and selling online. Now, I have 4 local retailers carrying my chocolates. I do everything myself, with the exception of my nephews making boxes for me. My best seller is balsamic vinegar caramel. I am interested in learning more about getting very clean closes on chocolate bases, sourcing quality ingredients at good prices, and airbrushing.

Here is the link to my blog - http://www.sdinparee.blogspot.com/

And my website is http://www.chouquette.us/ if anyone is interested.

Really looking forward to meeting everyone.

--Sarah Dwyer

Edited by heidih
Fix links (log)
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Starting to make piles of things to bring - looking back through the thread can't find the post about what book it is that Curls wants me to bring.

Donna can you remind me so I can add it to one of the piles?

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Curley's book sounds like something I should get. always looking for new ways to decorate dipped truffles.

He's got lots of neat ways to decorate the dipped squares - most of his truffles seem to be done with powders of some sort.

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Mette, I looked at some websites to try to figure out how man tonka beans I would want and I found that I could order them on Amazon! They are legally being sold for soap making and such. I ordered some, so maybe I will bring tonka bean chocolates!

I am getting SO excited for the conference- Kerry I think I need to follow your lead and start making a pile of stuff to bring!!!! So looking forward to meeting everyone!

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Met yesterday with the chef at the school. He is asking if anyone has any food allergies. Can you PM me if you do and specifically to what? Shellfish? Peanuts? etc?

I also found out that the school does not have 220 in the kitchens so bringing my JKV is out. I'm still going to bring the ACMC tabletop.

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Just bought the Curley book - I'm enjoying it - lots of nice decorating ideas for enrobed chocolates. What's the Valrhona book like?

I really like it, apart from the mouthwatering pictures, it explains a lot of basic patisserie techniques, for example what are the 6 techniques to make a chocolate mousse, when to use each and the possible pitfalls. I finally manage to make a Pate a bombe chocolate mousse without having the chocolate clump up :raz: It also has a chocolate section with some nice recipes by Jean Paul Hevin.

William Curley is one of the best chocolatiers I have tasted- he uses amazing chocolate (Amedei), creates very unique and interesting flavors and manages to get a perfect texture every time (although I do think that his dipping results aren't perfect, I assume they aren't using an enrober).

I also usually like decorating my truffles with some edible powder that reflects the flavor inside- I made orange powder from orange skins for an orange truffle, peanut butter powder for my PB&J, raspberry powder for raspberry truffles and etc.

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I had hoped at the conference to bring up the proposed group buy of Perfect temperer/enrober units that one of our eG members is organizing. It appears that this has moved ahead at an unexpected speed and that given the excellent price they were given that this may happen before the conference. So if anyone is interested, drop me a PM and I'll hook you up with the member who is organizing it before the conference.

I had great hopes today that another goodie I found at Canadian Tire might prove useful to us - it is a Richard trim guide - stainless steel, nice clean edge on it. I had hoped it would serve well as a scraper for molds - and it does. However because the blade is so narrow cleaning the chocolate from the scraper turned out to be a problem. It's OK with the Selmi, because I can clean it off on the Selmi's scraper - unfortunately I doesn't look like it will work well with a bowl.

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Long expected, but now final and official - there's no way I can get clear of the increasingly misnamed day job for the conference... and it looks like the weekend following, too. I'm a little envious, but mostly happy for those who get to do it. Have fun for me!

If things work as I hope, I'll be able to send a piece or two to represent me.

Best wishes-

Pat Santucci

Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

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