Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Aperitifs


schaem
 Share

Recommended Posts

Sounds good, but there's always kir, kir royale, vermouth cassis, compari and...soda, or orange juice, or tonic, or compari, gin and sweet vermouth (well, OK, that's a Negroni), Pernod and water, Pernod and OJ. Cheers.

I'm hollywood and I approve this message.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm curious about the Vermout-based aperitfs.  At work we just got some Italian single-producer (artisanal?) vermouths that are really interesting, but I haven't had much exposure to them.

Sounds like they might be enjoyed more straight then mixed up. Kind of like using good champagne in a Mimosa.

I'm hollywood and I approve this message.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree, but is Italian Vermouth usually served room temp, neat?

Not in our house!

But my husband's grandmother was Italian. Red vermouth was the only alcohol in her house, except for a two gallon bottle of Gallo for cooking purposes.

Whenever Important Company came over, out came the vermouth...Gallo too, as I recall. Not, er, Artisanal.

And she always served it at room temp. My parents had to consure a glass or two ar nine in the morning. They sure aren't teetotallers, but it was a little early for them.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm curious about the Vermout-based aperitfs.  At work we just got some Italian single-producer (artisanal?) vermouths that are really interesting, but I haven't had much exposure to them.

Yum. Absolutely yum.

When I was in Italy, I discovered my very favorite aperitif. The Italians called it a 'Rosso e Bianco' -- 'Red & White.'

Mix equal parts red vermouth and white vermouth. Serve in martini glass, with a beautiful slice of lemon floating about in it.

This is best served cold. I actually like it so much I keep my vermouths in the fridge; but when I am elsewhere, stir it with ice cubes in a shaker, and strain into the glass.

Heavenly.

And I envy you your 'really interesting' and 'artisanal' vermouths. :rolleyes:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sweet vermouth on the rocks with a twist of lemon is a really nice starter as is Lillet Blanc with an orange slice. Of course kir and kir royale (as mentioned above) are classic. My favorite if I can get it is a glass of chilled Pineau des Charentes. Often I will scan the house cocktail menu for anything that sounds interesting and different.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sweet vermouth on the rocks with a twist of lemon is a really nice starter as is Lillet Blanc with an orange slice. Of course kir and kir royale (as mentioned above) are classic. My favorite if I can get it is a glass of chilled Pineau des Charentes. Often I will scan the house cocktail menu for anything that sounds interesting and different.

Negroni.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm curious about the Vermout-based aperitfs.  At work we just got some Italian single-producer (artisanal?) vermouths that are really interesting, but I haven't had much exposure to them.

I love amaros, which I think is what you mean by single-producer vermouths? Amaro Lucano is my favorite. Carpano's Antica formula red vermouth is really good too, and a pretty decent deal. I like it better than Punt e Mes. Antico amaro di Serravalle I wasn't so crazy about, it was a little sweet for me, and we still haven't cracked open the bottle Amaro Nonino yet. You can drink them pretty much however you like. Sometimes I drink them neat, at room temp, sometimes I use them in place of regular sweet vermouth in cocktails (they make a much nicer manhattan) and sometimes I drink them on the rocks with a slice of lemon or the same with a splash of mineral water.

regards,

trillium

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. Amaros. Thank you.

Trillium, I noticed on another thread you said you were going to make an Amaro, could you give us some details please? Perhaps an Amaro thread is in order as I plan to begin "investigating" the ones we have at work.

Edited by schaem (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was in Italy, I discovered my very favorite aperitif.  The Italians called it a 'Rosso e Bianco' --  'Red & White.'

Mix equal parts red vermouth and white vermouth.  Serve in martini glass, with a beautiful slice of lemon floating about in it.

This is best served cold.  I actually like it so much I keep my vermouths in the fridge; but when I am elsewhere, stir it with ice cubes in a shaker, and strain into the glass.

Jaymes, I have been very curious about rosso e biancos. Have you made them since your return? Do you think they would be good with everyday vermouth like Noilly Pratt or Martini?

I keep my vermouth in the fridge, too. Doesn't it keep better?

I am very fond of proseco before dinner. And French 75's are very good, too. I have been experimenting with a variety of champagne cocktails--maybe a new thread is in order!

Also, as Nightscotsman says, a nice glass of Lillet with an orange slice is always a good thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jaymes, I have been very curious about rosso e biancos. Have you made them since your return?  Do you think they would be good with everyday vermouth like Noilly Pratt or Martini?

I keep my vermouth in the fridge, too.  Doesn't it keep better?

I'm a poor girl. And "everyday" vermouths are all I can afford. And I have a Rosso e Bianco two or three times a week. I can attest that they are very, very tasty. :biggrin:

Viva Italia.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
I accidently bought cinzano instead of campari once. Now I don't know how to use cinzano. Is this just a normal vermouth? Or are there any cocktails/aperitifs that specifically call fro Cinzano?

Do you have Cinzano Bianco? (Cinzano also makes a dry white vermouth and a sweet one). The Bianco is fruity and sweeter than the dry.

If so, you can try it on the rocks or with a splash of soda. I like it with gin (about 2 parts gin to one part Bianco) with a big squeeze of lemon.

You can also use it in place of dry white vermouth, but it will change the flavor of the drink.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Tho' this thread is old - seems like a rather timeless topic - so here's a round up of aperitifs around our house...

Warm to hot day - steak/sophisticated eats after...

3 parts Punt e Mes

1 part Campari

Splash of soda

Lemon rind...

When the day's not as hot it's...

2 parts Martini & Rossi Red

1 part Martini & Rossi White

Lemon rind

Cooler/Cold...?

Port (20 yr Tawney) or single malt scotch (I prefer Lagavulin...)

Snacks for above are usually an assortment of olives, roasted almonds and, sometimes, cheese twists.

Finally - really hot day or spicy food/kinda simple eats...

Drinking Widmer's Bros Hefeweizen pretty regularly and snack is corn tortilla chips w/ salsa and/or guac.

Hey - I am a surfer, don'cha kno'...

~waves

~waves

"When you look at the face of the bear, you see the monumental indifference of nature. . . . You see a half-disguised interest in just one thing: food."

Werner Herzog; NPR interview about his documentary "Grizzly Man"...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...