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ISI whip espumas and mousses?


jrshaul
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I'm a big fan of mousses and creams, and would quite like to make use of the ISI half-liter whipping container I recently acquired. However, I haven't had much luck so far - the recipe I tried for chocolate mousse, which consists solely of heavy cream and chocolate, was somewhat limp and didn't have much body to it.

I've seen some nifty recipes using combinations of fruit, cream, and gelatin, and would very much like to make some of my own. I recently found a video of an ISI whip used to prepare a passionfruit and coconut dessert that had none of my consistency problems, and was wondering if anyone could suggest how I might replicate it.

http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl122.html

I've also noticed that some recipes call for gelatin, while others rely solely on heavy cream. Is there a general set of proportions that can be applied to this sort of thing?

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I have had great success using Ideas in Food's recipe for peanut butter custard, but then letting it set in an isi, and foaming using 2 charges. It uses iota and kappa carrageenen.

I just replace the maple syrup and peanut butter with differrent flavorings.

The texture is quite unique, somewhere between whipped cream, and marshmellow. You can then even freeze it for a light frozen mousse.

Mike

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ideas in food peanut butter custard adaptation

200g maple syrup

1010 g whole milk

7.1g iota

1.4 g kappa

200g creamy peanut butter

4g fine sea salt

blend iota and kappa with maple syrup and 25% of the milk-blend until hydrated

put in saucepan

Add rest of the milk and bring to 185F

nuke peanut butter then add with salt to saucepan

combine fully, a blender helps

pour into isi canister

or into molds if just making custard

let it set in canister in fridge without cap on for a couple of hours(or cool in ice bath) - this gives you a better texture

add 2 charges shaking vigorously after each

Dispense marshmellow-like mousse!

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I have had great success using Ideas in Food's recipe for peanut butter custard, but then letting it set in an isi, and foaming using 2 charges. It uses iota and kappa carrageenen.

I just replace the maple syrup and peanut butter with differrent flavorings.

The texture is quite unique, somewhere between whipped cream, and marshmellow. You can then even freeze it for a light frozen mousse.

Mike

That's a rather interesting formulation. How would I go about accounting for the lack of protein and fat in the peanut butter? And where locally can I expect to find the carrageenan?

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I have done this with a couple of other flavors, for example coffee. I just replaced the peanut butter and maple syrup with sugar and coffee-infused milk. Worked fine. You will just need to do it and test it to see if its a texture you are looking for. It is a lighter texture than whipped cream, there is an "uncooked meringue" quality about it.

Do a search on modernist ingredients here, there are several topics. Willpowder for example sells them.

Mike

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I have done this with a couple of other flavors, for example coffee. I just replaced the peanut butter and maple syrup with sugar and coffee-infused milk. Worked fine. You will just need to do it and test it to see if its a texture you are looking for. It is a lighter texture than whipped cream, there is an "uncooked meringue" quality about it.

Do a search on modernist ingredients here, there are several topics. Willpowder for example sells them.

Mike

I'm gonna have to try that if I can find some a bit cheaper. I don't think I can really justify spending $80 to make a batch of mousse. :D

On a related note, has anyone had any luck with gelatin?

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iSi has a book of recipes and techniques called "The Trick with the Whip".

"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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iSi has a book of recipes and techniques called "The Trick with the Whip".

It looks pretty spiffy, but I've yet to get anything in the whip quite right yet so I figure I should hold off 'till I get the hang of it.

I did find some recipes on their website, though:

http://www.isi.at/consumer/recipes/creative-whip-recipes/en/

I also found a demo on YouTube where they make the pepper and mango mousse. Here's hoping mine comes out...

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What texture are you after? I've been using my iSi Gourmet Whip for quite a while with great success. You have to make sure you shake your iSi VERY, VERY vigorously to mix your mixture and the NOS before dispensing it. I normally use heavy whipping cream, sugar and/or honey, and fruit puree for flavoring. I had problems the first couple of times I used my iSi, with the mousse coming out very runny. No problems after I started shaking the iSi very vigorously before dispensing.

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What texture are you after? I've been using my iSi Gourmet Whip for quite a while with great success. You have to make sure you shake your iSi VERY, VERY vigorously to mix your mixture and the NOS before dispensing it. I normally use heavy whipping cream, sugar and/or honey, and fruit puree for flavoring. I had problems the first couple of times I used my iSi, with the mousse coming out very runny. No problems after I started shaking the iSi very vigorously before dispensing.

I've been shaking it pretty well, but I suspect the liquids gain viscosity very heavily when setting. Maybe I should shake during the cooling process?

I'm hoping for a very stiff texture, not unlike the traditional gelatin/egg white mousse made in a mixer. I might actually try adding a bit of gelatin to the ISI recipe and see what happens.

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What texture are you after? I've been using my iSi Gourmet Whip for quite a while with great success. You have to make sure you shake your iSi VERY, VERY vigorously to mix your mixture and the NOS before dispensing it. I normally use heavy whipping cream, sugar and/or honey, and fruit puree for flavoring. I had problems the first couple of times I used my iSi, with the mousse coming out very runny. No problems after I started shaking the iSi very vigorously before dispensing.

I've been shaking it pretty well, but I suspect the liquids gain viscosity very heavily when setting. Maybe I should shake during the cooling process?

I'm hoping for a very stiff texture, not unlike the traditional gelatin/egg white mousse made in a mixer. I might actually try adding a bit of gelatin to the ISI recipe and see what happens.

The cooling process? AFAIK, you want your mix to be well chilled before charging it with NO2. And it does need some time to rest before dispensing.

A little gelatin should help, as long as it's not so much that it solidifies in the canister. I use the ISI a lot and I'm not sure I've ever gotten a really stiff foam like a traditional chocolate mousse. Right now I'm doing a chocolate mousse that is a creme anglaise in the ISI. The first few batches were not stable enough, so I added some cocoa butter, and it is more stable now but still very light.

Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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Just a question on the iSi whip.

Everytime I make a recipe, It comes out fine when I test it. Then I put it in the fridge, since it's cream based and it can't be left out at room temperature, right? But then, it gets too hard and thick for it to dispense and I use all my NO2 and nothing comes out.

What am I doing wrong? The commercial whipped cream stays in the fridge at the grocery store and it comes out fine. I can't seem to get mine to work. It only works if I don't put it in the fridge.

I think there is something wrong with that.

Thanks!

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Just a question on the iSi whip.

Everytime I make a recipe, It comes out fine when I test it. Then I put it in the fridge, since it's cream based and it can't be left out at room temperature, right? But then, it gets too hard and thick for it to dispense and I use all my NO2 and nothing comes out.

What am I doing wrong? The commercial whipped cream stays in the fridge at the grocery store and it comes out fine. I can't seem to get mine to work. It only works if I don't put it in the fridge.

I think there is something wrong with that.

Thanks!

Is it just for recipes with gelatine and such in them - or does it happen when you do plain cream?

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Both. With plain cream and with gelatin.

Thanks.

When you fill the canister with the liquid, I chill for a couple of hour first then do the first charge & shake vigorously then the 2nd gas & shake again. Chill for an hour or so then reshake & use.

The Chef Hermes blog

Can be followed on Twitter: @chefhermes

Or Facebook:Chef Hermes group page

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Chef Hermes,

I can only ref it for one hour?

Kerry,

What could be wrong with it? It works fine at room temperature.

Here's a sample:

Heavy Cream 1 cup

Dijon Mustard 1 TBSP

Salt and Pepper

Thanks!

The discharge port may not be opening fully - so fine before the liquid thickens up but not after?

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Chef Hermes,

I can only ref it for one hour?

Kerry,

What could be wrong with it? It works fine at room temperature.

Here's a sample:

Heavy Cream 1 cup

Dijon Mustard 1 TBSP

Salt and Pepper

Thanks!

How big is your ISI and how many NO2 do you add? And did you strain to remove all large particles of pepper?

When I've done either vegan chocolate mousse - essentially chocolate and water - or a gelatin mousse the temp was crucial. Too cold and it wouldn't come out, too warm = too runny, room temp was just right. Sometimes needed to run the canister under warm water and shake to get the desired temp/texture. Of course heating the canister while it is under pressure is not recommended unless you have the thermo-whip, but a little warm water to bring the temp up a few degrees seemed safe enough.

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