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Making white chocolate white


nanefy
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Hey,

Newbie here, just got my account confirmed today!! yippee!!!!

Anyhoozle, my question is this - I need to colour my white chocolate but I'm assuming that because white chocolate isn't actually white that it will effect the outcome of my colours. So I found a product by Deco Flair which is pure white powder colour for chocolate. I just wondered if anyone has used it and if so, how white did it make the chocolate? I'm looking for a pure white colour (or as close as I can get to it). I know that you can get candy melts/merckens in pure white but I refuse to use them because they are full of hydrogenated vegetable fats and other nasties that I won't use in my products.

Any info would be fab :)

Edited by nanefy (log)
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Hey,

Newbie here, just got my account confirmed today!! yippee!!!!

Anyhoozle, my question is this - I need to colour my white chocolate but I'm assuming that because white chocolate isn't actually white that it will effect the outcome of my colours. So I found a product by Deco Flair which is pure white powder colour for chocolate. I just wondered if anyone has used it and if so, how white did it make the chocolate? I'm looking for a pure white colour (or as close as I can get to it). I know that you can get candy melts/merckens in pure white but I refuse to use them because they are full of hydrogenated vegetable fats and other nasties that I won't use in my products.

Any info would be fab :)

You won't be able to get white chocolate snow white - but you could mix the white powder colour for chocolate with some cocoa butter and get something you could use to put white in a mold.

Oh yeah, and welcome nanefy to eGullet!

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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This pastry chef uses titanium dioxide to make white chocolate white

http://www.masterchef.com.au/zumbo-v8-cake.htm

Wow this is fantastic!! Titanium dioxide is FAR cheaper than the powder from Deco Relief and in actual fact I'm starting to think that the powder from Deco Relief is very likely Titanium Dioxide which they've repackaged and whacked an expensive price on it!! I've also just read that the dioxide turns the chocolate super bright white which is exactly what I'm looking for. Thanks for this info!

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sorry, one more question - does the titanium dioxide have to be food grade? Are there different grades? I obviously don't want to poison anyone! lol

Best if it is. I've used some non food grade stuff once for a project that wasn't going to be eaten - but I'm not sure if they do anything to the stuff for chocolate that the don't for the stuff for makeup - but it didn't work particularly well.

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I'm just basing this on my experience of getting sunblock in my mouth (the stuff I use on my lips when I'm on the motorcycle, to be precise), but I'm hoping this brilliantly white chocolate is intended just for show, because frankly, although it isn't horrible, titanium dioxide is not a real treat.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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It's for dipping, it's mainly to get a white base colour so that I can get pure colours i.e. today I made red, but because the white chocolate is creamy coloured it made it more of a salmon red than a red red. I've already bought the TD so I'll have a play around with it and see what I think. I might not need that much for what I need, so I might get away with it. It's used to make skimmed milk more 'palatable' apparently lol!

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Ti02 is the ONLY white colorant approved that you can use to whiten chocolate, actually.

Yes there are food and non food grades.

It will come to you as a white powder, very very fine. if you try to simply blend it into your chocolate, you'll get a lumpy mess. best to calculate how much you think you'll need (i'd start with 0.2-0.4%), take out a small amount of chocolate, and mix your titanium into that to make a paste. you'll probably have to work at it for quite a bit to get it dispersed. once you're happy with the dispersion, slowly add more liquid chocolate to your paste (i'd advise against doing the other way round). the more agitation you can give it the better. keep it away from brass or you'll likely get some other colors you don't want. if you've got the ability to send it through a small chocolate refiner, that's the idea way to disperse it.

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