• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Fat Guy

Jam, Jelly, Preserves: nomenclature

14 posts in this topic

A discussion around the family lunch table leads me to come here for authoritative answers: What are the proper definitions of and differences between jelly, jam and related products?


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll jump in with my understanding of the terms.

A jelly is made from juice only, should be clear/translucent and contain sufficient pectin to hold its shape.

A jam is a softer texture and contains fruit pulp and/or seeds.

A fruit butter is spreadable and made by cooking down fruit pulp until smooth, with varying amounts of sugar and spices.

Are chutneys just considered a preserve? That's how I would classify them. Same with whole fruit preserved for storage.

Conserves and confits seem to be used more in terms of fruit suspended in a sugary mix, or do other people define them this way?

Oops, confit can also refer to meats, can't it?


Edited by FauxPas (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's what I was taught:

Jellies are made primarily from juice and may have small inclusions of fruit but never seeds and never loose pulp. They've got enough pectin in them to hold their own shape when scooped from the jar; the best ones should have a gelatine-like consistency.

Jams are made from whole fruit, contain pulp and possibly seeds, and have a lower sugar and pectin content than jellies. They should hold their shape only very gently when dropped from a spoon or knife, and should spread fairly easily.

Fruit butters are smooth, contain only pulp and juice, and no seeds, and should be soft and easily spreadable. Spices are often featured.

Preserves are chunky, may or may not hold their shape, and should have almost no sugar in them at all - they're more about the natural flavour of the fruit/veggies or the flavour of the spices used. I'd include Chutneys here, as well as chunky ketchups, salsas, and kimchee.

Conserves are chunky, may or may not hold their shape, and feature sugar heavily, often before the flavour of the fruit. Peaches and Strawberries in syrup fall into this category. Confits are the same thing, but with the syrup blended together with the fruit to form a butter-like spread.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And marmalade is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget curds. Fruit juice or puree (seedless) that is thickened or "jelled" with egg yolks.

Jelly can also be made with wine, technically a fruit juice, cordials distilled from flowers (elderflower and rose, for instance) &etc.

Marmalade counts as "preserves" - the original being made from marmelos, quince in our language.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having a flashback we called jams and preserves marmalade (sp?) in our German dialect as a kid

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Marmelade" is the German word you are thinking of. It has somewhat fallen out of use in Germany due to a EU regulation that limits "Marmelade" to citrus fruits due to UK pressure. Commercially, everything else has to be called "Konfitüre" (which originally only meant confit, i.e. with pieces of fruit). However, there is an exception clause for Austria where "Konfitüre" was almost totally unknown before accession to the EU.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not very precise about it, but my mental image is that jelly is completely smooth, preserves have some of the original fruit texture, and marmalade is a citrus preserve that includes the skin. I'm a sucker for marmalade.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jelly is made from fruit juice. Jam  uses the actual fruit.  Marmalade is made with citrus fruit pulp and peel and has no pectin. Not sure about chutney. I think it is more of a relish

 

Edit:  I usually opt for jam.


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I'm off on these descriptions, please feel free to correct me.  This is how I understand the differences to be.

 

Preserves and jam are similar, and often the terms are used interchangeably.  However, jam often, if not always, uses mashed fruit, and the fruit pieces are frequently smaller than the pieces in preserves.  Preserves use larger pieces of fruit, and no mashing is involved.  Jelly is made by using the juice of fruit, and is jelled with the use of pectin.  Preserves and jam can be made without pectin.

 

Marmalade is made using citrus, such as orange, and includes the peels.

 

My preference is for preserves, with ample sized pieces of fruit, and my preference is for preserves made with stone fruit, especially apricots, peaches, or cherries.  Sometimes a nice marmalade will float my boat.


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jelly is made from fruit juice. Jam  uses the actual fruit.  Marmalade is made with citrus fruit pulp and peel and has no pectin. Not sure about chutney. I think it is more of a relish

 

Edit:  I usually opt for jam.

I think chutney is usually cooked, incorporates pieces of things (be it fruit, ginger, herbs, etc). I always think of it as having a bit of spice, more of a savory/sweet.

I can't remember the last time I ate jelly (as a young kid, PB&J with grape jelly was a given, but I later developed a taste for PB&strawberry preserves). Preserves are nice to mix into hot oatmeal, so you get it melted and have the pieces of fruit.

A related question is, would fruit butter be an ultra-smooth jam?


"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jams, jellies, marmalades are cooked

 

Im big on marmalade, tart, chunky

 

grapefruit when I can get it, Lime is Devine

 

Good Orange perfectly fine.  TJ's has the orange  its good enough

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Darienne
      Pannukakku has become a new favorite in the McAuley household. (LCBO Food & Wine, winter season 2016).  We've been using Maple Syrup...made with DH's help in a local sugar shack...but the recipe actually calls for birch syrup.

      Does anyone know where to buy it in Ontario?  Any grocery stores carry it?  Specialty stores?  Toronto? What about in the Cambridge/Kitchener/Waterloo area?
       
      Thanks.
    • By cyalexa
      Salsa Para Enchiladas  
      3 ancho chiles
      2 New Mexico chiles
      2 chipotle chiles
      1 clove garlic, sliced
      2 TB flour
      2 TB vegetable oil
      1 tsp vinegar
      ¾ tsp salt
      ¼ tsp dried oregano
      2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid
      Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
    • By JAZ
      In this topic on sweet potato salad, Jaymes said (about mayonnaise):
      I have to disagree: while some cooks here in Atlanta use it, most that I know prefer Hellman's. I certainly do. Duke's is oddly sweet -- halfway to Miracle Whip, in my opinion -- and I can pick it out immediately in things like tuna or potato salad when it's used. If I were faced with the choice of Duke's or nothing on a sandwich, I think I'd have to choose the latter.
      Am I missing something? Do people really like Duke's? Are there other brands worth trying?
    • By Jambalyle
      Hi!
      Before we launched our project, I followed Melissa's remodel thread (congrats Melissa) and links to other kitchen remodel threads and I am continually awed by the inspiration and recommendations offered by the eGullet community during those projects. I want to get a piece of that action during our remodel.
      Demolition began on June 20, with an estimated 6-month project duration. The impetus for our remodel was the addition of a master bedroom and bath to transform our tiny 2 BR 1 BA into a modest 3BR 2BA. In addition, we are transforming and expanding the back of the house to create a "great" room that will combine a new kitchen, dining and family room.
      I will post plans and initial pictures in a subsequent post to give everyone a sense of the scope of our project. But first...
      Yesterday, we met (again) with our kitchen designers and appliance people to hammer out our appliance wants, needs, and desires. Here is where we netted out:
      Range – Wolf 48” R486C (6 burner, grill), w/ Island trim (is trim necessary?)
      Hood – Independent 27” x 54” Incline INHL54SS (w/ heat lamps)
      Blower – Independent CFMR1400 (external)
      Dishwasher – Miele Platinum edition G2150SCSS
      Microwave – GE Monogram 1.0 CF Stainless ZEM200SF
      Refrigerator – GE Monogram 42” built-in Stainless w/dispenser – ZISS420DRSS
      Beverage Center – GE Monogram 24” Stainless ZDBC240NBS (we're not willing to pay $600 more for privacy glass feature!)
      Sink – Franke 30”x18”x9” Stainless under mount
      Anyway... we would love to get some reaction to our selections before they hit the SOLD key on the cash register! Thanks! -Lyle
      PS: I know the Wolf is wimpy at 16,000 BTU per burner, but are there other reasons I should reconsider?
    • By JohnT
      For those folk who have access to a fig tree or two, here is a recipe for Green Fig Preserve inherited from my fathers recipes. The resulting product is magic on buttered toast and with cheese. The figs must be picked before they ripen and soften.
      Whole Green Fig Preserve
      Ingredients:
      100 green figs
      2 tablespoons bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
      3.4 litres water
      Method:
      Scrub the figs and cut a cross into the end opposite the stalk.
      Mix the water and bicarbonate of soda and soak the figs overnight.
      Remove from the water and weigh the figs, recording the weight.
      Place into clean boiling water and boil for 15 minutes or until just soft.
      Drain and then dry the figs well, removing excess water.
      Syrup:
      For each 500g figs or part thereof, mix 500ml water with 500g sugar.
      Boil the syrup until it just starts to thicken.
      Add the figs and boil until the syrup is thick.
      Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice for each 250g figs and just bring to the boil again before removing from the heat and letting cool.
      Bottle the figs and cover with the syrup.
      Note 1: If the syrup froths whilst boiling, add a small lump of butter.
      Note 2: A small stick of ginger can be added during the boiling process to add a slightly different flavour.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.