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Darienne

Making Cheese from Sour Cream

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Looked this one up on eG six ways to Sunday and couldn't find anything.

DH bought too much sour cream...it was a deal...?...and now I don't want to make a cake or pudding or whatever with it. You can't freeze it. However, I did find a couple of recipes about making a cheese from it.

Mix the sour cream with whatever spices you want (none in our case, I guess). Drain it into a bowl in the fridge for 2-3 days sitting in cheesecloth which is then in a strainer. That's it.

If no one has tried it and can report about it, I'll report back in 2-3 days. :smile:


Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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Darienne

I've done this numerous times using either sour cream or yogurt, and the process I follow is the same as you describe. Some advocate leaving the bowl at room temperature for 12-24 hours then into the refrigerator for another 2 days or so. Not understanding the rationale behind that method, I've never done it. Just straight to the refrigerator.

I typically add a mix of herbs and/or spices. One of my favorites is to simply add some zatar.

Good luck. Let us know how it comes out.

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Naturally I had never heard of Zatar before...learn, learn, learn...and have now two definitions for it from Wikipedia. I left out all spice because I really had no idea what I wanted to end up with or what I would then do with it.

I could still rescue it from its pouch and add something. Seeing as I am right out of zatar, what else could you suggest?


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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Naturally I had never heard of Zatar before...learn, learn, learn...and have now two definitions for it from Wikipedia. I left out all spice because I really had no idea what I wanted to end up with or what I would then do with it.

I could still rescue it from its pouch and add something. Seeing as I am right out of zatar, what else could you suggest?

Dill would be nice.

Zatar is just thyme, sesame seeds and something acidic - typically sumac - but a little lemon juice would work.

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Dill would be nice.

Zatar is just thyme, sesame seeds and something acidic - typically sumac - but a little lemon juice would work.

I'll try the Zatar mix.

Dill is my most unfavorite of the herbs. It's also the central ingredient in a bowl of chicken soup which I threw at my DH's head almost 46 years ago when I was 8 1/2 months pregnant. Last time I ever allowed dill in the house. :raz:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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Zatar is an spice and herb blend common to Middle Eastern countries. Though the basics remain pretty much the same there are countless versions that vary by country, and the regions within each country. Here's a simple Syrian version. You can find many more recipes via Google. You probably have most of the ingredients on hand, or they're readily available. Many of the recipes call for the use of whole spices such as cumin seeds, sesame seeds, etc. When I add zatar to the cheese, I lightly toast and grind all whole spices beforehand.


Edited by dls (log)

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Started the 'cheese' on June 28th...it's now July 1st. The cheese is wonderful. It's the best cream cheese I have ever eaten. I mixed the sour cream with thyme, cumin, sesame seeds, salt, pepper, smoked paprika in no particular fashion...until it tasted good to me.

Thanks for the help, DLS & Kerry.


Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

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Added information (Ontario prices and measurements):

Kraft cream cheese: $3.19 for 250 grams, and 1 TBSP = 45 calories

Beatrice sour cream: $1.48 for 500 ml, and 1 TBSP = 25 calories

So not only is my sour cream cheese tastier by far than the Kraft, it also has fewer calories and costs far less. I did not weigh the cheese before we used it last night on crackers and this morning on toast but I still have 200 grams left. Next time I'll weigh the sour cream before I start the process and then after the process is over.


Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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Added information (Ontario prices and measurements):

Kraft cream cheese: $3.19 for 250 grams, and 1 TBSP = 45 calories

Beatrice sour cream: $1.48 for 500 ml, and 1 TBSP = 25 calories

So not only is my sour cream cheese tastier by far than the Kraft, it also has fewer calories and costs far less. I did not weigh the cheese before we used it last night on crackers and this morning on toast but I still have 200 grams left. Next time I'll weigh the sour cream before I start the process and then after the process is over.

Bear of very little brain that I am. The caloric value of the sour cream cheese would be just as high, if not higher, that that of the processed cream cheese, after the liquid is drained out of the sour cream. Thank you all or not pointing out what an idiot I am. :wacko:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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Glad it worked out well for you, Darienne. For a comparison, try it sometime using yogurt.

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I do this all the time with yoghurt, but rather than mix in the spices, I only mix in salt (to help the drainage along) and then roll balls of the drained cheese in spices - some in za'atar, some in dried mint, some in chilli and lemon zest, or whatever. That way you can get heaps of different flavours out of the one batch and the balls store really well in the fridge under a film of olive oil.

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I do this all the time with yoghurt, but rather than mix in the spices, I only mix in salt (to help the drainage along) and then roll balls of the drained cheese in spices - some in za'atar, some in dried mint, some in chilli and lemon zest, or whatever. That way you can get heaps of different flavours out of the one batch and the balls store really well in the fridge under a film of olive oil.

Hi RRO, this sounds very good. I have made things out of yoghurt, including cheese, but never with a firm purpose in mind. I like your descriptions. Thanks.

If I live forever, I'll get to try all the ideas I have stored up ahead of me. :raz:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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If I live forever, I'll get to try all the ideas I have stored up ahead of me. :raz:

I know, I feel that way too! I have lists all over the place of food things I want to try, or learn about, or experiment with..it gets (joyfully) overwhelming, doesn't it?

Re the cheese - one of my very favourite summer breakfasts is yoghurt cheese smooshed onto wedges of fresh Lebanese pita bread, muddled in more olive oil and za'atar, and eaten with chunks of perfectly ripe tomato, and maybe some black olives. Some strong mint tea, and bliss! Mmm!

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Started the 'cheese' on June 28th...it's now July 1st. The cheese is wonderful. It's the best cream cheese I have ever eaten. I mixed the sour cream with thyme, cumin, sesame seeds, salt, pepper, smoked paprika in no particular fashion...until it tasted good to me.

Thanks for the help, DLS & Kerry.

Very cool! I'm gonna try that!


Don't ask. Eat it.

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I wonder if you could use it to make, say, a cheesecake?

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I wonder if you could use it to make, say, a cheesecake?

That is my thought also... I don't have enough to make a regular cake except I could make a teensy weensy one I guess. :wink:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I know, I feel that way too! I have lists all over the place of food things I want to try, or learn about, or experiment with..it gets (joyfully) overwhelming, doesn't it?

Re the cheese - one of my very favourite summer breakfasts is yoghurt cheese smooshed onto wedges of fresh Lebanese pita bread, muddled in more olive oil and za'atar, and eaten with chunks of perfectly ripe tomato, and maybe some black olives. Some strong mint tea, and bliss! Mmm!

And do you make your za'atar or make it and if so, how?


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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