Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Cook-Off 56: Savory-Filled Pastry


David Ross
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've probably had mine for over 20 years and the only thing that ever happened is one of the plastic handles came out of the hole it fits in. Superglue fixed that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David, have you ever come across super jumbo ones (like, 4-6" across?) I pleat all of my empanadas by hand, and have only come across the teeny ones that are good for personal consumption empanadas but not so hot for sale ones, which have to be big.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 years later...

This morning it's 22 outside and heavy snow that will fall into tomorrow.  So I happened to remember this Cook-Off and thought what a good day to go back and look through the thread for some ideas on making a savory filled pastry.  Right now I'm thinking empanadas based on what we discussed here, but this time doing them with crab.  I may serve it with my roasted tomatillo salsa.  I think these will be delicious in a warm home on New Years Eve and Day.  And with the convenience of grocery delivery, I won't have to venture out to a store today.  What kinds of savory filled pastries sound good to you?

 

  • Like 1
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phyllo dough is my easy default and I like the crisp and flakiness. The boys were enamored of ones filled with a picadillo type mixture. I cut 4 or or 5 inch wide piece of dough, brushed with melted butter, generous dollop of filling and folded at angle back & forth so you end up with  cozy triangle. Brushed tops with butter and baked. For myself I preferred a spanakopita type filling folded in same manner. And hey the spinach can count as a lucky green ;) 

  • Like 4
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, David Ross said:

This morning it's 22 outside and heavy snow that will fall into tomorrow.  So I happened to remember this Cook-Off and thought what a good day to go back and look through the thread for some ideas on making a savory filled pastry.  Right now I'm thinking empanadas based on what we discussed here, but this time doing them with crab.  I may serve it with my roasted tomatillo salsa.  I think these will be delicious in a warm home on New Years Eve and Day.  And with the convenience of grocery delivery, I won't have to venture out to a store today.  What kinds of savory filled pastries sound good to you?

 

 

Crab sounds great. Any kind of seafood sounds good: scallops, salmon, etc.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phyllo dough and Spanakopita definitely.  

 

Potato and pea filled Indian Samosas.  I rather keep them in the category of purchased rather than made.  Buy enough for two lunches, freeze them...and there they are for those kind of days...no work...just defrost and eat with tamarind sauce. 

  • Like 3

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always been partial to leftover curried vegetables as a pie filling. Basic potato, cauliflower, peas, carrots and spinach or other greens, etc baked in a double crust. Or a single top crust works for deep dish. Not too sweet dough, all butter crust. Served with chutney or pickle and cucumber raita and tart apple, sliced thin.

  • Like 5
  • Delicious 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been leaning toward spinach and feta baked in puff pastry - basically spanikopita turnovers (nod to @Darienne on that) - but I also very much like the sound of crab-filled pastry. How would one go about that, please? I have a package of puff pastry begging to be used.

  • Like 2

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/30/2020 at 7:51 AM, David Ross said:

This morning it's 22 outside and heavy snow that will fall into tomorrow.  So I happened to remember this Cook-Off and thought what a good day to go back and look through the thread for some ideas on making a savory filled pastry.  Right now I'm thinking empanadas based on what we discussed here, but this time doing them with crab.  I may serve it with my roasted tomatillo salsa.  I think these will be delicious in a warm home on New Years Eve and Day.  And with the convenience of grocery delivery, I won't have to venture out to a store today.  What kinds of savory filled pastries sound good to you?

 

Crab empanadas are not going to happen, at least right now.  The annual Dungeness Crab season probably won't happen due to many factors, Mother Nature, the annual price wars between the processors and the fishermen and women, and then this year, Covid.  Covid has impacted the canners, processors and some of the boats.  I might do crab empanadas with another type of crab in the next week if something looks fresh.  But onward to other savory filled pastries.

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Darienne said:

Potato and pea filled Indian Samosas. 

 

Instead of potato & green peas, Vivian Howard's Deep Run Roots has a recipe for Rutabaga and Black-Eyed Pea Samosas with a Cilantro Buttermilk Sauce that I've been wanting to try.  Could be good for a New Year's project.  

I'm lacking both rutabaga and the spring roll wrappers she uses.  Obtaining both would require visits to 2 stores and that's not happening.  I can probably sub in another root and maybe use phyllo for the wrapper then bake instead of deep frying.   

Let's see what happens....

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Crab empanadas are not going to happen, at least right now.  The annual Dungeness Crab season probably won't happen due to many factors, Mot her Nature, the annual price wars between the processors and the fishermen and women, and then this year, Covid.  Covid has impacted the canners, processors and some of the boats.  I might do crab empanadas with another type of crab in the next week if something looks fresh.  But onward to other savory filled pastries.

 

Yup like every food processing industry. Would make me "crabby". A nice fat King Crab leg or 2 would yield nice firm flesh and is generally on sale for holiday feasting. The pricing well that is ongoing I think.

 

I was reminded of two simple fillings  When my sister the cheese nut (nicknamed Weisse Maus -white mouse as a child - had white blond hair) saw me do the phyllo triangles she grabbed some Brie from fridge, dolloped with leftover cranberry and folded it up to bake. Tasty snack. Heathen Heidi has used tuna salad as a filling. Just generic water pack. A few peas for a pop or craisins for sweet texture contrast are usually in my mix. 

Edited by heidih (log)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/30/2020 at 2:03 PM, Katie Meadow said:

I've always been partial to leftover curried vegetables as a pie filling. Basic potato, cauliflower, peas, carrots and spinach or other greens, etc baked in a double crust. Or a single top crust works for deep dish. Not too sweet dough, all butter crust. Served with chutney or pickle and cucumber raita and tart apple, sliced thin.

i made a curried turkey pie for lunch yesterday with some rando bowl of curry sauce i found in the fridge from last month. made it into a gravy with some flour and turkey stock, and chopped up the last of the turkey legs from christmas (incidentally this turkey was so good i've ordered two more from the farm and plan on keeping them in the freezer for a while). 

 

i was in the mood to make a pastry since i've had a bowl of grated butter sitting in the freezer for a month, now, and i wanted the bowl back. quick 3-2-1 dough, folded a few times, rolled out a turned into a free-form tart on a sheet. such a great way to use up leftovers.

 

26 minutes ago, MetsFan5 said:

I also have puff pastry that should be used. Can I use it to make. Beef Wellington? With a mushroom duxelle (I will need advice)? 

 

of course?

 

there are a few threads on this that might be of interest:

 

 

 

Edited by jimb0 (log)
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

I also have puff pastry that should be used. Can I use it to make. Beef Wellington? With a mushroom duxelle (I will need advice)? 

Yes, I've done that.  But the thing I do is either use slices of prosciutto or thin crepes as a barrier between the puff pastry and the mushroom duxelle.  That helps keep the moisture from getting into the pastry so the inside isn't soggy  It's a technique I saw on a Gordon Ramsey video. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

At Xmas 2019, I made four Beef Wellingtons for family dinner at our daughters.  She has a double oven so it worked perfectly. As before, we made it without any bacon, prosciutto . Just made sure the duxelle was not watery.

 

                                                                                            603726558_9BeefWellington0288.jpg.91c34638d5fcca082c8b87a3ad71faa7.jpg

No such gathering this year due to Covid-19  Level Red in Manitoba, so it was Wellington for two.

 

 

                                                                                            585230879_BeefWellingtonforTwo!2908.jpg.d28e21d614b454925e372e550157d56b.jpg

 

 

Due to various health issues - extreme acid reflux on my part, which took me to ER because of previous cardiomyopathy episodes, and hubby's ongoing "Saga of Rolling Stones" - Kidney stones, that is, I didn't get to make these Moroccan Spiced Beef Cigars until today. I usually have dozens of these made up and frozen for parties in the past, but there was no need nor the rush to make them this year. But I have been thinking about them, so I made them this afternoon. There is a yogurt-based dip that came with the original recipe, but we like them with salsa.

 

                                                                                             120663175_MoroccanSpicedBeefCigars2941.jpg.bc951de3a7d9d96c23703f0f26dcd7ca.jpg

 

 

  • Like 8
  • Delicious 2

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Dejah said:

I didn't get to make these Moroccan Spiced Beef Cigars until today. I usually have dozens of these made up and frozen for parties in the past, but there was no need nor the rush to make them this year. But I have been thinking about them, so I made them this afternoon. There is a yogurt-based dip that came with the original recipe, but we like them with salsa.

 

                                                                                             120663175_MoroccanSpicedBeefCigars2941.jpg.bc951de3a7d9d96c23703f0f26dcd7ca.jpg

 

 

 

 

I would love more information on these, since I can’t just reach over and snag a couple... they look so tasty 😋 

  • Like 1

"There are no mistakes in bread baking, only more bread crumbs"

*Bernard Clayton, Jr.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, BetD said:

 

 

I would love more information on these, since I can’t just reach over and snag a couple... they look so tasty 😋 

Not sure about posting recipes on the forum so I've sent it to you via message

 

  • Like 1

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Dejah said:

There is a yogurt-based dip that came with the original recipe, but we like them with salsa.

 

They look great. Try them with a sauce of tahini with lemon, and maybe some tomatoes. Being vegetarian I haven't had one in years, but that's the popular way to help them around here.

~ Shai N.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...
On 6/28/2011 at 8:25 PM, Kerry Beal said:

I have a hankering to make Jamaican patties.

Whien I was in Jamaica we found a patty shop early in our two week stay. We went back the next day and bought 36 of them for the four of us for rest of our stay.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Wait. Wot said:

Whien I was in Jamaica we found a patty shop early in our two week stay. We went back the next day and bought 36 of them for the four of us for rest of our stay.

I lost my connection These used annatto so eating in car resulted in Cheetos looking fingers. Such a comfort food to me. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I'm getting ready to do some huckleberry empanadas this week.  I looked over my post up-thread regarding the 3 types of dough I originally tried and found my pastry-pie crust dough worked best.  But now I wonder, do you deep-fry or bake your empanadas?  Do you prefer the text and flavor of the fried empanada pastry?  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, heidih said:

With a sweet berry filling I personally prefer fried. Gives me more of a contrast.

Thanks that's where I am leaning and I think the baked empanada dough sometimes tastes heavy, at least mine do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      This cook-off focuses on felafel. I've enjoyed fine felafel here in the US and overseas, but I have literally no idea how to make this, the national street food of at least a handful of Middle Eastern countries. Several people who have recommended this cook-off did so because, while they felt they had some clues, they didn't really have a consistently successful recipe or method. Sounds like a good cook-off topic, eh?
      There are a few topics on the felafel matter, including this one on tips and tricks, an older topic that finds more woes than techniques, and this preparation topic, How Do You Like Your Falafel? I also found this recipe by Joan Nathan, which seems like it might be useful.
      But what do I know? Not much, I'll tell you. Time to chime in, you!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...