• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

emmanuelkelvin

Wine in pasta sauce

26 posts in this topic

I was making my own homemade tomatoes - based sauce for spaghetti but i used JACOB'S CREEK - CHARDONNAY for tomato sauce.. i wonder any suggestion for any white wine such as SEMILLON CHARDONNAY etc..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wine in tomato sauce is not very Italian and these two wines are in the French style, but have you considered Soave, a wonderful Italian wine?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Soave? I am not sure about Italian wine.. i know none about that except French Wine although my knowledge of wine is not really professional but some Italian restaurant using french wine for pasta? Someday i will consider soave.. guess must be expensive..??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Soave doesn't have to be expensive; you can find it for $9.99 just like many other popular wines. It was highly popular some years ago and somewhat of trend like something like Malbec is now. It can have good acidity and be pleasantly fruity as well. It is well worth trying as an entry point into Italian wines which can be very economical. Many of them are also made to be drunk with and used in food too, so that's another reason to give them a shot.

I'm not really sure what you're looking for here, but when people use wine in food they are typically looking to add a little complexity and give the food a boost from the wine's acidity. Typically Chardonnay's like those you seem to be using are mellowed out considerably by the way they are aged, so you will have less of the acidity. These wines also tend to be a bit rich, which might not suit your purposes either. Or maybe it does: only you can be the judge and you can only find out what you like by trying things like you're doing.

It would be helpful to know what kind of sauce we're talking about here too. I tend to use wine when I'm making a fish/shellfish sauce. Otherwise, there's generally no wine in my tomato based sauces. But if you like it, go for it. That said, I'd really recommend you try something with good acidity for your sauce. And that typically means looking to France or Italy: there are many excellent values in wine and you don't have to spend a lot of money to get something that's really good. You might have to shop around and do some taste testing though (try to find some free wine tastings in your area).

When I cook an Italian pasta sauce, I typically try to use an Italian wine. So look for a Soave with good acid, or something with Sauvignon blanc in it. An Orvieto can be quite nice as well. Some Italian wines can be a bit subtle, but might still work, like Pinot Grigio. There are many others to try too. Have fun with it!


nunc est bibendum...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wine does and can appear in a pasta sauce. Try using a Chianti or a pinot grigio. Doesn't have to be expensive ... in fact, most of the wines I use cost under $15 a bottle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use wine ( a little bit reduced ) in pasta all the time. white or red depending. If im adding bacon, then maybe towards red.

for me it matters that it be dry and not have off-tastes. If I like drinking it, then Ill cook with it.

Trader Joe has a Chardonnay from Chile thats only 3.99 in the east might be 2.99 on the west.

its dry, has no off tastes and is great in the summer """chilled""" its not a complicated wine, but tastes better than TJ's Pinot Grigio at 9.99

the rest of TJ's Chile selection disappoints. still its 3.99!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a heavy tomato based sauce I pretty much always use a small amount of red wine to deglaze the fried onions and garlic.

Just make sure you cook it off so you are not left with a wine taste. Interestingly, in sauces with Bacon I use white wine, but I guess that comes down to personal preference.

Anchovies are a must for me in tomato based sauce....Red wine, anchovies both help make a great base flavour.

Luke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Soave doesn't have to be expensive; you can find it for $9.99 just like many other popular wines. It was highly popular some years ago and somewhat of trend like something like Malbec is now. It can have good acidity and be pleasantly fruity as well. It is well worth trying as an entry point into Italian wines which can be very economical. Many of them are also made to be drunk with and used in food too, so that's another reason to give them a shot.

I'm not really sure what you're looking for here, but when people use wine in food they are typically looking to add a little complexity and give the food a boost from the wine's acidity. Typically Chardonnay's like those you seem to be using are mellowed out considerably by the way they are aged, so you will have less of the acidity. These wines also tend to be a bit rich, which might not suit your purposes either. Or maybe it does: only you can be the judge and you can only find out what you like by trying things like you're doing.

It would be helpful to know what kind of sauce we're talking about here too. I tend to use wine when I'm making a fish/shellfish sauce. Otherwise, there's generally no wine in my tomato based sauces. But if you like it, go for it. That said, I'd really recommend you try something with good acidity for your sauce. And that typically means looking to France or Italy: there are many excellent values in wine and you don't have to spend a lot of money to get something that's really good. You might have to shop around and do some taste testing though (try to find some free wine tastings in your area).

When I cook an Italian pasta sauce, I typically try to use an Italian wine. So look for a Soave with good acid, or something with Sauvignon blanc in it. An Orvieto can be quite nice as well. Some Italian wines can be a bit subtle, but might still work, like Pinot Grigio. There are many others to try too. Have fun with it!

i agreed with you somehow..no harm to try new wine for tomato-based sauce..i don't think i can buy good italian wine in my area but even wine shop selling good wine..once a while i should spend good stuff to create good tomato based or cream based as well too.. maybe i should take a risk to try soave..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wine does and can appear in a pasta sauce. Try using a Chianti or a pinot grigio. Doesn't have to be expensive ... in fact, most of the wines I use cost under $15 a bottle.

I see..maybe depend on prices on your country..unlike me.. even cheap and inexpensive such as JACOB'S CREEK - CHARDONNAY costs $20 - $25 a bottle.. >.> no harm to try other wine too.. i have to think twice before buying...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a heavy tomato based sauce I pretty much always use a small amount of red wine to deglaze the fried onions and garlic.

Just make sure you cook it off so you are not left with a wine taste. Interestingly, in sauces with Bacon I use white wine, but I guess that comes down to personal preference.

Anchovies are a must for me in tomato based sauce....Red wine, anchovies both help make a great base flavour.

Luke

I never thought of using anchovies.. but i can tell it will give tomoto-based a mild flavour too.. sometime i used chicken stock for it..i never use red wine in my tomato based...deglaze fried onion and garlic is good.. but somehow not many chef doing that right.. ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think cooking with even a $20/bottle of wine is like making margaritas with $200/bottle tequila. Sure, you can do it. But I think it's a total waste. Cooking will destroy the subtle flavors that make a good wine good.

I can't stand the advice to "cook with the wine you're going to serve with the meal." That's great, but I'm serving a limited release Napa cab that I bought from the vintner. I only have two bottles of it. Do these people really think I'm going to open a THAT wine and pour half of it into a short-rib braise? Besides, the tannic cab is simply the wrong wine for that application. Once it's reduced, it will make the flavors muddy.

I cook with Two Buck Chuck. I like the merlot for red sauces and braises. It's cheap, cheerful, and doesn't have a lot of tannins so I can simmer it for hours.

I use the TBC Pinot Grigio for all manner of cooking applications.


Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think cooking with even a $20/bottle of wine is like making margaritas with $200/bottle tequila. Sure, you can do it. But I think it's a total waste. Cooking will destroy the subtle flavors that make a good wine good.

I can't stand the advice to "cook with the wine you're going to serve with the meal." That's great, but I'm serving a limited release Napa cab that I bought from the vintner. I only have two bottles of it. Do these people really think I'm going to open a THAT wine and pour half of it into a short-rib braise? Besides, the tannic cab is simply the wrong wine for that application. Once it's reduced, it will make the flavors muddy.

I cook with Two Buck Chuck. I like the merlot for red sauces and braises. It's cheap, cheerful, and doesn't have a lot of tannins so I can simmer it for hours.

I use the TBC Pinot Grigio for all manner of cooking applications.

That reasons why i have to think twice before buying good wine or else i definitely run their flavor in my tomato-based.. is like no difference from adding chicken stock..French Red Wine any of them sure go well with meat or poultry..

Look like most chef using pinot grigo.. but as long it tastes good itailan pasta.. haha.. im not sure which wine i have to settle or commit with one wine for life.. >.> hopefully i can make good pasta ..^^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow it looks like you'll have a tough time trying a variety of wines with those prices! How about a good dry vermouth? Perhaps that might be more available in your area, and I think it does a pretty good job adding a bit of complexity to dishes, especially with fish/shellfish tomato sauces. And it lasts longer too.

As for using the same wine you're going to drink with dinner, clearly you're going to have to use your judgment with that. I don't think people who advocate that are talking about using more precious wines in sauces, though there are dishes like Brasato al Barolo that specifically call for expensive wine. I just use a nebbiolo from Langhe in them, which I do also drink with the dish and it works well. There really is something to say for using good wine in cooking, but good wine doesn't have to be expensive: you can get pretty good stuff for $9.99 where I live.


nunc est bibendum...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow it looks like you'll have a tough time trying a variety of wines with those prices! How about a good dry vermouth? Perhaps that might be more available in your area, and I think it does a pretty good job adding a bit of complexity to dishes, especially with fish/shellfish tomato sauces. And it lasts longer too.

As for using the same wine you're going to drink with dinner, clearly you're going to have to use your judgment with that. I don't think people who advocate that are talking about using more precious wines in sauces, though there are dishes like Brasato al Barolo that specifically call for expensive wine. I just use a nebbiolo from Langhe in them, which I do also drink with the dish and it works well. There really is something to say for using good wine in cooking, but good wine doesn't have to be expensive: you can get pretty good stuff for $9.99 where I live.

You can say so..it's something about own chef wants to create good delicious food for guests,just like buying gold or diamond for safekeeping..HAha..Brasato al Barolo is very risky dish to cook due of experiencing..some day will make it if i have cash in my pockets or else.. i dont want to burn my a month's salary for it.. HAHA.. By the way? what about cream - based sauce? I used unsalted butter and some handful of herbs and some good italian wine too.. guess.. its same thing like tomatoes-based sauce..sometime i eat it with spaghetti.. finds it hard to swallow due to thicken cream..i make it light and easy to eat by adding egg yolk..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in NYC.

A $10 bottle of pinot grigio is pretty cheap.

I could use "cooking wine" that goes for $3 at my local supermarket but it won't be any good. YMMV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

$10 bottle of pinot grigo ? 330ml or 500ml? I live in Singapore.. it costs about $6 to $8 for 330ml >.> abit steep price..LOL.. never mind.. as long we can do experiment on wine in pasta .. ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's pretty expensive. How much for sweet vermouth? A somewhat acceptable substitute in my book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in NYC.

A $10 bottle of pinot grigio is pretty cheap.

At those prices it would be worth it to make a road trip to New Hampshire every few months and buy wine from one of the state liquor stores.

Here in Vegas, I can get a decent pinot grigio for $4 and a pretty good one for $10. Even with those prices, I'll make the trip to Napa once in awhile to load up for 25% less.


Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's pretty expensive. How much for sweet vermouth? A somewhat acceptable substitute in my book.

you using sweet vermouth for pasta? or for any meat or poultry with it? ya.. pretty expensive.. unless i travel in NYC or somewhere..given a good and better price and wine too..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The next time I buy a bottle, I'll take a photo and y'all can see just how much you get.

Price is subjective, as is taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The next time I buy a bottle, I'll take a photo and y'all can see just how much you get.

Price is subjective, as is taste.

Thanks..I am looking forward for it.. ^^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a tomato based sauce I generally prefer dry white wine (with a bit of oak) rather than red, a splash of fish sauce doesn't go a miss either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I'm a fan of Biba Caggiono, I usually use dry Marsala in a tomato based sauce as she recommends in many of her recipes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wine in tomato sauce is not very Italian and these two wines are in the French style, but have you considered Soave, a wonderful Italian wine?

Wine appears in many recipes for tomato sauce.

One example is Marcella Hazan's recipe for bolognese in "Essentials", pages 203-205.

I'm pretty sure Artusi's has recipes for tomato sauce that contain wine, but will have to check when I get home.

Just sayin'.  :wink:

 

BTW I never did get around to posting that pic I mentioned above.  Maybe this weekend I will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By JohnT
      I am led to believe that World Pasta Day 2016 is to be on Tuesday, October 25 this year. So, with this in mind, what are the eG cooks planning on "cooking up" in celebrating the day?
       
      I will start the ball rolling.
       
      I am going to make my standard egg yoke pasta sheets, rolled out on my now seldom-used manual pasta machine and use them in making lasagna, using my old and reliable bolognese sauce recipe layered with béchamel sauce and a sprinkle of grated Parmesan.
       
      And with the left-over egg whites I will make a few meringue bases for portioned pavlova - Spring is here in the Southern Hemisphere and berries and fruit are starting to appear in the shops!
    • By DianaB
      Just found out that a member of eGullet, @Cia has begun to post his short videos on Italian culinary culture on YouTube.  Only one to date but I know there are more in the pipeline.  While made by an Italian based in Italy the narrative is in English.
       
      Here's the first instalment: 
       
       
       
    • By shain
      Makes 40 cookies, 2 loaves. 
       
      50-60 g very aromatic olive oil
      80 g honey 
      120 to 150 g sugar (I use 120 because I like it only gently sweet) 
      2 eggs
      2 teaspoons of fine lemon zest, from apx 1 lemon 
      230 g flour 
      1 teaspoon salt 
      1 teaspoon baking powder 
      75 g lightly toasted peeled pistachios
      50 g lightly toasted almonds (you can replace some with pine nuts) 
      Optional: a little rosemary or anise seed
      Optional: more olive oil for brushing
       
      Heat oven to 170 deg C.
      In mixer (or by hand), mix oil, honey, sugar, lemon, egg and if desired, the optional spices - until uniform. 
      Separately mix together the flour, salt and baking powder. 
      Add flour mixture to mixer bowel with liquids and fold until uniform. Dough will be sticky and quite stiff. Don't knead or over mix. 
      Add nuts and fold until well dispersed. 
      On a parchment lined baking tray, create two even loaves of dough. 
      With moist hands, shape each to be rectangular and somewhat flat - apx 2cm heigh, 6cm wide and 25cm long. 
      Bake 25 to 30 minutes until golden and baked throughout, yet somewhat soft and sliceable. Rotate pan if needed for even baking. 
      Remove from tray and let chill slightly or completely. 
      Using a sharp serrated knife, gently slice to thin 1/2 cm thick cookies. Each loaf should yield 20 slices. 
      Lay slices on tray and bake for 10 minutes. Flip and bake for another 10-15 minutes until complelty dry and lightly golden. 
      Brush with extra olive oil, if desired. This will and more olive flavor. 
      Let chill completely before removing from tray. 
      Cookies keep well in a closed container and are best served with desert wines or herbal tea. 
       
        
    • By JoNorvelleWalker
      Steve Sando had a nice write up in the Times:
       
      http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/06/dining/marcella-hazan-rancho-gordo-beans.html?ref=dining
       
       
      According to FedEx tracking my Marcella beans (and others) are due to arrive tomorrow.
    • By Suzi Edwards
      i made some pesto on saturday and was wondering how long people would keep it for in the fridge. my partner is happy to scrape mould off stuff (bleurgh) and he says it will keep until saturday. i don't believe him...
      any ideas?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.