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minas6907

What would you call this cookie?

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Heres a video I found on youtube. What would you call this cookie? I'm not so much interested in the final product, but more so in the thin moldable cookie that looks like it spreads out like crazy in the oven. This kind of reminds me of a wafer type cookie we I would make sometimes as a garnish when I was in a restaurant. Anyone know the proper name of the dough that is being made here? Would this be a florentine?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZuBL3jPBEk

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Is there any other name? The reason I'm a bit confused is that I see no reference to a 'snap cookie' (except ginger snaps) in any of my text books. I think the name is throwing me off. Even my Food Lovers Companion had no reference to anything called a snap. It almost looks like a florentine with out the candied fruit/nuts. Anywho, thanks for the fast response.

Edited to say that I posted the above before seeing Kerry's post. She posted while I was typing this out.


Edited by minas6907 (log)

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I'd call it a lace cookie. At my first restaurant job we would make something like that, form it over cups into bowl shapes, then fill with sorbet or fruit and cream or whatever, like lace baskets with lemon mousse and strawberries. They need a minute to cool before they are solid enough to shape, but then you have to work quickly. You can put them back in the oven to soften if they get too brittle.


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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I 3rd Brandy snaps. They are great draped over a small bowl when just out of the oven, to form wee bowls and fill as you wish. Gorgeous things. BTW..brandy plays no part in their making. :smile:

ETA: I see someone else had mentioned the draping, and the included recipe above has brandy in the cream. Aussies always tinker with Kiwi recipes. :wink:

Good blog on Brandy Snaps w/recipe


Edited by Sentiamo (log)

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I'll 4th Brandy Snaps. I've never seen them baked rolled up, though - all of my recipes for them (Scottish traditionals) call for them to be baked flat and rolled around the handle of a wooden spoon or into formed into tart cups while still quite warm and pliable.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Wow, ok, Brandy Snaps it is! I was confused by the title of the video, I did a google image search for 'snaps' and pretty much just got lots of ginger snaps. A search of 'brandy snaps' got what I was looking for. Thanks everyone!

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The name is confusing because these cookies are not like gingersnaps.

The Brandy Snaps in the Fanny Farmer Baking Book are filled with brandy-flavored whipped cream. The basic cookie, however, is a tuile--butter, corn syrup, sugar, flour. Here:

http://books.google.com/books?id=oioeRpagr_kC&pg=PA619&lpg=PA619&dq=fannie+farmer+baking+book+brandy+snaps&source=bl&ots=nR-aqJJ3VW&sig=g644AKwp6iTLQ2p3mT2PK6C7kX8&hl=en&ei=vh0ATv6QIJi4tQPA182qDw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CCwQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

I've seen the term lace cookie used interchangeably with tuile all over the place. The Fanny Farmer Baking Book presents a kind of oatmeal cookie as a "lace cookie." (See the recipe above the Brandy Snaps.) That's not typical. Though those oatmeal cookies are fantastic--I ate them once at a party.

Florentines seem to be a heavier deal, with butter, sugar, honey, cream, flour, & chopped nuts & citrus peel.

Compare the entries for "tuile" and "florentine" in Food Lover's Companion.

If you're looking for a moldable cookie recipe, check out David Lebovitz's tuiles as cookie cups here (keep scrolling):

http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2006/11/baking-class-on/

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Antipodeans call your Gingersnaps.. Gingernuts. :smile:

Brandy Snaps are an English invention according to wikipedia and if you really want them to be authentic, dont use molasses or corn syrup, you REALLY do need golden syrup. I know you can buy Tate and Lyle GS in the States and if a shop does not stock it, it is online as I have steered many American friends in that direction.

A tin of that syrup in your cupboard will make many delights other than brandy snaps. Steamed GS pudding or dumplings, a gorgeous caramel sauce, Anzac Biscuits, and the delectable Ginger Crunch.

I have digressed sorry. :wink:

ETA: Golden Syrup recipes


Edited by Sentiamo (log)

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I would call them tuiles. I have also decided to try to make them in the next couple of days seeing as I have some whipping cream on hand.

As for the video. Clearer than clear...to the point of 'get on with it!!!!'. Also I am curious why the French was smaller than the English. Obviously not done in France or Quebec.

DH does not like ginger except in Chinese food so I might halve it or just leave it out.

Thanks for posting it.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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