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Leaving a "Root" When Brewing Chinese Green Teas?


Richard Kilgore
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Jing and Sebastian at jingteashop.com recommend leaving a small amount of tea in your gaiwan as a "root" for the next infusion when brewing Chinese green tea. Anyone else do this? I have tried it, but not done a side-by-side comparison, and think there may be a mild intensification of flavor. It certainly does not seem to cause any bitterness.

How about leaving a root in a glass when brewing "gradpa style"?

Thoughts? Experiences?

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How about leaving a root in a glass when brewing "gradpa style"?

That's a different matter, as that's one of the distinguishing characteristics of brewing grandpa style.

Edited by Will (log)
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  • 3 years later...

Hello- I always leave a root when I use a gaiwan. I do so whether I brew a black/red tea, a green tea or an oolong. I do not bother measuring:) I  just pout it into another cup to drink it (I just use the gaiwan to brew it) :shock:   I just make sure the cup is not big enough to empty the gaiwan.

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Well, I frequently leave the residues (plus some residual brewed tea) in my teapot, add some more fresh tea leaves if needed or desired, and pour in more hot water.  Does that count? This could go on for several days, in fact.

 

I don't often use the gaiwans I have (蓋碗; Jyutping Cantonese: goi3 wun2; literally, "covered bowls") which are antiques.  Perhaps I'll post some pictures in the thread on tea paraphernalia I've discovered here on eG.

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Well, I frequently leave the residues (plus some residual brewed tea) in my teapot, add some more fresh tea leaves if needed or desired, and pour in more hot water.  Does that count? This could go on for several days, in fact.

 

I don't often use the gaiwans I have (蓋碗; Jyutping Cantonese: goi3 wun2; literally, "covered bowls") which are antiques.  Perhaps I'll post some pictures in the thread on tea paraphernalia I've discovered here on eG.

huiray- Yes, Imo refilling a pot in the manner you described  would count.

 

Thanks for the info. I think I will make a point to use goi3 wun2 when writing about my "covered bowls". I could write it as goi3 wun2(gaiwan). And, please post pictures of your antiques.

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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