Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: bmdaniel (2011) - Going off the diet in Dallas and Chicag


bmdaniel
 Share

Recommended Posts

Kind of last minute, but any recommendations on garlic bread technique? I was thinking about roasting some garlic in the oven, making a compound butter with it, then topping toasted bread with it - any better ideas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's obviously a ton we didn't capture, but hopefully this gives you a feel for it. We got a hodgepodge of different stuff - it'll pop up throughout the next few days.

It gives a really good feel for it. I've often heard good things about Central Market, but I've never been or seen pictures. It makes me very envious.

Kind of last minute, but any recommendations on garlic bread technique? I was thinking about roasting some garlic in the oven, making a compound butter with it, then topping toasted bread with it - any better ideas?

I realize that it's probably way too late, but if feeding a group, I slice a loaf of bread in half lengthwise then shmear one of the cut sides with a mixture of butter (salt), lots of fresh garlic and herbs if desired. Put the two halves together again, then slice the whole thing into slices (1 1/2-2" inch slices maybe?) making sure not to cut right through the bottom. Wrap the whole thing in foil and bake at 375 til toasty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great stuff, cant wait to see more. I went once to the Central Market in Houston. Wow! what a place. Having access to it compensates for having to live in Houston I'm told.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My breakfast this morning:

coffee.jpg

Open to suggestions on the art - maybe an alligator grabbing a ball (you have to turn your head a little)?

Dinner was a qualified success - everything came out really well except the star attraction, the short ribs. I've made SV short ribs several times before and they've always been great, but last night's just tasted dry and overcooked (they were edible with plenty of the sauce, but barely). They weren't very pink either (did them at 140F), I'm wondering if there was a temp issue? I checked the bath with two different thermometers, everything agreed so very odd. Any ideas?

Tonight's dinner includes 60 hour lamb shanks at the same temp, so it will be interesting to see how they come out (more on this in a bit).

Pictures from last night forthcoming.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plan for tonight's dinner is modernist Indian -

Making the Mughal Curry lamb shanks from Modernist Cuisine, with cashew halvah. Lamb shanks went into the bath saturday morning (hopefully they don't meet the same fate as the short ribs). Sauce is fairly straightforward, will pull that together after work tonight, and cashew halvah is just a matter of blending roasted cashews with tapioca maltodextrin, so hopefully pretty easy (I've never used maltodextrin so it will be interesting).

For other sides, was planning on jasmine rice, a Madhur Jeffrey onion and garlic crusted potato recipe, and parathas. I could use some help on the parathas - MC suggested a shortcut version made out of two pieces of puff pastry pressed together and fried. Has anyone tried anything like that (I bought the puff pastry yesterday, so I am committed, but could use some advice)?

Also planning on making some tiki classics tonight - need to finish up the orgeat (was supposed to do yesterday, but dinner and baby intervened, so the ground almonds are getting an extra long infusion) and make a very small batch of cinnamon syrup.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I realize that it's probably way too late, but if feeding a group, I slice a loaf of bread in half lengthwise then shmear one of the cut sides with a mixture of butter (salt), lots of fresh garlic and herbs if desired. Put the two halves together again, then slice the whole thing into slices (1 1/2-2" inch slices maybe?) making sure not to cut right through the bottom. Wrap the whole thing in foil and bake at 375 til toasty.

Ended up trying the roasted garlic compound butter - spread it on thick slices of lightly pre-toasted sourdough and then gave another quick trip to the oven- came out very well. Should have made more!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great stuff, cant wait to see more. I went once to the Central Market in Houston. Wow! what a place. Having access to it compensates for having to live in Houston I'm told.

I would echo that but for Dallas. I actually grew up in Houston, and moved back there after college - just came to Dallas 3 years ago for a job. Not wild about Dallas overall, but it would be a lot worse if there wasn't a Central Market! It's to the point now that when we think about buying a house here, proximity to CM is a major criteria.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last night's dinner pictures - apologize that things got a little crazy and so not a ton of prep photos.

IMGP0985 (640x425).jpg

Boston Club Punch - This was a big hit!

IMGP0997 (640x425).jpg

Caprese salad - simple but great ingredients made a great starter

IMGP1003 (640x425).jpg

Ad Hoc Stroganoff with sauteed porcini and morel - sadly without short ribs

IMGP0991 (640x425).jpg

IMGP1010 (640x425).jpg

Nicole's blueberry, peach, ginger cobbler pre- and post- bake; delicious with Haagen Daz 5 Vanilla

Didn't get a pic of the garlic bread (but nothing too exciting to look at anyways). Nicole wants me to disclaim again that I ended up taking these pictures, explaining their substandard quality.

Off to lunch soon - hoping to join Nicole and Charlie for hamburgers, but work may interfere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I realize that it's probably way too late, but if feeding a group, I slice a loaf of bread in half lengthwise then shmear one of the cut sides with a mixture of butter (salt), lots of fresh garlic and herbs if desired. Put the two halves together again, then slice the whole thing into slices (1 1/2-2" inch slices maybe?) making sure not to cut right through the bottom. Wrap the whole thing in foil and bake at 375 til toasty.

Ended up trying the roasted garlic compound butter - spread it on thick slices of lightly pre-toasted sourdough and then gave another quick trip to the oven- came out very well. Should have made more!

As far as I'm concerned, that phrase 'shoulda made more' ought to be inherent in the recipe title; "Shoulda made more Garlic Bread", no matter WHAT the recipe is made from! I mean, garlic, butter, herbs and good bread; what's not to love? :wink:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lunch today at Commissary, a fairly new restaurant from John Tesar (who made his name at the Mansion, one of Dallas's best restaurants, and subsequently has had a number of false starts - here's a blog post with a bit of background: http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/cityofate/2010/08/tesar.php). The focus on burgers but at night have a number of dinner specials (which you can maybe read on the board if you squint, but probably not). They also have a separate restaurant within a restaurant "The Table", which is a prix-fixe communal tasting dinner, complete with canapes, cheese cart, candy cart, etc.

1000001060 (542x640).jpg

1000001051 (640x442).jpg

1000001053 (640x478).jpg

We had chips, guacamole, and salsa to start - nothing earth shattering, but the chips were freshly fried (didn't get a picture until it was mostly gone):

1000001050 (640x325).jpg

I had "The Rib", a short rib sandwich with collard greens and horesradish mayo - this was the best thing I tried (fries could have been a bit crispier though).

1000001055 (443x495).jpg

Nicole had pork belly sliders - these had some kind of apricot jam on them. The pork belly was good, but the whole thing was a little too sweet/rich.

1000001054 (505x599).jpg

Didn't try these, but co-workers had a tandoori burger (lamb patty with tzatkiki in a pita) and a bacon cheeseburger

1000001057 (628x434).jpg

1000001058 (534x332).jpg

Also split some tempura avocado with a spicy mayo which was pretty well done

1000001056 (399x533).jpg

All in all, good but not great lunch.

Edited by bmdaniel (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quick morning update - dinner went well, pictures forthcoming. Interestingly the 60hr lamb shanks (done for the most part alongside the short ribs) were amazing, so the short rib mystery is even stranger. I took pictures detailing my whole coffee process this morning, so you'll have to wait on those to see my rorshach today (I couldn't come up with anything, so I'm going to need some help).

Bad storms here in Dallas early this morning - couldn't get back to sleep so I did some prep for dinner. Plan is modernist pea and carrot risotto (I'm trying their pressure cooked approach) - need to figure out sides; what's left is potatoes (was going to make an Indian potato dish but ran out of steam), that yellow summer squash, and cucumber (Plus I have some mint and parsley, leftover cashew "halvah", and I think some of the mughal curry sauce). Potato + risotto is pretty starchy, but I'd hate to waste them (we have dinner out tomorrow night at one of our favorite places) - any ideas (not a big deal to run by the store and grab something as necessary)?

Since I'm up, I thought I'd go out for breakfast tacos this morning - hopefully I can convince Nikki and Charles to wake up and join me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Breakfast this morning was at Good 2 Go Taco - they serve non-traditional breakfast and lunch tacos. Good 2 Go first opened in a eco-friendly gas station in Dallas and fairly recently moved into their own location. They share the building with Cultivar Coffee, a local roaster who just opened their first retail store/coffee bar.

1000001063.JPG

1000001064.JPG

Cultivar Coffee

1000001065.JPG

Bottled drinks

1000001066.JPG

Menu - today they had 7 suggested tacos or you can build your own. Their trademark taco is called the Paris, Texas and has steak, spinach, egg, and charred tomato hollandaise (we didn't get that today).

Nicole and I split 3 (and Charles ate a good amount of egg, ham, and chorizo) -

photo 1.JPG

Honey Bear - Honey Bacon with egg and goat cheese

photo 2.JPG

Ham I Am - Apricot glazed ham with egg and asparagus

photo 3.JPG

Hangover Cure - Smashed cheesy potatoes and chorizo

photo 4.JPG

Salsas - green especially is very good

I also had a breve cortado from Cultivar - their latte art is slightly better than mine (but less fun)

IMG-20110621-00022.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alright - got a lot of stuff coming down the pipe - coffee first.

Here's the set-up (minus the Mazzer Mini grinder I didn't want to move):

IMGP1075 (640x425).jpg

Until I can justify plopping down $2,000 on this, I am using an aeropress. I highly recommend this little device - for $25 you can make pretty high-quality "espresso". I think I mentioned before I'm brewing Klatch FTO Espresso right now; I rotate through a group of roasters usually - klatch, counter culture, stumptown, and my favorite, espresso vivace. I also like Texas roaster Cuvee Coffee, which I'll pick up if I'm almost out of coffee and I am somewhere I can get it fresh.

I don't know if this is interesting but I thought I'd demo the aeropress technique - feel free to skip!

IMGP1079 (425x640).jpg

Heat water and pre-warm cup; I have a nice little kettle from Adagio (the UtiliTEA), which lets you dial in a temperature (it just turns off when it hits it) - I shoot for 175-180.

IMGP1080 (640x425).jpg

Put together the aeropress with one of the paper filters. Pre-wet the paper filter - I can't decide if this does anything, but I've seen several sources recommend it and it's not much trouble

IMGP1081 (425x640).jpg

Grind the coffee - I send a handful of beans down first to clear out the stale coffee oils from the last batch, then use two spoonfuls of coffee (spoon comes with the aeropress) - comes out to about 23-25 grams of coffee. The aeropress has handy markings on the side that show you how much water to add based on how many scoops of coffee - I always use two for myself, but if I'm making one for someone else I do 4 and just split it in half.

IMGP1083 (425x640).jpg

Put the coffee in the aeropress, and fill with water to the right little circle - let it sit 10 seconds

IMGP1086 (425x640).jpg

Stir with the handy little stir stick for 10 seconds - the shape of it ensures that it won't hit the filter (smart!)

IMGP1089 (425x640).jpg

Let it sit another 10 seconds then plunge

IMGP1092 (425x640).jpg

For cappuccino/latte steam milk; I use a little cusiinart espresso machine that doesn't make good espresso but can steam milk fine (it'll be in the soon upcoming kitchen pictures). I like a pretty short cappuccino, just a bit more milk than coffee. For clean-up the coffee/filter puck can be ejected straight into the trash, then you just give it a rinse and you're done.

IMGP1097 (640x425).jpg

Voila! (Maybe a snail?)

Edited by bmdaniel (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see a sumo wrestler face scowling and his little top knot....

I enjoyed the run through of the aero press - I had no idea how it worked.

The breakfast tacos were really interesting. We have lots of places that do breakfast burritos but they can be just too too much if you actually plan to do anything other than take a nap. The tacos give you some interesting taste combinations and would seem to allow you to happily still function.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Matt -

Glad you asked on orgeat! I mostly just used the procedure Sam outlined here, with some minor modification due to circumstance. This probably doesn't need step-by-step pictures, but what the hell, I have them

IMGP0979 (640x425).jpg

Soak the raw, peeled almonds for an hour or so and dump in blender

IMGP0982 (640x425).jpg

Blend up - at this point you are supposed to let it sit for an hour or two, but Charles decided to go to sleep on my chest and then I had a short rib debacle, so it ended up soaking overnight in the fridge

IMGP1027 (634x640).jpg

Next day, strain through cheesecloth; wring out all the juice you can. (You can do this multiple times, reinfusing the solids each time, but I figured after a 24 hour soak, good enough).

IMGP1033 (524x640).jpg

Resulting almond juice

IMGP1036 (640x425).jpg

Combine with equal parts sugar (I used a mix of regular and demarara), heat gently until combined - cool, and you have acheived orgeat. Has a very nice, pure almond favor (I didn't add any brandy or orange flower water).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Belated pics of last night's dinner - got a few prep photos this time. Final menu ended up being lamb shanks SV at 141F for 60H, mughal curry sauce from Modernist Cuisine, cashew halvah from modernist cuisine, faux parathas, and jasmine rice.

Back to Saturday morning -

IMGP0660 (640x425).jpg

Lamb shanks from Central Market

IMGP0674 (425x640).jpg

Vacuum sealed

IMGP0675 (425x640).jpg

In the SVM to swim until Monday night

IMGP1017 (640x425).jpg

Pressure cooking on the left - raw almonds, cashews, and poppy seeds - 1 hour at 15 psi; sauteeing on the right - shallots, ginger, garlic, serrano chili (subbed for birds eye which I can never find). In the oven below are spices toasting - mace, cumin, cardamom, cinnamon, black pepper, clove (and probably something else I'm forgetting)

Off-camera - blend the nuts into paste in the blendtec; add raisins, water, and the shallot mixture and puree - season to taste with lime juice and salt.

Okay, admit I got a bit lazy here. Rest of the prep:

Cashew halvah - 100 grams of roasted unsalted cashews, 30 grams of tapioca maltodextrin, salt to taste - blend in blendtec - voila! Pretty tasty cashew powder

Parathas - Took store bought frozen puff pastry, sprinkled with sliced scallions, folded over and cooked in a pan with butter.

Shanks - Take out of bag, dry with paper towel, hit with Iwatani torch

Rice just jasmine rice on the stovetop.

Dinner shots:

IMGP1050 (640x452).jpg

Shank, sitting on sauce, sprinkled with cashew halvah - shank was excellent, highly recommend that time-temperature combo. Sauce was strange, but good - very thick and rich.

IMGP1053 (640x461).jpg

Parathas surprisingly good considering what they were - probably a little too thick, inside was pretty gooey. I would recommend this method if you want something quick and easy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tiki cocktails - went for old classics, Mai Tais pre-dinner, Zombie after.

Mai Tai Ingredients (err - plus orange curacao, plus appleton rum)

IMGP1041 (640x580).jpg

I made myself Trader Vic's traditional with Smith and Cross as the Jamaican rum:

Lime Juice

Orange Curacao

Orgeat

Simple Syrup

St. James Ambre Martinique Rum

Smith and Cross Jamaican Rum

IMGP1045 (606x640).jpg

Smith and Cross really takes over here - it's an interesting drink, but I think something less assertive is probably better (Nicole was not a fan at all).

I made Nicole a Surf Room Mai Tai:

Lime Juice

Lemon Juice

Orange Juice

Pineapple Juice

Orgeat

Simple Syrup

Lemon Hart 151 Demarara

Flor De Cana 4

This was a hit (first time I have made it) - didn't get a picture, but it looked almost identical to the above without the spent lime shells.

After dinner I made myself a Zombie, using the Aku-Aku club recipe which is new to Beachbum Berry Remixed - it has all the same ingredients as the original Zombie, but with the proportions rejiggered a bit:

Grapefruit Juice

Lime Juice

Zombie Mix (equal parts grenadine, orange curacao, falernum, pernod)

Cinnamon syrup

Angostura

Lemon Hart 151

Mount Gay Eclipse (used this as a gold Puerto Rican Style)

This was spectacular (although I wished I had a white grapefruit). Didn't get a picture unfortunately, but not really much to look at.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last post for now (whew!) - still need to figure out when I'm going to get the kitchen pics up - too much to do!

We went to Tei-An Soba House - Chef-Owner Teiichi Sakura started two very good, very succeful Japanese restaurants in Dallas (Teppo and Tei-Tei Robata Bar), but in 2007 gave them both up and went to Japan to study Soba at the Tsukiji Soba Academy. After he got back to Dallas, he opened Tei-An, obviously featuring excellent house made Soba along with a pretty wide array of other excellent Japanese items. Currently only 3 Dallas restaurants have 5 stars from the Dallas Morning News - the Mansion, Lucia, and Tei-An (I think critic Leslie Brenner has Dallas ratings in a bit of a mess, but hard to quibble at the top). We've had some spectacular dinners at Tei-An, so we were very excited to go today for lunch.

photo 4 (640x534).jpg

Tempura Sampler - shrimp, purple potato, shisito peppers, shios leaf, enoki mushroom, and one other kind of mushroom I didn't catch - very well done

photo 3 (640x478).jpg

Tempura dipping sauce, collection of flavored salts for tempura (Matcha, Truffle, and Sichuan Pepper), and 4 sauces for sushi (from left to right: spicy, olive?, ponzu, soy)

photo 5 (640x490).jpg

Miso-braised brisket - excellent

photo 1 (640x478) (2).jpg

Purple potato gnocchi with gorgonzola sauce - wasn't a fan of this - texture was gummy and taste was too sweet for me

photo 2 (640x351).jpg

Sushi sampler - Tuna, Salmon (oops, ate it before picture), Yellowtail, flathead and fatlip? Not sure on last two (in retrospect I may have been the victim of a verbal assault). Excellent quality on the fish

photo 1 (640x505).jpg

Spicy Tuna Pressed Sushi - good but nothing amazing - probably shouldn't have ordered

Curry Soba with Spicy Salmon Pressed Sushi - hearty and comforting (if perhaps inappropriate for 90+ degree dallas)

photo 2 (640x478).jpg

Waitress ladling soba into soba cup

Overall, the meal was only good, not great. It's possible we just didn't order well, but definitely wasn't a five star lunch. Still, one could do much worse.

photo 4 (640x478).jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Realized I haven't said much about Chicago - as a little tease, I'll mention that our two dinner reservations are probably two of the three toughest we've ever gotten (went to El Bulli on our honeymoon in 09).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Realized I haven't said much about Chicago - as a little tease, I'll mention that our two dinner reservations are probably two of the three toughest we've ever gotten (went to El Bulli on our honeymoon in 09).

I was wondering when you were going to mention Chicago plans.

Schwa? Next?

I think some would say Alinea, but we didn't have problems either time we went.

Looking forward to seeing you enjoy your time here.

I like cows, too. I hold buns against them. -- Bucky Cat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and lead us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
    • By shain
      It's been more than a year in which international travel was challenging to impossible, but gladly this is changing, as more countries are able to vaccinate their population.
      Greece had managed to return to a state of near normality, and opted to allow vaccinated individuals to enter. And so I decided to go on a slightly spontaneous vacation (only slightly, we still had almost a month for planning). To the trip I was joined by my father, to whom I owed some good one-on-one time and was able to travel on a short-ish notice.
       
       
      Many people are yet unable to travel, and many countries are suffering quite badly from the virus, and therefore I considered if I should wait some time with this post. However, I hope that it will instead be seen with an optimistic view, showing that back-to-normal is growing ever closer.
       
       
      We returned just a few days ago, and it will take me some time to organize my photos, so this is a teaser until then.
       
       
       
       
    • By Drew777
      I'm a Brit. I'm also a closet Frenchman.  To cap it all, I'm happily retired in Bangkok, the city of a street food culture that's second to none. The Thais are healthy and slim. I'm just this side of alive and far from slim. Lockdown has me fantasizing about my days working in London, Paris and New York, an existence, if one could call it that, revolving around gastronomy of one kind or another. They paid me, not so very much as it happens, to do what I enjoy doing most in life. We all get to do it, but I was one of a fortunate few who made it his metier. Well all that's in the past now, but I still dream of my time in Paris when lunch was a tad short of 2-hours, little-known local bistros remained affordable until the day they were discovered by La Bible (Michelin Guide) and the students were revolting - this was the summer of '68, for heaven's sake. Someone should open bistro here in Bangkok with a table d'hote of Soupe a l'Oignon gratinee, Blanquette de Veau, a stinky Epoisses and Tarte Tatin to finsih with creme fraiche. Ah, it's back to lockdown and pad Thai. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...