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eG Foodblog: pastameshugana (2011) - Looking for an Oasis in a Culinar


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What a wonderfully varied background....but oh, to be so close and not have Hatch chiles! I still swoon for the huevos rancheros I had in Santa Fe last month -- and that's not that close to Hatch, either. Anxious for the ribs update; I tend to smoke pork butt on my gas grill, but hadn't thought of the country stylel (boneless) ribs; they should work nicely, and more quickly!

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Heidi, I did get my fill while chopping! I told my wife that if you could bottle the flavor of crispy pork fat fresh off the grill, you'd make a million dollars.

I believe they call them pecan farms around here. We've got two pecan trees but it's not the right season or else I'd do something with them!

Stopping for a quick bite at a 'country' buffet called ranchers after band practice, then home to plan huevos rancheros (you inspired me!).

From iPhone using Tapatalk

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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So excited to see what culinary magic you can pull out of your hat this week! The pork looks like a pretty delicious start :wink: ...

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Well, headed off to bed, so I thought I'd share a meal that we had on the road last week.

On our way to Lubbock, TX (the 'city' in these parts), we stopped in Seminole, TX to eat. I was really craving the 'Super Pollo', which has a 12 foot chicken smoker out front, but alas, they were closed for the holiday (didn't anyone tell them holidays are for people, not restaurants?!).

Anyhoo....

We ended up at a little place called Daily Burgers:

DSC02119.JPG

DSC02118.JPG

...which as you can see by the window signs, has quite a variety of dishes.

I ordered corn dogs for the little people, which I was informed were 'hand made', which I deciphered as 'hand battered', and it's the first time in my life I've been impressed by a corn dog:

DSC02123.JPG

Is that thing beautiful, or what? The batter was so rich and buttery, and it was a quality dog inside to boot. As they would say in Bangalore: Pukka! (Which I am informed means 'of high quality or reputation' - If, in fact, I've been translation-bombed and it actually means your father smelt of elderberry, then my sincerest apologies (and there go the parentheses again)).

Then a green chili burger with everything for Mrs. Meshugana:

DSC02125.JPG

Which was wonderful except for the meat being too small for the bun.

And when I asked the employee what they were famous for, she recommended the home made Pirogies, stuffed with home made cottage cheese and grilled:

DSC02128.JPG

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I was very surprised by these, and enjoyed them enough that I would make the 30 minute drive for them alone (and cheap gas in Texas). They were served with a little piece of ham and some sort of gravy that tasted a bit like a thin, milky cheese sauce. Who knows what it was, but it was very tasty.

Sweet Dreams! (if you're in the Western Hemisphere), Good Morning! (to the Eastern) - be back in a few hours!

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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And when I asked the employee what they were famous for, she recommended the home made Pirogies, stuffed with home made cottage cheese and grilled:

DSC02128.JPG

DSC02129.JPG

I was very surprised by these, and enjoyed them enough that I would make the 30 minute drive for them alone (and cheap gas in Texas). They were served with a little piece of ham and some sort of gravy that tasted a bit like a thin, milky cheese sauce. Who knows what it was, but it was very tasty.

Sweet Dreams! (if you're in the Western Hemisphere), Good Morning! (to the Eastern) - be back in a few hours!

As someone who knows a thing or 5 about pierogies....*THAT* is a thing of beauty. I literally just sat down after finishing dinner, and I'd eat a plate of them in a heartbeat.

That corn dog looked pretty damn swell, too. But those pierogies are truly swoon-worthy.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Top of the morning.

Here's today's breakfast, inspired by kayb!

The last time I made huevos rancheros was in India, and only my second son (then almost 6) would eat them with me. He's a chili head to the core. It was almost a test of manhood for him, and he refused to have anything to drink till he was done!

Now, my 'Indian' rancheros were deadly, featuring Guntur chillies and what the markets called 'green chili' - which were a lot like serranos.

Todays was a little less intense.

Ingredients on the cutting board (I love my sani-tuff):

DSC02178.JPG

Hard stuff being sauteed:

DSC02174.JPG

Tortillas ready for the eggs:

DSC02179.JPG

Today it was me and my chili-headed second son and Mrs. Meshugana. The others aren't interested and would rather have corn flakes...

Posing for the paparazzi:

DSC02180.JPG

Ta-Da!

DSC02182.JPG

For this dish, after softening the onion, garlic and chillies (Serrano and Anaheim), I added 1/2 can of Hatch diced, plus one full can of El Pato hot tomato sauce. (This stuff is the bomb. Go right now and buy some. Heaven in a 59 cent can!) Tossed in the tomatoes and let it all stew while frying the eggs.

As I mentioned earlier, I've got a small appetite, so no sides. Don't want to waste precious stomach real estate with silly sides!

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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In my effort to shore up for this week's food blogging, we did some power shopping in Lubbock last week.

I was super-excited that we were there at the beginning of Farmer's Market 'season', June 1st. From what I read online, the city was going to be awash in fresh produce at every corner in bright colors and at fabulous prices.

The first market we visited was an empty lot. That's it. No market, just the weeds. The second one had one tired old man with (and I counted): Two crates of apples.

Hmmm...

To make a long story short, we ended up at a (chain) grocery store called Sun Harvest Farmers Market:

DSC02154.JPG

They're a regular grocer, but they source most of their produce from 'local' or 'local-ish' farmers.

Man, I don't care if they came from china, but it was the greatest produce section I'd seen in a loooong while:

IMG_0240.JPG

The prices were also amazing, compared to what we've been paying over here in 'The End of the Culinary Universe.'

They had lots of interesting, different stuff, like the bulk grains:

IMG_0249.JPG

We scored some very tasty yogurt raisins and chocolate covered cashews plus a cooler full of veggies. We also took advantage of their 'mini-carts' to train #4 in the art of produce shopping:

IMG_0242.JPG

The best thing about this store? Their the first store in the US to have 'Locally Grown Restrooms'

IMG_0251.JPG

(Thanks to my sharp-eyed 7-year old for catching that one)

We were so impressed with the store that we're going to schedule monthly visits there to stock up. How far do you guys drive for vegetables?

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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OH MY GOD HOBBS! My mother and her siblings all grew up in Hobbs, I spent my childhood summers with my grandparents there. I hear it's changed a lot in the last twenty years, what with casinos and such.

By the way, the Mexican restaurant my family always ate at was La Fiesta, and I know for a FACT they have green chile. I know they're still open, too. Recently saw an old friend of the family and she said it's exactly the same as it ever was. Way old school at this point. (Fun family fact: my parent's divorce was sparked over an argument about guacamole salad at La Fiesta.)

-Sounds awfully rich!

-It is! That's why I serve it with ice cream to cut the sweetness!

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Uh oh - I guess we'll be avoiding the guacamole salad. ;)

MissAmy - You're right in that there are places here that serve green chile. You can also buy them here (fresh in the right season), but the 'culture' of the city is so much more like Texas than the rest of New Mexico. Red asado would be much more prevalent here than good green chile stew.

And yes...Hobbs now has a casino (with a buffet!), so it's changed a bit from what I hear.

BTW - La Fiesta is a decent little place, but (at least nowadays) it's a very 'gringo' menu. Very little spice and nothing to excite you (except, I guess, the guacamole salad? Depending on your definition of excitement!).

:D

Edited by pastameshugana (log)

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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Struck out on that island - it was a battered floor-model only.

On to better things!

Here's the final result of those smoked pork ribs, on a bun:

DSC02188.JPG

I tossed the meat with some 'magic dust' from Memphis Championship BBQ, and a little bit of Stubbs BBQ sauce. This was a sandwich of glory.

Tonight was supposed to be discada, but our friends cancelled and other things came up, so maybe Thursday for that. Tomorrow I'm planning on Challa bread and Leek soup for dinner. We'll see what else happens!

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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You have a fascinating culinary heritage and I hope to see how/if they combine somehow--although very happy to see "single origin" dishes like the beautiful huevos rancheros and pork sandwiches. I laughed when you said Lubbock was the big city--a great way to communicate how REALLY rural you are. And yo certainly convinced me that you are in a food wasteland--a kind of Bermuda Triangle of ingredients (although pecans are always special). Power to you for doing this blog, and doing it so well.

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Top of the morning.

Here's today's breakfast, inspired by kayb!

The last time I made huevos rancheros was in India, and only my second son (then almost 6) would eat them with me. He's a chili head to the core. It was almost a test of manhood for him, and he refused to have anything to drink till he was done!

Now, my 'Indian' rancheros were deadly, featuring Guntur chillies and what the markets called 'green chili' - which were a lot like serranos.

Todays was a little less intense.

Ingredients on the cutting board (I love my sani-tuff):

DSC02178.JPG

Hard stuff being sauteed:

DSC02174.JPG

Tortillas ready for the eggs:

DSC02179.JPG

Today it was me and my chili-headed second son and Mrs. Meshugana. The others aren't interested and would rather have corn flakes...

Posing for the paparazzi:

DSC02180.JPG

Ta-Da!

DSC02182.JPG

For this dish, after softening the onion, garlic and chillies (Serrano and Anaheim), I added 1/2 can of Hatch diced, plus one full can of El Pato hot tomato sauce. (This stuff is the bomb. Go right now and buy some. Heaven in a 59 cent can!) Tossed in the tomatoes and let it all stew while frying the eggs.

As I mentioned earlier, I've got a small appetite, so no sides. Don't want to waste precious stomach real estate with silly sides!

YUMMMMM! Glad to have inspired it, sure wish I could have sampled!

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Ta-Da!

DSC02182.JPG

For this dish, after softening the onion, garlic and chillies (Serrano and Anaheim), I added 1/2 can of Hatch diced, plus one full can of El Pato hot tomato sauce. (This stuff is the bomb. Go right now and buy some. Heaven in a 59 cent can!) Tossed in the tomatoes and let it all stew while frying the eggs.

That looks awesome! I am so going to make it as soon as I get that El Pato sauce. Going to the store in the morning! Thanks for blogging - really enjoying it!

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robirdstx - just a tip - you'll usually find the El Pato in the tomato sauce section, not the hot sauce.

Good luck!

Thanks for the tip. I also noticed you use the hot Hatch diced green chiles vs the mild. I'll get a can of those as well. Fortunately, I live in an area with a large Hispanic population so these are products that are very easy for me to find.

Edited by robirdstx (log)
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Top of the morning.

Here's today's breakfast, inspired by kayb!

The last time I made huevos rancheros was in India, and only my second son (then almost 6) would eat them with me. He's a chili head to the core. It was almost a test of manhood for him, and he refused to have anything to drink till he was done!

Now, my 'Indian' rancheros were deadly, featuring Guntur chillies and what the markets called 'green chili' - which were a lot like serranos.

Todays was a little less intense.

Ingredients on the cutting board (I love my sani-tuff):

DSC02178.JPG

Hard stuff being sauteed:

DSC02174.JPG

Tortillas ready for the eggs:

DSC02179.JPG

Today it was me and my chili-headed second son and Mrs. Meshugana. The others aren't interested and would rather have corn flakes...

Posing for the paparazzi:

DSC02180.JPG

Ta-Da!

DSC02182.JPG

For this dish, after softening the onion, garlic and chillies (Serrano and Anaheim), I added 1/2 can of Hatch diced, plus one full can of El Pato hot tomato sauce. (This stuff is the bomb. Go right now and buy some. Heaven in a 59 cent can!) Tossed in the tomatoes and let it all stew while frying the eggs.

As I mentioned earlier, I've got a small appetite, so no sides. Don't want to waste precious stomach real estate with silly sides!

Oh this is close to the perfect breakfast for me! Love the melty cheese. *drooling*

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Tonight was supposed to be discada, but our friends cancelled and other things came up, so maybe Thursday for that. Tomorrow I'm planning on Challa bread and Leek soup for dinner. We'll see what else happens!

I am really curious to hear about and see some discada....it is a recently discovered fascination of mine. Our newly-found favorite Mexican Market, Bonito Michoacan in downtown Kansas City, Kansas is the first place I've seen it. Their version is basically the trimmings (discards/discada?) from marinated beef and pork, bacon, hot dogs and ham. It goes from scary looking back at the meat counter where you can buy it by the pound...to "if loving this is wrong I don't want to be right" when it's coming out hot in a street taco, gordita or torta at the front counter.

Curious to hear if this is in any way similar to what you'll be preparing...and if so, the different variations, etc.

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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Today's a busy day (in my other, non-cooking life), but I'll be posting as I go along. Keep your eyes open for 6-braid challa and Leek soup.

Here's a peek back at one of the treats from last week in Lubbock. A little pizza place called West Crust Pizza.

Here's a look at the decor, very 'surfer-dude' friendly, and comfortable, actually for being so pretentiously hip:IMG_0219.JPG

IMG_0221.JPG

Note the real, fresh pineapples in the baskets (barely visible in the top picture). From what I could tell everything was real and fresh.

Now, I can be a pizza purist at heart - have spent my time searching for that elegant, simple pie, and I know the beauties of a simple pizza (and there's one to show here, don't worry!). BUT. And that's a big but. There are times when it is OK, even praise-worthy to do something completely out of the ordinary and wild on a pizza crust. Sure, Grandma Fuzaro wouldn't approve of this pie, but oh! what a treat!

The special on the menu:

IMG_0231.JPG

The special on my plate: (it didn't last long)

IMG_0228.JPG

This was one of the finest 'complicated' pizzas I've eaten in memory. Everything was perfectly balanced and just exquisite.IMG_0223.JPG

Now, here is the aforementioned 'simple' or 'classic' margherita pizza on the table: (it's the bottom one)

IMG_0225.JPG

IMG_0229.JPG

In spite of being just a tad bit saucy (which softened the nice 'cracker' crust), this really was a fine piece of pizza as well. For all the culinary shenanigans that the curry pizza pulled, they still managed to do a spectacular job at a pizza my dad would be proud of (especially considering the place is in West Texas (no offense meant to our Texan brethren)).

Be back soon with more!

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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Their version is basically the trimmings (discards/discada?) from marinated beef and pork, bacon, hot dogs and ham.

From Wikipedia, the font of much knowledge:

"The dish [discada] includes a mixture of grilled meats cooked on an agricultural plow disk harrow, hence its name.

Who knew? I like Zeemanb's idea better actually. :smile:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Tonight was supposed to be discada, but our friends cancelled and other things came up, so maybe Thursday for that. Tomorrow I'm planning on Challa bread and Leek soup for dinner. We'll see what else happens!

I am really curious to hear about and see some discada....it is a recently discovered fascination of mine. Our newly-found favorite Mexican Market, Bonito Michoacan in downtown Kansas City, Kansas is the first place I've seen it. Their version is basically the trimmings (discards/discada?) from marinated beef and pork, bacon, hot dogs and ham. It goes from scary looking back at the meat counter where you can buy it by the pound...to "if loving this is wrong I don't want to be right" when it's coming out hot in a street taco, gordita or torta at the front counter.

Curious to hear if this is in any way similar to what you'll be preparing...and if so, the different variations, etc.

This is the basic idea, although I believe the name comes from the 'disco' (dee-sko) that it's cooked on. Traditional lore says it came from cooking in a beaten plow, but this is what I'm using nowadays.

The meat is something like what you mentioned, although I forgo the 'wieners' and use: Chorizo, bacon & pork cutlets, plus random spices and chiles along the way. We usually serve it outside, coming hot off the disco into fresh tortillas. I'll document the whole thing in detail tomorrow!

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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The meat is something like what you mentioned, although I forgo the 'wieners' and use: Chorizo, bacon & pork cutlets, plus random spices and chiles along the way. We usually serve it outside, coming hot off the disco into fresh tortillas. I'll document the whole thing in detail tomorrow!

Cool, great insight into the meaning...the griddle cooktop they use at our market is great, but what you're describing hits at the very heart of why I love to eat. Brings back memories of open-fire lard-cooked Navajo fry bread wrapped around cheese stuffed fresh roasted chiles in northern Arizona...while that was fantastic, I think I'd be a discada man!

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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Getting ready for tonight's dinner.

My favorite (only?) baking book (if we say cookbook, can we say bakebook?):

DSC02191.JPG

"I'm-a-kneadin-my-dough, I'm-a-kneadin-my-dough""

DSC02189.JPG

I actually made challah the first time by hand, just to say I could (and because I didn't own a stand mixer!). Back in the days I had the time I made all my pasta by hand (no mixer) because it was very relaxing. Now I buy dried... I know, I'm ashamed.

PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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