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cteavin

Soy lecithin, what to do with granules

12 posts in this topic

Let me start by saying that I live in Japan and have to import when I want to try new ingredients, so I can't just run out and by a replacement for the soy lecithin granules I received the other day.

I wanted to do some experimenting with foams and use soy lecithin in dressings, chocolates, and other favorites to see what I could come up with. The problem is that the granules aren't dissolving. I've tried powdering it but I'm still not achieving suspensions or when it does (slightly) thicken the particles aren't dissolving and the texture is gritty.. I've been looking online -- and here -- for tutorials and advise for how to work with soy lecithin, but web searching doesnt seem to be my strong suit.

Can anyone tell me the ideal temperatures when soy lecithin dissolves, or is it that it needs to be strained out?

Should I even be powdering the granules?

Can you recommend some brands or types of lecithin, soy or other?

Any suggestions on how to use soy lecithin granules as granules?

Thank you much,

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I'm interested in this as well. I purchased Texturas lecite, which is a fine powder, but as I am only a home cook I had to throw most of it away as it went rancid before I could use it all. Unlike some ingredients like Sodium Citrate lecithin can go off very quickly, since it's easy to obtain in health food shops it would be great to find out what works and what doesn't. I've got a pack of lecithin granules from holland and barret that I'm about to play with here.


Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

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I use granules to make a trans-fat-free pan-release coating for baking pans. This stuff works really well; better than shortening.

Ingredients:

2 oz lecithin granules

1 cup vegetable oil (use one with a smoke point above 400°)

Mix in a blender or food processor until smooth. Store tightly sealed in the refrigerator for up to a year. Use to grease pans.

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:laugh: I would have never thought of that! What do you use for the spray bottle?

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Hello,

I have used lecithin granules many times with no gritiness. Powder them in a coffee grinder/spice mill, add to the liquid, bring barely to a simmer and proceed. This works great for emulsions, foamy sauces, really anything you would use lecithin for. This is also convienient as the granules are available at any health food store as a dietary suppliment.

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after reading up on improving the emulsification capability of lechithin I recently tried putting it into heated oil at140Ffor 5 minutes ,then using a stick blender to break it up,and cool, before I added the rest of the stuff for vinegar and oil salad dressing,then finished up the blend with the rest of the ingredients,, and It worked really well

Bud

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after reading up on improving the emulsification capability of lechithin I recently tried putting it into heated oil at140Ffor 5 minutes ,then using a stick blender to break it up,and cool, before I added the rest of the stuff for vinegar and oil salad dressing,then finished up the blend with the rest of the ingredients,, and It worked really well

Bud

What are you reading, because it sounds like the kind of thing I've been looking for.

Cheers,

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Along these lines - I am trying to make a MC recipe that calls for liquid lecithin - I have powdered lecithin - should I just dissolve in water (and in what ratios) or something else or go out and try to find liquid lecithin?

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after reading up on improving the emulsification capability of lechithin I recently tried putting it into heated oil at140Ffor 5 minutes ,then using a stick blender to break it up,and cool, before I added the rest of the stuff for vinegar and oil salad dressing,then finished up the blend with the rest of the ingredients,, and It worked really well

Bud

What are you reading, because it sounds like the kind of thing I've been looking for.

Cheers,

Dont have the websites, enter on google search"lechithin+improving emulsification", and you will get a bunch of stuff...The key thing being heat,and putting the granules in the hot oil,not other things...ie, water, etc...temps vary all over the place butI used oneof the lower temps.. good reading,,

Bud

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I've purchased lecithin granules about 4 times, stored them in a 'cool, dry place' and 3 out of 4 times they've gone off before I've had a chance to use them (less than two months). The one time where they were still viable, I was able to use them once, but once the air hit them, a few days later they were toast. When I tried pre-powdering granules, the time frame shrunk even more dramatically.

Lecithin, imo, isn't viable for the home chef. It's practically impossible to find a store with fast enough turnover to insure a fresh product, and even if you did luck upon a good source, you'd have to have a recipe to use the whole bottle at once (or use a small amount and lose a good chunk of cash on the rest).

Cteavin, spoiled lecithin is gummy and very hard to dissolve. Are your granules at all gummy? If they are, toss them.

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You hit the nail on the head: gummy. That means they're off, eh. Well, that explains a lot.

Since it's derived from soy beans is it possible to make at home? Soy beans are all around. Or, are there good alternative sources?

Cheers,

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