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FoodMuse

Tod Mun Goong (Thai shrimp cakes)

5 posts in this topic

I'm thinking of making these today or tomorrow. Looks simple. Puree raw shrimp to a paste and add in seasonings like fish sauce, chili and onion then shallow fry. I'm seeing lots of recipes around the web.

Have you made this before? or had it at a restaurant?

Thanks!

Grace


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

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I have -- many times. I think that the key is refraining from too much binder in the meat, if any at all, which can produce shrimp hockey pucks. IIRC, the best ones I've made used a couple of fat sea scallops to that end.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Thanks Chris!

Bahh! Just opened the package and Fresh Direct screwed up my order. They sent me salmon instead of shrimp, but what the heck I'll make it anyway.

As a binder I think I'll just use an egg yolk.

Other ingredients:

  • cilantro
  • Fish Sauce
  • sugar
  • green curry paste
  • minced serrano
  • vidalia onion
  • maybe ginger, I'm on the fence about that one.


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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Be light handed when making them. If not, you will again get hockey pucks.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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It was fantastic!!!!! I worked off of maybe 4 recipes I found on Thai websites and came up with the following. I think the Panko coating really elevated the dish. Very crunchy outside with soft salmon and crunchy cilantro stems and vidalia onion. I'm definitely making this for the next party I have and making them appetizer size.

I tossed 1lb of salmon in the blender along with:

  • 2 Tbsp Fish sauce
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp Sugar
  • lots of ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 - 2 Tbsp Green Thai curry paste

Chopped it to a puree, then realized I had to fish the skins out. :hmmm: What's lovely is the skin stayed in whole pieces and the meat had been removed. Kind of amazing.

I added the fish mixture to a bowl and folded in:

  • a good handful of cilantro, with stems because we like them
  • about 1/4 cup of minced vidalia onion

I chilled it for an hour and dredged 1/4-1/2 inch patties in Panko crumbs.

Shallow fried in shallow peanut oil for no more than 3 minutes per side.

We had it with my roast asparagus wrapped in bacon, pea puree, homemade mango ketchup, yogurt and Matouk's hotsauce. Epic.

I can't wait to make it with shrimp.


Edited by FoodMuse (log)

Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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