Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

AnneN

"Escoffier – Le Guide Culinaire": New Edition

Recommended Posts

I just received the latest edition of Le Guide Culinaire. The forewords by Heston Blumenthal and Dr. Timothy Ryan explain the relevancy of Escoffier on modern cooking. Do you think it is relevant? Do you use this cookbook?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see it as relevant in a historic sense, and think every serious foodie should have it just for fun. That being said, I haven't made a single thing from that book, but it's not alone in that regard...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an older edition, and I do use it -especially for brainstorming menu ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For most home cooks. No way.

For Chefs or culinary students, well sure. It's great for inspiration, see what the classic garnishes were. There are a lot of great sauces. There are no real recipes, so for a chef that is a plus. If you do competition cooking (ACF) It's good to go back to the source, especially if you are using classical terms in your menu.

Escoffier's Ma Cusine is very under rated and has more what you would think of as traditional recipes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's interesting to cook from the classic sources and to get an idea of what those sauces should really taste like, no short cuts, and a lot of twentieth-century foods make sense when you are aware of their earlier context.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a side note, as this book is over 100 years old, it's out of copyright and the whole thing can be downloade or viewed in electronic form here...

http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924000610117

My order for MC was delayed, and so I d-loaded the above as something to occupy me while waiting. It is a remarkable compilation, and I felt it was worthwhile reading through those methods that he regarded as fundamental to all the recipes. There are quite a number of things I have marked as something to try when I get the time. I was also interested how there is a specific name for every slight variation of a basic recipe. I wonder if that has something to do with every region having its own signature interpretation on a dish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bumpbumpbump

Has anyone actually cooked from Escoffier before (any edition) in a serious way? I'm not concerned about the lack of detail in his recipes--I figure if you already have the basic skills to some degree and something to help find out about the stuff you don't already know (Google, Larousse, etc) you'll be fine--but any tips? Recipes you'd suggest? I was aiming to make a menu of Escoffier dishes that was pretty much by-the-book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want an Escoffier book to cook out of, I would recommend getting Ma Cuisine. It has more detailed recipes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought the book in december 2011, and although I have never really exactly reproduced one of the recipes, it is the best source of inspiration I could imagine. The book (which is a LOT thinner than the Silver Spoon) contains over 5000 "recipes", and gives a lot of variations on "classic" dishes. If you are considering buying it, keep in mind it is published as a reference work, not an actual practical-everyday-cookery book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm an 'Escoffier' lover. Got the books. I cook 'SV' and make AE sauces to the letter....no short cuts/substitutions. Quite a combination.

I found this treasure at a garage sale a couple of years ago. I've made every stock and sauce in this book and about half the dishes. The taste of an authentic Escoffier sauce is sublime, especially with 'SV' meats and veg's.

100_4700.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the 2009 Flammarion repro of the 1921 classic. (Or should that be 'classique'?)

When you want to know what Tony Bourdain has left out, this is the book you want. Anthony's 'Les Halles' is also a classic, yes, but with shortcuts. Stocks and demi, particularly.

If you want to do a Sous Vide riff; as we all do; Le Guide is the Source (Holy Grail).

(Print this in big letters and press - stick to your kitchen wall!)

Me, I found the english translation of Ma Cuisine to be too different to the French original to trust. Ja, I read French good. And I do NOT like editors telling me stuff tha author didnae put in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got my first copy in 1973 I was still at secondary school my Gran bought it for me unfortunately it was in French a language a 13 year old boy in Scotland wasn't fluent in, I purchased an English copy a year later and still have and read it to this day it was described to me as the "Culinary Bible" can't say I disagree too much( apart from a dislike for the word bible and it's connotations).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a cook book called "2000 Favourite French Recipes By Auguste Escoffier. It says it was first published as Ma Cuisine in 1965 by Hamlin.

My edition published by Treasure Press in 1991. (ISBN 1 85051 694 4) It purports to be the only book he wrote for the home cook.

I have no idea of the authenticity, but its a wonderful cook book. All the classic recipes, but sized ans rewritten for the 'home ' cook.

Any help with the origins of this book would be greatly appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also tend to use some kind of Escoffier preparation almost every day. Alongside of my regular cooking textbooks, The Escoffier Cookbook was a mandatory at my culinary school. I even use it at home, which leads me to marvel at what an impressive and time-tested tome this is!

I don't know if there's any truth to it, but I've heard that his many names for dishes, no matter how small the variation of recipe was based not on regional differences and titles, but rather from a need to name more dishes than any other chef in the world. Good old fashioned egotism, basically...

As a side note, as this book is over 100 years old, it's out of copyright and the whole thing can be downloade or viewed in electronic form here...

http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924000610117


My order for MC was delayed, and so I d-loaded the above as something to occupy me while waiting. It is a remarkable compilation, and I felt it was worthwhile reading through those methods that he regarded as fundamental to all the recipes. There are quite a number of things I have marked as something to try when I get the time. I was also interested how there is a specific name for every slight variation of a basic recipe. I wonder if that has something to do with every region having its own signature interpretation on a dish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Cookwhoplaysdrums
      Can anyone suggest me some good books related to Gastronomy, food history, culture, recipes based on different cultures. 
      Also recommend the best food magazine subscriptions. 
    • By artiesel
      THE BOOKS ARE SOLD
       
       
      I have Volumes 1 ,2 and 4 of Jean-Pierre Wybauw's Great Chocolate books are for sale.
       
      The books are in great shape!  There is some tape on the corner of the front of volume 1 that I used to keep it together after a drop.  Volume 1 is also autographed by the author (See pics below).
       
      I'm asking $150 for the lot OBO.
       
      Let me know if interested or if you have questions
       
       
       



    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
    • By Mullinix18
      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
    • By Mullinix18
      I have seen referenced in several places on the internet, including Wikipedia, a stat about escoffier recommending 40 minutes for scrambled eggs in a Bain Marie. I cant find where this number is from. On Wikipedia it refers to the book I currently own, the "Escoffier le guide culinaire" with forward by Heston Blumenthal by h. L. Cracknell...specificly page 157 for the 40 minute cooking time of scrambled eggs but it's not in my book on that page! Even tho there is the recipe for scrambled eggs on that page... I've seen the 1903 first edition online.. And it's not in there either.... Where is this number from?? Id like to know in case there is some even more complete book or something out there that I'm missing. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×