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Kerry Beal

Report: eG Chocolate and Confectionery Conference 2011

76 posts in this topic

Wow! What an experience, brought me back to my time at the CIA. Kerry deserves a tremendous amount of praise for organizing an absolutely wonderful conference. Being a new member and having a total of 2 posts I came to the conference to learn and it was more than I could have hoped for. It was a privilege meeting all of you and thank you for the wealth of information you shared with me. I must have asked Chocolot a thousand questions from tempering, packaging to running a successful business, there was not a questions she didn’t patiently answer. The caramel demo Bob gave me was nothing short of perfect, I can’t wait to give it another try. Conversations with Chris and his wife ranged from living in Sooner Country to the aerodynamics of a Formula One car. Chris, when your wife gets tenure just keep telling yourself it was all about the chocolates.

Instead of sifting through my 100+ pics I have been busy contacting a granite supplier, a steel fabricator for confectionary frames and Lotte Andersson from Callebaut for a supplier in NYC. I came to the conference with only a Little Dipper and left with a long list of equipment I need. Thanks again to all of you!

Kerry asked that I post some pictures of the Chef Rubber kit that was given to us so here they are.

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Derrick basically said that nut fat and animal fat set at 17 degrees so you need to table your ganache down lower than if you were just using chocolate. He said if you are not using nut fat(he used pistachios) or animal fat(he used butter) then you do not need to table the ganache.

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Here are a few more pics. I haven't figured out how to post them in the proper order but you all should be able to figure them out.

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Edited by Gene (log)

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Just recalled the request for the tart recipe from Diana -

Pastry -

90 grams butter/lard 45 grams each

1 tablespoon oil

3 tablespoons water

⅛ teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon sugar (less)

150 grams flour

1. Put fats, water, salt and sugar into oven at 410º F for 15 minutes until bubbly and browning. Stir in flour - watch will splatter.

2. one batch makes enough for two trays of the little tartlets - so about 24 tarts

3. 375 for about 15 minutes.

Caramelized Red Onions

Caramelize about 3 thinly sliced red onions with olive oil, butter and a bit of honey. Drizzle with balsamic, salt and pepper to taste.

Royale

1 cup cream

2 eggs

1 tsp salt

Assembly-

To prebaked tart shell - add some of the onions, top with some danish bleu cheese or stilton (the moldy kind), pour over some custard royale. Bake at about 350 until cheese is melted and custard has set. Top with a bit more of the onions.

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Kerry, thank you for the recipe. Those tarts were delicious.

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Thank you for the recipe, Kerry! A while ago I saw a similar one, with leeks and goat cheese, but I loved the blue in yours. I've never made pastry using the technique you've described, but now I have a good reason to try it!

Thanks,

Diana

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Thank you for the recipe, Kerry! A while ago I saw a similar one, with leeks and goat cheese, but I loved the blue in yours. I've never made pastry using the technique you've described, but now I have a good reason to try it!

Thanks,

Diana

The recipe for the pastry is from David Lebovitz's site - here.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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Although I was not in attendence, a doff of the old skimmer here to Kerry for organizing this event for all who did and to all for sharing it here with us.

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Kerry, what size are the tart pans? Are they the mini, about 1" ones?

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Kerry, what size are the tart pans? Are they the mini, about 1" ones?

Yup - those are the ones.

Which reminds me - I'm going to start a thread on tart tampers - I'm not totally satisfied with mine - and need some opinions on them.

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Thank you, Kerry.

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At the conference, Kerry brought her pottery atomizer and brought extras for us to buy. I got it home and came up with a way to use my air brush to push the air. The first photo is a picture of my air brush--I use a Harbor Freight quick change and the atomizer. I removed the screw on cap and put the end in the atomizer. Short burst of air and this is what I got.

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splatter.jpg

Finished chocolates

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Kerry is amazing to come up with all these ideas!! A huge thank you again for all your efforts on our behalf.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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After reading through this report, I'm really bummed that I wasn't able to attend. Thanks to RobertM and Chris Hennes for posting their videos. I picked up so many tips in just those 12 minutes alone.

I do have a few questions regarding tabling of ganache. At what point do you begin the tabling process? As soon as the emulsion is formed? Or do you first let it cool below the point where agitation would cause it to separate? I have Greweling's book and the only discussion of tabling ganache is in the piped ganache technique. There he states that after the ganache has cooled to 72F, it needs very little agitation. I would think that what Derrick demonstrated is more than a "little agitation". And I'm curious to know how Derrick used that ganache after he tabled it. Spread into a frame then cut? Piped into molds?

Tabeling a ganache does not effect the texture/grain of the finished product, it has to do with how the fats crystalize, and specifically the cocoa butter which "traps" the flavors within the ganache. This allows greater flavor "explosion" in the mouth.

I'm a bit confused with this because in Greweling's book, he states that tabling ganache causes it to set with a shorter and firmer texture. Also that an over agitated ganache will not have the smooth, creamy texture that is desired. Does Derrick's book, or any other book, have more detailed information on this technique than Greweling's?

Thanks for any insights you're willing to share.

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After reading through this report, I'm really bummed that I wasn't able to attend. Thanks to RobertM and Chris Hennes for posting their videos. I picked up so many tips in just those 12 minutes alone.

I do have a few questions regarding tabling of ganache. At what point do you begin the tabling process? As soon as the emulsion is formed? Or do you first let it cool below the point where agitation would cause it to separate? I have Greweling's book and the only discussion of tabling ganache is in the piped ganache technique. There he states that after the ganache has cooled to 72F, it needs very little agitation. I would think that what Derrick demonstrated is more than a "little agitation". And I'm curious to know how Derrick used that ganache after he tabled it. Spread into a frame then cut? Piped into molds?

Tabeling a ganache does not effect the texture/grain of the finished product, it has to do with how the fats crystalize, and specifically the cocoa butter which "traps" the flavors within the ganache. This allows greater flavor "explosion" in the mouth.

I'm a bit confused with this because in Greweling's book, he states that tabling ganache causes it to set with a shorter and firmer texture. Also that an over agitated ganache will not have the smooth, creamy texture that is desired. Does Derrick's book, or any other book, have more detailed information on this technique than Greweling's?

Thanks for any insights you're willing to share.

No information in his book (none of the ganaches are tabled in it) and no mention in the recipe that he tabled.

Someone who was there when he made this ganache will have to comment.

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At the conference, Kerry brought her pottery atomizer and brought extras for us to buy. I got it home and came up with a way to use my air brush to push the air. The first photo is a picture of my air brush--I use a Harbor Freight quick change and the atomizer. I removed the screw on cap and put the end in the atomizer. Short burst of air and this is what I got.

photo.jpg

splatter.jpg

Finished chocolates

photo1.jpg

Kerry is amazing to come up with all these ideas!! A huge thank you again for all your efforts on our behalf.

So we attacked the box of chocolates that Chocolat brought for me the other night! First they are a total feast for the eyes - and everyone we tasted was excellent. Textures are fabulous, flavours wonderful! I'm so lucky to have a box - nah,nah!

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Photos from our day at Tomric:

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Photos from Derrick's demo:

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Miscellaneous conference photos:

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Saturday's dinner!

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Kerry, I just remember the bonito flake caramels that were mentioned at the conference... have you posted the recipe somewhere here on eG? If not, could you? :biggrin:


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Kerry, I just remember the bonito flake caramels that were mentioned at the conference... have you posted the recipe somewhere here on eG? If not, could you? :biggrin:

Bonito Passion Fruit Centers

25 grams sugar

135 grams white chocolate

2 grams bonito

60 grams cream

65 grams passion fruit puree

10 grams glucose

25 grams butter

Caramelize sugar, deglaze with cream and passion fruit steeped with bonito strained out. Pour over chopped chocolate, mix with immersion blender, add butter.

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Question for whoever -- Matt? made the ginger PDF. Was the Amoretti ginger brown or clear?


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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