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Looking for a "crispy" citrus glaze


Josho
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I'm making a couple of poundcakes, and I'd love to make a lemon or orange glaze for them. I've had a few cakes where the citrus glaze was actually crispy -- almost like a very thin sugar shell, but in shards.

Will any supersaturated glaze do this, or is there a technique to it? Usually, mine only seem to crystallize very slightly (if at all). I imagine humidity has a lot to do with it. But I'd like to guarantee myself a crispy glaze.

Any help at all would be greatly appreciated.

Josh

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Josh - I'm not sure if it'll get you as "crispy" as you want but I do something similar for a lemon teacake I do. When the cake is 80-90% baked, I quickly remove it from the oven and brush it with a lemon flavoured sugar syrup. I then return to the oven and let the cake finish baking. During that baking time, the syrup dries out and provides a crispy exterior.

Edited to add: I tend to use quite a lot of lemon syrup so that (1) the crispy shell is noticeable and (2) the syrup also flavours the inside of the cake

Edited by gap (log)
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I'm making a lemon pound cake for a coffee shop that is based on my chef's aunt's recipe. Once the cakes come out of the oven and are still hot, I poke holes all over the cake. Then I brush it with a mixture of sugar and lemon juice. The mix is juice with lots of sugar so it's not dissolved and kind of slushy. After the cakes cool, they have a crust on them. I sometimes try to do a couple of coats, but as long as the mixture is not dissolved like a syrup, the crusty-ness forms. Gives it a nice crunch.

Edited by RWood (log)
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I would imagine you could cook a sugar syrup to a higher temp, so it was more like candy and then drizzle it over, that should make it good and crispy! Almost like the shell on a candy apple...

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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  • 2 weeks later...

I also bake lemon loaf regularly for a coffee house. After it's cooled for 10 minutes I remove it from the pan and thoroughly soak it using 220 grams fresh squeezed lemon juice to 440 grams white sugar. That's enough for two 16" loaves. It takes a few minutes to soak all of it in so be patient. To have the crisp finish I find you have to eat it fresh. Once it's cut and wrapped the crisp lemon coating softens very quickly.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Canadian,

You're absolutely right -- the crust does NOT survive wrapping or standing much at all.

The next batch I make, I'll try your formula on one cake. On the other, I'm going to try a different approach -- a moist sugar/lemon topping that goes on just before baking. Perhaps if I can achieve some caramelizing of the crust, I can end up with something a little more long-lasting. But I doubt it. :-)

Josh

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