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Dessert sauce incorporating sriracha hot sauce


Zeemanb
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I'm planning a bbq in a couple of weeks where I'll be serving homemade Vietnamese coffee ice cream along with some sort of ginger cookies. I'm trying to think of a tasty and unique way to incorporate Sriracha in maybe a caramel sauce, or a candied nut...something of that nature that can go over the ice cream.

Any ideas or experience with this?

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

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My eG Food Blog- 2011

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While I like the confluence of savory & sweet, I can't think that sriracha's garlic would play very well in a dessert. Use a straight chili sauce, not a chili garlic sauce, or dried chili peppers to add heat. A heat-spiked chocolate sauce is nice...but I'd add the heat to the ginger cookies. A black-pepper ginger cookie; mmm. How about ice cream sandwiches since it's a BBQ?

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Ice cream saannddwiicheesssss, now THERE'S the beginning of a great idea. Can make them ahead, keep some frozen for late arrivals/multiple late night snacks for myself. Thanks for the new train of thought! Black pepper would provide a not-so-obvious element of heat on the back end.

You're right about the garlic component there.....that's a toughie. We've been wanting to roast some chickpeas as a snackfood after seeing a recipe somewhere, and that would be more of an appropriate Rooster application.

I'll keep thinking....saw a recipe for candied bacon w/sriracha that had promise and may top some cornbread prior to baking.

The desserty saucey idea was more about having guests go "Well I'll be darned! Sriracha!", but deliciousness takes precedence over being impressive or quirky.

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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I would definately add some finely chopped candied ginger to whatever recipe you are using for the cookie. Leeuwen's truck does it that way, and wowsa, the extra heat and chewy bits really do it. I have nevr tasred a ginger cookie as good as theirs.

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Sambal Oelek has a very similar chili-heat profile to Sriracha, but without garlic, additional spices or sugar.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Thanks again! After a brief huddle we decided we’re definitely going the ice cream sandwich route... my wife found a good recipe for ginger cookies that incorporates black pepper, cardamom and fresh/powdered/candied ginger...that’s a lot of ginger, so practice batches will be made and eaten first. Homemade Vietnamese coffee ice cream will round out the sandwich.

Bacon-topped cast iron cornbread with maple pecan butter will also be making an appearance……

Oh, and sriracha deviled eggs. Once I had it on the brain I had to think of SOME application.

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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