Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Growing Mexican Ingredients in Zone 5a


Recommended Posts

Am about to put in an Mexican ingredient order for seeds with Richter's, an excellent herb and vegetable greenhouse located in Ontario. Ed is going to rototill a patch of the old gourd patch for me and Ms Black Thumb will see what she can get.

My order: Epazote, Anaheim, Poblano, De Arbol, Pasilla, Serrano, and Tomatillo. Have I forgotten anything?

(If I can make it there, I'll buy plug paks for the Tomatillo, the only plugs offered of the above list.)

They have no beans which are meant to be cooked from dry, only wax beans and such. Can you get beans across the Canadian border with no problems? Can I plant pinto beans which I can buy at the bulk food store? I seem to recall doing just that a couple of decades ago.

Thanks.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My order: Epazote, Anaheim, Poblano, De Arbol, Pasilla, Serrano, and Tomatillo. Have I forgotten anything?

(If I can make it there, I'll buy plug paks for the Tomatillo, the only plugs offered of the above list.)

Thanks.

Good luck on your project. I suspect you'll have better luck than you think.

Just an FYI, pasilla is a dried chile, fresh they are called chilaca and are pretty easy to grow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd suggest you grow the herbs (cilantro and epazote) in pots that you can bring in when the weather turns cold.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cilantro. Should be slow to bolt up there. Mexican oregano maybe?

The Mexican oregano is a good idea.

Mediterranean oregano, Mexican oregano, and marjoram

Too bad you can't order from Rancho Gordo up there. He's got a Mexican oregano that's the best I've ever tasted:

Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio

That stuff is fantastic.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cilantro. Should be slow to bolt up there. Mexican oregano maybe?

The Mexican oregano is a good idea.

Mediterranean oregano, Mexican oregano, and marjoram

Too bad you can't order from Rancho Gordo up there. He's got a Mexican oregano that's the best I've ever tasted:

Rancho Gordo Oregano Indio

That stuff is fantastic.

Got it. The Mexican oregano. Had forgotten all about it. Thanks.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chile Peppers: Hot Tips and Tasty Picks for Gardeners and Gourmets (Brooklyn Botanic Garden Handbooks)ed. Beth Hanson. Not listed on Amazon.

Does anyone know it? Should I buy it? Richter's carries it.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As long as you're going for it, try huazontle too. It's one of those things I never see in stores here but tend to eat a lot of in Mexico. And papaloquelite, if you want to make a proper cemita sandwich.

Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

Twitter @RanchoGordo

"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am in zone 5b/6a (warmer than you), and it is way too late in the year for growing chiles or tomatillos from seeds here--you should have started them indoors 6 weeks ago. Chiles especially take a long time to mature--I don't think you have a chance with seeds this year. If you have already ordered them, no worries--they will be good next year. But for this year, buy some plants.

I have never grown epazote, but cilantro is a snap, comes up and matures quickly. Plant some every couple of weeks til the end of summer to keep a fresh supply.

You can indeed buy a bag of dried beans and plant them. If they are from a a place with good turnover, they will be fresh and will grow just fine.

I am a Master Gardener--sometimes I know what I am talking about. :rolleyes:

sparrowgrass
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had trouble growing cilantro in SW Ontario. It never took off. Its so cheap at Food Basic I never bothered again. I only have a balcony now( vs. a yard when I was in Ontario) and I wouldnt bother wasting a precious space now with Cilantro. Especially when I can get it for 25 cents a bunch at the Mexican markets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As long as you're going for it, try huazontle too. It's one of those things I never see in stores here but tend to eat a lot of in Mexico. And papaloquelite, if you want to make a proper cemita sandwich.

Had to Google three words that time. Needless to say, Richter's doesn't carry the two herbs. We have a very, very small Mexican/Hispanic/Latino population in Canada and thus it's hard to get most things.

And furthermore, I have just been informed that I am too late to grow a number of things unless I buy them in plant form. Richter's does carry Mexican oregano and Tomatillos in plant form, but all the rest is seeds.

As Sparrowgrass would know, we can't put anything in the ground here until June 1st. Oh well, next year....

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Darienne

In the past, I have purchased my pepper plants at Richters, Humber Nurseries and a small place called Giardinos. Giardinos was near Richters, and carried a very large variety of heirloom tomatoes, peppers and other vegetables. Unfortunately, they will not be selling plants this year, so they are out.

Humber Nurseries will probably be my go-to this year. Their varieties of peppers seems to vary from year-to-year, but I have purchased jalapeno, serrano, tomatillo, cayenne, and poblano plants (as well as some ornamentals) in the past. N.B. - in 2009 they did not have poblanos, which sent me to Richters and then we stumbled on Giardinos. I didn't even bother looking at Humber in 2010, but will end up turning to them again this year. I'll hopefully be up before the weekend and will report back with what I find, if it interests you.

Hope this helps,

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Darienne

In the past, I have purchased my pepper plants at Richters, Humber Nurseries and a small place called Giardinos. Giardinos was near Richters, and carried a very large variety of heirloom tomatoes, peppers and other vegetables. Unfortunately, they will not be selling plants this year, so they are out.

Humber Nurseries will probably be my go-to this year. Their varieties of peppers seems to vary from year-to-year, but I have purchased jalapeno, serrano, tomatillo, cayenne, and poblano plants (as well as some ornamentals) in the past. N.B. - in 2009 they did not have poblanos, which sent me to Richters and then we stumbled on Giardinos. I didn't even bother looking at Humber in 2010, but will end up turning to them again this year. I'll hopefully be up before the weekend and will report back with what I find, if it interests you.

Hope this helps,

Brian

It does and where is Humbers? I can google it and hope it's not too near Toronto or west of.

ps. I cannot believe the heck I just went through to finally find out that Humbers is in Brampton. No way.

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess it depends on your definition of Toronto.

It's in the north-west corner of the 'GTA' (Greater Toronto Area for those not familiar).

Humber Nurseries Ltd.

8386 Hwy. 50,

Brampton, Ontario

L6T 0A5

Not sure about posting links here, so Google 'Humber Nurseries' and you should be good.

If you're not averse to using the 407 (toll highway, again, for those not familiar), it would be about 2 hours from Peterborough, so long as you avoid peak times.

I'll try and get there before the weekend and report back.

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know anything about Toronto, but some of our big nurseries and garden stores carry an amazing variety of plants--even a big Wal-Mart or Lowes might have at least some of the plants you are looking for. I am thinking Anaheims, serrano and tomatillos, in particular would be easy to find here, anyway. Sometimes health/natural food stores carry some plants in the spring, too.

I am worried about this problem--when someone gets the gardening bug, I hate to see it thwarted!!

sparrowgrass
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had trouble growing cilantro in SW Ontario. It never took off. Its so cheap at Food Basic I never bothered again. I only have a balcony now( vs. a yard when I was in Ontario) and I wouldnt bother wasting a precious space now with Cilantro. Especially when I can get it for 25 cents a bunch at the Mexican markets.

We lived in Panama for a number of years, and cilantro grew wild everywhere, most certainly including our yard. I figured I'd have no trouble growing it in Central Texas and I planted some when we lived in Austin.

But Central Texas in the summer is much hotter than it ever gets in Panama, so none of my cilantro made it through. It all burned up in the heat. I gave up on growing it after that first year. For one thing, it's so easy to find. Obviously, Texas has a huge Mexican influence so our mainstream grocers carry it, but it's also very popular in several Asian cuisines. If you can't find it in Mexican markets up there, you might give Asian markets a try.

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know anything about Toronto, but some of our big nurseries and garden stores carry an amazing variety of plants--even a big Wal-Mart or Lowes might have at least some of the plants you are looking for. I am thinking Anaheims, serrano and tomatillos, in particular would be easy to find here, anyway. Sometimes health/natural food stores carry some plants in the spring, too.

I am worried about this problem--when someone gets the gardening bug, I hate to see it thwarted!!

Thanks for the encouragement, but we don't have Lowes...yet...and only a very few nurseries...like Richters...would even carry these kinds of plants. We simply don't have a very big Latin population in these h'ar parts.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had trouble growing cilantro in SW Ontario. It never took off. Its so cheap at Food Basic I never bothered again. I only have a balcony now( vs. a yard when I was in Ontario) and I wouldnt bother wasting a precious space now with Cilantro. Especially when I can get it for 25 cents a bunch at the Mexican markets.

We lived in Panama for a number of years, and cilantro grew wild everywhere, most certainly including our yard. I figured I'd have no trouble growing it in Central Texas and I planted some when we lived in Austin.

But Central Texas in the summer is much hotter than it ever gets in Panama, so none of my cilantro made it through. It all burned up in the heat. I gave up on growing it after that first year. For one thing, it's so easy to find. Obviously, Texas has a huge Mexican influence so our mainstream grocers carry it, but it's also very popular in several Asian cuisines. If you can't find it in Mexican markets up there, you might give Asian markets a try.

So Ed tried two grocery chains this morning and neither had cilantro. :sad:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry if you already knew that, but I'm really surprised that you aren't able to find it. I would generally expect it to be in most grocery stores, even in the smaller towns. I shop fairly regularly in two grocery stores in Orillia, Ontario (not suggesting you go to Orillia to get cilantro, it's just fairly small, population about 30,000), and I can't remember any occasion they didn't have it.

Hope that helps,

Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cilantro is often called Coriander in these parts...

Yes, and I've also seen it called Chinese parsley.

In addition to cilantro, you can also often find a nice selection of chile peppers at those Asian markets. Darienne, do you have Asian markets where you live? Have you tried that?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Mexican garden seems to have shrunk now to the plants which I can purchase at Richter's in a couple of weeks: tomatillos and Mexican oregano.

No nursery in this area carries any Mexican chile peppers except for Jalapenos which you can buy any time of the year in any grocery store. If it can be worked in, we'll go to the Humber nursery in Brampton.

Thanks for all the help.

oh...if Epazote is an herb, could I not grow it indoors anyway???

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found one source that said you could bring a plant in for the winter. Sounds like it is a big plant--2-4 feet tall. You could probably cut it back before you bring it in to force some new growth. Seems like it also grows wild everywhere, but it does not look familiar to me. And if you start it in your garden, it reseeds itself.

sparrowgrass
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By cyalexa
      Salsa Para Enchiladas  
      3 ancho chiles
      2 New Mexico chiles
      2 chipotle chiles
      1 clove garlic, sliced
      2 TB flour
      2 TB vegetable oil
      1 tsp vinegar
      ¾ tsp salt
      ¼ tsp dried oregano
      2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid
      Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
    • By gulfporter
      Grilled fish recipe from Mexico. 
       
      Pescado Zarendeado
       
      4 large dried ancho chiles 2 dried chiles de arból (omit if you prefer a milder sauce) ½ small onion, chopped 8 ounces canned tomato sauce 4 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced 3 tablespoons Ponzu sauce (or substitute ½ soy sauce, ½ lime juice) 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup mayonnaise 2 kilos Pargo blanco or red snapper (huachinango) one 2-kilo fish or two 1-kilo fish. Butterflied from the belly out.  Remove and discard the stems and seeds from chiles. Place the chiles in a bowl and cover completely with boiling water and then soak for 40 minutes.
      Remove the chiles and place in a food processor with ½ cup of the soaking liquid, the onion, tomato sauce, garlic, Ponzu, Worcestershire and the salt. Process until very smooth. Sieve the mixture into a bowl, then add the mayonnaise and blend.
      Set aside 2/3 cup of the blended sauce to serve with the cooked fish. The rest will be used to prepare the fish for the grill.
      Slather the flesh-side of the fish with the sauce and then place, skin-side down on a hot charcoal or gas grill. Cooking time will vary depending on the size of the fish. (About 15 minutes for a one-kilo snapper on my gas grill at medium-high, lid closed).
      Place cooked fish on a large platter; use a spoon to remove the flesh.
      Serve with fresh tortillas and pickled onions. Pass the reserved sauce.
      Pickled Red Onions
      Thinly slice a medium red onion into a glass bowl, toss with the juice of a large lime, one or two finely minced serrano chiles and ¼ teaspoon salt. Best if marinated overnight in the fridge.
    • By Kasia
      My quesadilla
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a dish which meets holiday requirements. It is easy, and it doesn't need sophisticated ingredients or an oven. A frying pan is enough. Quesadilla, the dish in question, is a tortilla with melted cheese. The rest of the ingredients you choose at your discretion. Red beans, pepper, chorizo or fried meat all work brilliantly. I added fried pieces of turkey leg. Thanks to this, my dish could be a holiday dinner.

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      4 tortillas
      300g of turkey leg
      half a chili pepper
      half an onion
      1 clove of garlic
      2 tablespoons of oil
      200g of tinned sweetcorn
      200g of tinned red beans
      fresh pepper
      200g of mozzarella cheese
      salt and pepper

      Cube the meat. Fry the diced onion, garlic and chili pepper in oil. Add the spiced-up-with-salt-and-pepper meat and fry on a low heat until the meat is soft. Cube the pepper. Drain the sweetcorn and red beans and slice the mozzarella cheese. Put the tortilla into a dry, heated pan. Arrange the meat, sweetcorn and red beans on it. Cover with the slices of the mozzarella cheese and the second tortilla. Fry on a low heat for a while. Turn it and fry a bit more until the cheese has melted. Put it on a plate and cut it into triangles.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       
       

    • By Pierogi
      Mexican Rice
      Serves 4 as Side.

      1 T olive oil
      1 small onion, finely chopped
      2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
      1-1/2 c long-grain rice
      3 c low-salt chicken broth or stock
      2 med-size tomatoes (about 12 oz total), chopped
      1 can (4&1/2 oz) chopped green chilies
      1 tsp chili powder
      1/2 tsp salt
      1/4 tsp pepper
      1/2 c fresh chopped cilantro
      1/2 c pimento-stuffed green olives, sliced

      Heat oil in 4-quart saucepan over med-high heat until hot. (Make sure you use a large enough pot, I tried to make it fit into a 3&1/2 quart pot and it was very tight). Add onion & garlic, cook until soft. Add rice, and stir well, cook, stirring occasionally, until rice toasts a bit and turns golden, about 3-5 minutes. Add broth, tomatoes, chiles, chili powder, and S&P. Cover, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered, until rice is done, about 25 min. You may have some liquid still left.
      Turn off heat and stir in cilantro and olives, Cover and let stand for 10 minutes.
      Keywords: Side, Rice, Mexican, Easy
      ( RG2089 )
    • By chardgirl
      Greens Tacos
      I like to make these for breakfast or lunch: I try to eat dark leafy greens most days one way or another.

      3/4 lb greens, cleaned well and sliced into approximate 1 inch pieces (today I used arugula and radish greens, leaving the radish ‘roots' in the fridge to be munched on later. the greens are good to eat, but
      2 tsp cooking oil
      2 stalks green garlic, cleaned as a leek and chopped, or another allium family, whatever you have on hand (onion, green onion, garlic, leek.....)

      Pinch red pepper flakes or cayenne
      2 T cream cheese
      4 small corn tortillas or 2-3 larger flour ones

      Heat the oil and add the garlic, having the greens ready to go, and cook garlic for about 30 seconds. Then add greens and cook until bright green and wilted, add red pepper (and salt and black pepper if you like). Take off heat and stir in cream cheese. Heat tortillas, divide filling among them. Eat and enjoy.
      Keywords: Vegetables, Easy, Vegetarian
      ( RG1521 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...